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Juvenile Institutions California

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linking his tough new stance on juvenile crime with maintaining the county's youth probation camps, Gov. Pete Wilson signed a bill in Burbank Friday to keep the camps open and "prevent the release of 1,400 teen-age thugs." At a news conference at Burbank Airport, Wilson said the county's system of 19 camps are important for deterrance of juvenile crime. "Los Angeles, like many towns and cities . . . seems to be under a siege of juvenile crime," Wilson said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 16-year-old boy on Tuesday became the first defendant in Orange County to be charged under a controversial state law that allows district attorneys to bypass Juvenile Court and immediately prosecute minors as adults. Carlos Sanchez is accused of fatally wounding a 67-year-old Santa Ana woman during a drive-by shooting over the weekend.
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NEWS
June 10, 1998 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buffeted by reports of troubles in California's child welfare system, state lawmakers are considering an $81-million plan to improve oversight and care for abused, abandoned and delinquent children. Among the areas targeted for attention is the over-medication of some of the 15,000 children housed in the state's network of group homes. A state task force has also proposed an increase in funding for more frequent social worker visits to ensure that children are receiving proper care.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are no one's angels: The girl who pounds and pounds her head against the wall or the one who shoves staples, pencils and spoons up her nose and under her skin; the boy who lights fires, threatens to kill and still wets his bed. Their crimes have made them wards of Los Angeles' Central Juvenile Hall and poster children--if it's possible to remember they are children--for the breakdown in California's mental health system.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are no one's angels: The girl who pounds and pounds her head against the wall or the one who shoves staples, pencils and spoons up her nose and under her skin; the boy who lights fires, threatens to kill and still wets his bed. Their crimes have made them wards of Los Angeles' Central Juvenile Hall and poster children--if it's possible to remember they are children--for the breakdown in California's mental health system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 16-year-old boy on Tuesday became the first defendant in Orange County to be charged under a controversial state law that allows district attorneys to bypass Juvenile Court and immediately prosecute minors as adults. Carlos Sanchez is accused of fatally wounding a 67-year-old Santa Ana woman during a drive-by shooting over the weekend.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buffeted by reports of troubles in California's child welfare system, state lawmakers are considering an $81-million plan to improve oversight and care for abused, abandoned and delinquent children. Among the areas targeted for attention is the over-medication of some of the 15,000 children housed in the state's network of group homes. A state task force has also proposed an increase in funding for more frequent social worker visits to ensure that children are receiving proper care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linking his tough new stance on juvenile crime with maintaining the county's youth probation camps, Gov. Pete Wilson signed a bill in Burbank Friday to keep the camps open and "prevent the release of 1,400 teen-age thugs." At a news conference at Burbank Airport, Wilson said the county's system of 19 camps are important for deterrance of juvenile crime. "Los Angeles, like many towns and cities . . . seems to be under a siege of juvenile crime," Wilson said.
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