Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJuvenile Institution
IN THE NEWS

Juvenile Institution

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1996 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying Los Angeles County is in "significant financial distress," a state panel tentatively ruled Tuesday that county officials can slash general relief payments by 25% to more than 90,000 poor and homeless recipients. Relieved county officials--desperate to ease their worst-ever financial crisis--hailed the decision. They already have spent $25 million of the anticipated savings by cutting minimum welfare payments during the rest of the fiscal year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1996 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying Los Angeles County is in "significant financial distress," a state panel tentatively ruled Tuesday that county officials can slash general relief payments by 25% to more than 90,000 poor and homeless recipients. Relieved county officials--desperate to ease their worst-ever financial crisis--hailed the decision. They already have spent $25 million of the anticipated savings by cutting minimum welfare payments during the rest of the fiscal year.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 21, 1989
The California Youth Authority's Southern Reception Center and Clinic, a nonprofit juvenile institution, is seeking donations during the holiday season for incarcerated youthful offenders. Donations of money will be used to purchase gifts for wards who do not receive presents or visits from family members. Gifts, such as portable radios and cassette players, stationery, paperback books, magazines, toiletry items and candy will be accepted.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Three boys were arrested in St. Paul, Minn., in the alleged gang rape of an 8-year-old girl. Four other suspects were too young for prosecution. The three boys, ages 10, 11 and 13, were being held at a juvenile detention center on preliminary charges of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. The boys must be charged within 48 hours. Because the boys are under 14, they cannot be tried as adults. If convicted, they could be confined in a juvenile institution until they turn 19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1989
In response to "Girl's 911 Call Led to a New Life of Turmoil," Metro, March 5: There is something basically wrong and quite frightening with a system under which youngsters are programmed to turn to police instead of their own families or other available agencies for help (even if the cause of their problems are with members of their own family). The government's role should be to do everything possible to help keep a family together. The officer's instruction to young Terah Beth Cortez to ". . . Go back home and act like nothing happened . . ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill by an Orange County lawmaker that would allow the paddling of juvenile graffiti vandals appeared headed for victory late Wednesday in a key Assembly committee. Although the Appropriations Committee had yet to conduct a final vote on the measure by Assemblyman Mickey Conroy (R-Orange), he confidently predicted that he had the votes, setting up what promises to be a raucous partisan debate on the Assembly floor next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A public high school slated to open here next fall may require students to wear uniforms under a proposal being debated by Antelope Valley Union School District officials. The idea of requiring uniforms at the new campus surfaced Wednesday during a school board discussion of a new state law that allows districts to require school uniforms. After deciding the idea had merit, the board instructed its staff to prepare a school uniform policy for a vote next month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1993 | Times researcher CATHERINE GOTTLIEB
A model program in Ventura County helps keep the most vulnerable children out of institutions while containing the county's costs of care. BACKGROUND It costs the state an average of $32,000 for each Juvenile Court ward or dependent child placed in an out-of-home setting--a group home or other juvenile institution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1995 | Dana Parsons
"What percentage of murders do you think are committed by people under 18?" asked Howard Snyder, an official with the National Center for Juvenile Justice. I had no idea, but with images of epidemic teen violence in my brain, I estimated 30%. "Nine percent," Snyder said. "For all violent crime, it's somewhere around 12 to 13%." That's hardly cause for rejoicing, but I was glad to be that far off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2003 | Karin Grennan, Special to The Times
Twice a week, the strum and screech of violins, violas and cellos emanate from the Frank A. Colston Youth Center in Ventura. Behind chain-link fences and barbed wire, teenagers with rap sheets and gang tattoos are learning scales and simple tunes like "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" in a strings class so popular that many waited weeks, even months, before a spot opened up.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11th-grade honors students at University High School were ready with index cards full of questions. But there was one question they all shared: How can a shy white woman with a slight build and a voice to match step into the man-sized shoes of a large, forthright, black woman and tell her story? "I didn't make that choice," replied novelist Susan Straight. Some of her characters grew from seeds her African American mother-in-law planted in her brain, she said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|