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November 1, 1996 | JAMES RAINEY and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State officials have moved to close a home for troubled teenagers, saying the staff could not control the youths who ran amok in a series of incidents and crimes that culminated in what police called a "mini-riot." The state's action came Wednesday after the county had already removed the 68 teenagers from Pride House, a facility in the 15300 block of Saticoy Street for abused and neglected adolescents and petty criminals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Sunday afternoon, more than an hour since Nelson Ulloa and his wife, Juana Pineiro, left their Hollywood home, and they still have a 40-minute walk to the Barry J. Nidorf Juvenile Hall to visit their son. The couple pay $3 each to take three Metropolitan Transportation Authority buses to arrive at the corner of Roxford Street and Glenoaks Boulevard. From there, they walk nearly two miles to the juvenile facility for the 1-to-4 p.m. visiting hours.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Sunday afternoon and more than an hour since Nelson Ulloa and his wife, Juana Pineiro, left their Hollywood home, and still they have a 40-minute walk to the Barry J. Nidorf Juvenile Hall in Sylmar to visit their son. The couple pay $3 each to take three Metropolitan Transportation Authority buses to arrive at the corner of Roxford Street and Glenoaks Boulevard. From there, they walk nearly two miles to the juvenile facility for the 1 to 4 p.m. visiting hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Sunday afternoon and more than an hour since Nelson Ulloa and his wife, Juana Pineiro, left their Hollywood home, and still they have a 40-minute walk to the Barry J. Nidorf Juvenile Hall in Sylmar to visit their son. The couple pay $3 each to take three Metropolitan Transportation Authority buses to arrive at the corner of Roxford Street and Glenoaks Boulevard. From there, they walk nearly two miles to the juvenile facility for the 1 to 4 p.m. visiting hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles City Council panel approved a plan Tuesday to open a new campus for juvenile offenders in a commercial district of Canoga Park, despite concerns about putting delinquents in close contact with stores and patrons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998
Police have caught one of two 15-year-old youths who used a ladder to escape from Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, authorities said Friday. Los Angeles Police Department officers arrested one of the boys, who was wearing an orange jumpsuit, Thursday evening, said Officer Don Cox. Probation authorities had called the youth a "high-risk" offender.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Sunday afternoon, more than an hour since Nelson Ulloa and his wife, Juana Pineiro, left their Hollywood home, and they still have a 40-minute walk to the Barry J. Nidorf Juvenile Hall to visit their son. The couple pay $3 each to take three Metropolitan Transportation Authority buses to arrive at the corner of Roxford Street and Glenoaks Boulevard. From there, they walk nearly two miles to the juvenile facility for the 1-to-4 p.m. visiting hours.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Nonpublic" schools. Even the name suggests something like an identity crisis. These little-known schools, which serve a growing number of disturbed children, are privately owned but funded almost entirely by taxpayers. They operate somewhere between public and private education, between free enterprise and government control. As a result, public oversight is lax and state standards sometimes shockingly low.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan, who has long argued for punishing juvenile offenders swiftly to deter them from committing crimes, visited a novel project Tuesday that has dramatically cut down the amount of time needed to bring youngsters to trial on minor offenses. The project, established to handle traffic, truancy and minor drug violations, reports an overwhelming success rate, and it left the initially skeptical mayor promising to seek expansion of the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles City Council panel approved a plan Tuesday to open a new campus for juvenile offenders in a commercial district of Canoga Park, despite concerns about putting delinquents in close contact with stores and patrons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998
Police have caught one of two 15-year-old youths who used a ladder to escape from Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, authorities said Friday. Los Angeles Police Department officers arrested one of the boys, who was wearing an orange jumpsuit, Thursday evening, said Officer Don Cox. Probation authorities had called the youth a "high-risk" offender.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan, who has long argued for punishing juvenile offenders swiftly to deter them from committing crimes, visited a novel project Tuesday that has dramatically cut down the amount of time needed to bring youngsters to trial on minor offenses. The project, established to handle traffic, truancy and minor drug violations, reports an overwhelming success rate, and it left the initially skeptical mayor promising to seek expansion of the program.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Nonpublic" schools. Even the name suggests something like an identity crisis. These little-known schools, which serve a growing number of disturbed children, are privately owned but funded almost entirely by taxpayers. They operate somewhere between public and private education, between free enterprise and government control. As a result, public oversight is lax and state standards sometimes shockingly low.
NEWS
November 1, 1996 | JAMES RAINEY and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State officials have moved to close a home for troubled teenagers, saying the staff could not control the youths who ran amok in a series of incidents and crimes that culminated in what police called a "mini-riot." The state's action came Wednesday after the county had already removed the 68 teenagers from Pride House, a facility in the 15300 block of Saticoy Street for abused and neglected adolescents and petty criminals.
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