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Juvenile Delinquents

NEWS
February 21, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN and JOEL SAPPELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Most of his friends figured he would die a hero, because when disaster erupted in the eastern Sierra Nevada, Vidar Anderson was almost always there. Forest fires, plane crashes, mountain rescues--these were like a call to arms for Anderson, 58, a volunteer member of the Long Valley Fire Department. Tall and wiry, the retired school bus driver would invariably be the first on the scene. He was aggressive, friends and colleagues said, selfless, and ever calm in the face of danger.
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NEWS
June 14, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling for better treatment of youngsters confined at Orange County Juvenile Hall, a judge ordered the county Wednesday to obey strict new rules before throwing adolescent detainees into padded rooms or cuffing them to their beds. Superior Court Judge Linda H. McLaughlin concluded that such disciplinary methods--when imposed by unqualified people and conducted without proper supervision--violates the teen-agers' constitutional right to be free from bodily restraint.
NEWS
November 20, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case was chilling. A woman had been raped, then stabbed in the chest. The victim had lived to tell about it. And the jury of 12 had found the defendant guilty. Afterward, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Roosevelt Dorn retreated to his chambers to ponder the sentencing of this man whose criminal record began in his early teens. It was the kind of case that distressed the judge--another face that mirrored the failures of the juvenile justice system.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Forest Service, the agency with jurisdiction over Convict Lake, has set no standards for ice thickness, air temperature or other conditions to be met before the public is allowed to venture onto the frozen lake, a spokesman for the Forest Service said Tuesday.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | JIM CARLTON and JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The consulting psychiatrist for Camp O'Neal, the Sierra Nevada home for troubled youth central to the Convict Lake tragedy in which seven people drowned last month, was arrested Thursday in Newport Beach on suspicion of sexually abusing an adult patient. Newport Beach police also served search warrants at Dr. James Harrington White's Newport Beach clinic, his Newport Beach home and his other residences in Palm Desert and Mammoth Lakes, near Camp O'Neal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The four teen-agers sauntered down a darkened Long Beach street until they reached a delivery truck parked at the curb. Three of the four stationed themselves as lookouts. The fourth approached the truck's broad white side. He produced a spray can from under his coat and painted in quick, deft strokes. Moments later, the only trace of the outlaws was their handiwork: a string of black, stylized letters marking the fleeting presence of these vandals of the night. Time elapsed: about 20 seconds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1987 | ANDREA ESTEPA and MARILYN GARATEIX, Times Staff Writers
The first two suspects weren't hard to miss. They were hurling bottles at four police cars trolling 67th Street near Kansas Avenue. As the bottles fell, missing their targets, beams from police flashlights caught two youths jumping over a fence. This time youthful agility was no match for a hard-cornering car. The chase ended in a yard on 66th Street. 'Freeze!' yelled officer Rosemary Sanchez, her gun drawn. The two teen-agers stopped, not even daring to look back. It was a little past 10 p.m.
NEWS
June 12, 1987 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Police Officer Manny Rodriguez was warned by Palm Springs High School authorities that Elika Staggs was trouble. "They said, 'He's bad; he'll hurt you if he can and he's been booked for attempted murder,' " recalled Detective Rodriguez, 34, who was then a campus officer. "He hated himself and the world." The cop and the kid met a few weeks later in late September, 1985, when Staggs was threatening a group of students and a bus driver with a knife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Curfews are hardly a new crime-fighting idea. In the 9th century, English King Alfred the Great ordered his subjects to cover their fires (the word curfew is derived from old English for cover and fire) and retire when the evening bell rang. Now politicians nationwide have instituted youth curfews to curb juvenile crime or at least make points with crime-weary voters. Just last week the Los Angeles Police Commission ordered curfews be enforced in Northridge and four other areas.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A peacock tattooed on James' forearm covers up the Spanish words Mi Vida Loca --My Crazy Life. A butterfly tattooed on the back of the 16-year-old's neck covers the insignia of his former gang, the Dead End Locals of the Central Valley town of Merced. These new tattoos covering old tattoos are a sign of James' rehabilitation, say the operators of the Remi Vista group homes for troubled teen-agers here in this Northern California city of 70,000.
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