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Juvenile Delinquents

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NEWS
November 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Growing up in a single-parent or broken home is not likely to lead to juvenile delinquency, a study by a University of Cincinnati criminal justice professor shows. Patricia Van Voorhis says she found that poor quality home life is what leads to delinquent behavior, regardless of whether the family is intact. She found that physical abuse, conflict, lack of affection, minimal supervision and little enjoyment in the home lead to delinquency.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Department of Justice will continue for at least another year to oversee reforms at Los Angeles County's 14 juvenile probation camps, under an agreement announced Thursday. In 2008, the county's Probation Department accepted federal monitoring after being threatened with a takeover unless it did more to prevent youth suicides, stop employees from harming juvenile delinquents and improve rehabilitative services. The oversight was set to expire this month. The Probation Department was required to fulfill 41 reforms in its juvenile justice system, including improving staffing levels, decreasing violence and reducing the number of use-of-force incidents.
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SPORTS
November 10, 1989 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Morris (Mo) Freedman coaches the unbeaten Camp Kilpatrick Mustangs, who play eight-man high school football and do all the things other players do except go home after practice. That's because the Mustangs are certified juvenile delinquents, first-time offenders incarcerated for five or six months at the fenced-in county facility in the rugged Santa Monica Mountains above Malibu.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal
They shuffled in single-file lines -- heads lowered -- as they made their way to the gymnasium. For these incarcerated youths at the Central Juvenile Hall facility in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, it was time for lunch . . . and a bit of opera? "When would a girl like me ever hear opera?" said a female detainee, dressed in the facility's gray uniform, her hair pulled back in a bun. That was the point. In a first for the detention center, three members of Los Angeles Opera performed Friday afternoon for about 100 or so incarcer- ated teens as part of the "writer's retreat" conducted by InsideOUT Writers, or IOW, a nonprofit program that teaches creative writing to kids in L.A. County's juvenile hall system.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They knocked the drunk down and beat in his face with paving stones, kicking him and punching him with all the viciousness coiled in their wiry boys' bodies, until his rattling grunts stopped. They watched him die. Then the three Yakovlev brothers, all younger than 15 at the time, cleaned out his pockets--although they did not kill him to rob him, said the youngest.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was "a wild and crazy thought," adolescent specialist Ruth Herman Wells of Woodburn, Ore., recalled, the notion that "maybe, just possibly, girls might have special needs." With sturdy, grass-roots support, Oregon's Equal Access for Girls Task Force was born, and in 1993,Oregon became the first state to enact legislation addressing the serious shortage of services for troubled girls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Department of Justice will continue for at least another year to oversee reforms at Los Angeles County's 14 juvenile probation camps, under an agreement announced Thursday. In 2008, the county's Probation Department accepted federal monitoring after being threatened with a takeover unless it did more to prevent youth suicides, stop employees from harming juvenile delinquents and improve rehabilitative services. The oversight was set to expire this month. The Probation Department was required to fulfill 41 reforms in its juvenile justice system, including improving staffing levels, decreasing violence and reducing the number of use-of-force incidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1986
The San Diego County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday not to withdraw from its contract with VisionQuest, the juvenile reform program that uses cross-country wagon train treks and other challenging outdoor activities to rehabilitate juvenile delinquents. The decision to extend the contract beyond its expiration, on Friday, was unanimous and was made without discussion.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | United Press International
Former Budget Director David A. Stockman said today that the federal budget deficit reduction package was voted down by "windbags and juvenile delinquents." Stockman, calling the 254-179 vote an "appalling tragedy," said the deal reached at the budget summit was "a masterpiece of political compromise." The former congressman served as President Ronald Reagan's director of the Office of Management and Budget from 1981 to '85.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995 | From Associated Press
Some youngsters may be just a few steady heartbeats away from a life of crime, according to a USC study that links lower physical arousal traits with future lawlessness. The study of juvenile delinquents found that if it takes more to make them sweat or speed their heartbeat, they are more inclined to continue a life of crime than juvenile delinquents with normal arousal rates. "We think if you have low levels of arousal, you're seeking out levels of stimulation to bring levels to normal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2007 | Sandy Banks, Times Staff Writer
FROM her first glance, Dayna Bennett knew that Casey was not the kind of kid featured in adoption brochures. Fifteen and a spindly 6 feet 2, he was so unkempt and forlorn, he "looked like a ragamuffin" when they met in the visiting room of a state mental hospital three years ago. Bennett knew his history: Casey had been removed from abusive parents at age 6 and spent eight years in foster care, shuttled among relatives, strangers and group homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2007 | Sandy Banks, Times Staff Writer
Finding adoptive homes for teenage foster kids has always been a challenge. Most languish in foster care until they "age out" at 18, and many of those wind up unemployed, homeless or in jail. For foster children with criminal histories, the situation is even bleaker. Their crimes are typically disciplinary infractions or fighting, running away, vandalism or stealing, actions that might get a teenager with parents grounded but get a youth in foster care hauled off by police.
