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Juvenile Delinquency

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NEWS
November 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Growing up in a single-parent or broken home is not likely to lead to juvenile delinquency, a study by a University of Cincinnati criminal justice professor shows. Patricia Van Voorhis says she found that poor quality home life is what leads to delinquent behavior, regardless of whether the family is intact. She found that physical abuse, conflict, lack of affection, minimal supervision and little enjoyment in the home lead to delinquency.
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OPINION
March 3, 2007
ANYONE STRUGGLING to understand the challenges and failures of Los Angeles in 2007 need look no further than the Tale of the Santee Tagger. It goes something like this: Students are harassed as they walk the two blocks from a bus stop to the Santee Education Complex. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa responds by putting a new stop closer to the school, then stages a media event to tout the accomplishment.
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NEWS
January 27, 1996
Solomon Kobrin, 85, an educator who was a pioneer in combating juvenile delinquency. The Chicago native attended the universities of Wisconsin and Chicago and earned his doctorate at USC, where he taught until his retirement in 1975. He was a past president of the Illinois Academy of Criminology and the Assn. for Criminal Justice Research, and had been a consultant to the President's Committee on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, and to the U.S.
WORLD
June 24, 2005 | Amberin Zaman, Special to The Times
Deniz was 10 when he committed his first crime. "I stole a few candy bars. It was pretty easy," recalled the gaunt teenager, his speech slurred by chronic drug abuse. "Now I do cellphones." Deniz, who just turned 17, is part of a swelling band of juvenile criminals roaming the streets of this predominantly Kurdish city of 1.5 million people in Turkey's impoverished southeast. Delinquents are blamed for a skyrocketing number of pedestrian muggings, car thefts and home robberies.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They knocked the drunk down and beat in his face with paving stones, kicking him and punching him with all the viciousness coiled in their wiry boys' bodies, until his rattling grunts stopped. They watched him die. Then the three Yakovlev brothers, all younger than 15 at the time, cleaned out his pockets--although they did not kill him to rob him, said the youngest.
NEWS
September 24, 1985
A 14-year-old boy in Beloit, Wis., went on trial on juvenile delinquency charges in the July 26 slaying of a 9-year-old who refused to share his bicycle, and jurors were asked whether they doubted that a person so young could commit murder. None responded when Dist. Atty. James Daley asked the question during jury selection for the trial of the oldest of the three youngsters accused of beating and stabbing Anthony Darnell Wilson.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | JOSEPH N. BELL
Arnold Binder got a great deal of attention from some unexpected quarters recently when he published a college textbook entitled "Juvenile Delinquency: Historical, Cultural, Legal Perspectives" (written in collaboration with associates Gilbert Geis and Dickson Bruce). An enterprising UC Irvine publicist, exploring the book for newsworthy angles, discovered that the three academicians cited "the way the family carries out its business" as a prime factor in juvenile delinquency.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
With more than half of all Los Angeles crime committed by juveniles, some law enforcement professionals are going back to school to find new ways of keeping youths out of trouble and out of the criminal justice system. Clyde L. Cronkhite, director of USC's Delinquency Control Institute, said Los Angeles police arrested more than 26,000 juveniles last year.
WORLD
June 24, 2005 | Amberin Zaman, Special to The Times
Deniz was 10 when he committed his first crime. "I stole a few candy bars. It was pretty easy," recalled the gaunt teenager, his speech slurred by chronic drug abuse. "Now I do cellphones." Deniz, who just turned 17, is part of a swelling band of juvenile criminals roaming the streets of this predominantly Kurdish city of 1.5 million people in Turkey's impoverished southeast. Delinquents are blamed for a skyrocketing number of pedestrian muggings, car thefts and home robberies.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court on Friday agreed to decide the constitutionality of a novel state law that allows the prosecution of parents who willingly allow their children to become delinquents. The justices, granting a review of an appeal by Los Angeles officials, set aside a ruling last December by a state appellate court, which found that the 1988 parental responsibility law was impermissibly vague.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2001
Re "Looking Past Teenagers' Offenses," Personal Best, Feb. 22. Our volunteer graffiti-removal team donates their nights, weekends and holidays and much time from their families to remove the damage done by many of those that Robert Underhill entertains. While Underhill feeds cupcakes to young miscreants, we miss our dinners to scrub tagging and gang provocation from murals that dozens of good kids gave their weekends to create. Juvenile delinquent status in Los Angeles County is even more protective of offenders than diplomatic immunity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the one way Diedra Lampley could think of to ensure that bureaucrats in the criminal justice system would never forget her foster son was loved. At Wednesday's sentencing of his killers, she asked that a photograph be included in the court files. The snapshot was not the smiling Little League mug of Rodney Haynes she wears on a button on her lapel; it is a photo of his gravestone. "I wanted them to know that somebody had feelings for Rodney," Lampley said after the brief hearing.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was "a wild and crazy thought," adolescent specialist Ruth Herman Wells of Woodburn, Ore., recalled, the notion that "maybe, just possibly, girls might have special needs." With sturdy, grass-roots support, Oregon's Equal Access for Girls Task Force was born, and in 1993,Oregon became the first state to enact legislation addressing the serious shortage of services for troubled girls.
NEWS
January 27, 1996
Solomon Kobrin, 85, an educator who was a pioneer in combating juvenile delinquency. The Chicago native attended the universities of Wisconsin and Chicago and earned his doctorate at USC, where he taught until his retirement in 1975. He was a past president of the Illinois Academy of Criminology and the Assn. for Criminal Justice Research, and had been a consultant to the President's Committee on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, and to the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1995 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Rev. Jesse Jackson finished his 40-minute oration, there was silence in the brick chapel where the toughest juveniles of the local detention center gathered Friday. Jackson had spoken of hope and of the power to change. He had the youngsters kneel and pray. At least two wept. And they repeated at Jackson's command the phrases: "I want to go home. I want to leave dope and guns and gangs and violence behind. I choose life over death."
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They knocked the drunk down and beat in his face with paving stones, kicking him and punching him with all the viciousness coiled in their wiry boys' bodies, until his rattling grunts stopped. They watched him die. Then the three Yakovlev brothers, all younger than 15 at the time, cleaned out his pockets--although they did not kill him to rob him, said the youngest.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | United Press International
Teen-agers' consumption of junk food and soft drinks are to blame for the rise in soccer hooliganism, delinquency and weekend rural rowdiness, two leading nutritionists said in a report published today. "You cannot hope for good behavior on a junk-food diet, whatever social improvements are made. If only the government, (soccer) authorities and schools realized this, we could start to make progress," said Dr. Damian Downing and Ian Stokes of the British Society for Nutritional Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
Re "Report Calls for New Juvenile Justice Complex," Dec. 18. While Ventura County officials plan for a new and very expensive juvenile justice center, I hope they don't forget what should be a key element in working with troubled and dependent youths: a well-organized program of delinquency prevention and rehabilitation. While serving as chairman of the Santa Barbara County Juvenile Justice Commission and Delinquency Prevention Commission during the 1970s, I observed that many youths who were retained in the county's correctional facilities returned to their troubled lifestyle soon after their release.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1994 | ALEX DOMINGUEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After proving that a reform school kid can become a millionaire, James Hindman wants to show juvenile delinquents they can be successful and that he can make a profit setting them straight. The 58-year-old founder of Jiffy Lube has taken over one of the state of Maryland's biggest headaches, the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, a reform school plagued by escapes, crowded conditions and attacks on employees.
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