HEALTH
March 5, 2007 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
TEENS who lose their virginity earlier than their peers are more likely to steal, destroy property, shoplift or sell drugs than their virgin counterparts, according to one of the first studies to look at what happens in the lives of teens in the years after they start having sex.
OPINION
March 3, 2007
ANYONE STRUGGLING to understand the challenges and failures of Los Angeles in 2007 need look no further than the Tale of the Santee Tagger. It goes something like this: Students are harassed as they walk the two blocks from a bus stop to the Santee Education Complex. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa responds by putting a new stop closer to the school, then stages a media event to tout the accomplishment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Promise yourself ... to be so strong that nothing can disturb your peace of mind. As boys they saw it hanging from the walls of the dining hall, recited it in unison with other boys, heard it intoned at every special event like a prayer: Promise yourself ... to think only of the best, to work only for the best and to expect only the best.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities Thursday apprehended a second teenager who escaped from a county probation camp this week, the Probation Department reported. The teen and another youth broke out of Camp Afflerbaugh in the hills above the San Gabriel Valley on Tuesday. The other escapee was caught Wednesday. Over the last week, eight teenage inmates have escaped while under the supervision of the Probation Department, which runs the county's juvenile detention system. As of Thursday, five remained at large.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1990 | JIM NEWTON
After a week of behind-the-scenes negotiations, aides to several county supervisors said Monday that a deal appears near to give a highly touted program for juvenile delinquents the money it needs to expand. Backers of the Shortstop Program had appealed a county advisory group's decision not to include the program in a grant proposal for next year. The program had asked for money to add a Spanish-language operation to its existing English-language service.
NEWS
June 12, 1985
Child abuse and sexual exploitation of children have reached epidemic proportions in Los Angeles, straining the resources of the Police Department's juvenile division with a 261% increase in cases over the last decade, the unit's commander said Tuesday. Capt. John White told the Los Angeles Police Commission that there are 14 field detectives in his division to deal with criminal child abuse cases totaling 3,346 in 1984, compared to 927 cases in 1974, when the unit had 12 investigators.
WORLD
February 6, 2006 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
The headline screamed: "Girl Who Killed for Kicks Aged 14." The girl in question, green-eyed, auburn-haired Chelsea O'Mahoney, and her crew went on a "happy slap" rampage along London's South Bank one night 15 months ago. In less than an hour, they beat, kicked and stomped eight random victims. O'Mahoney filmed it with her cellphone to add to the teenage gang's only motive -- thrill. One man died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2005 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Deonta Black was hanging with gangbangers and selling weed around Perris just a few years ago, trying to scrape together what he calls a "little fame on the streets." The 18-year-old landed in juvenile hall for nine months. He was angry. He talked back. So authorities shipped him to Optimist Youth Homes & Family Services, a Highland Park group home for at-risk or abused kids -- many of whom are on probation -- to finish high school.
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