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Juvenile Institutions Orange County

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NEWS
May 5, 1997 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group home for troubled teenagers is being forced off the grounds of UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange and castigated by government regulators after the alleged sexual assault of one boy and a series of other disturbing incidents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Orange County's probation program for juvenile repeat offenders has been recognized among eight nationwide by a policy forum in Washington, D.C. The program, called 8% Solution, identifies and treats juveniles most at risk of becoming chronic offenders. "We have long known that a small number of troubled youth account for the majority of all serious juvenile crimes," said Michael Schumacher, the county's chief executive and former chief probation officer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grand jury report released Wednesday says youngsters charged as adults had been locked up in the Central Men's Jail in Santa Ana without receiving state-mandated schooling or supervision from adequately trained staff. The report raises concerns about rehabilitating juveniles in facilities designed for adults, and comes as county prosecutors charge more and more juveniles as adults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grand jury report released Wednesday says youngsters charged as adults had been locked up in the Central Men's Jail in Santa Ana without receiving state-mandated schooling or supervision from adequately trained staff. The report raises concerns about rehabilitating juveniles in facilities designed for adults, and comes as county prosecutors charge more and more juveniles as adults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Probation officials see a proposed 90-bed camp in Trabuco Canyon as one answer to expected growth in teen crime. Modeled on an innovative New York state institution, and located next to the county's Joplin Youth Center, it would focus on bolstering the character of young offenders. But some canyon residents--unnerved by occasional phone calls warning of an escaped juvenile felon from Joplin--see something else: trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1997 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group foster home for disturbed teenagers--already being ousted from rented space at UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange--was hit Monday with two setbacks from state and local authorities that threaten its plan to relocate in Azusa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decision on a proposal to expand a youth detention facility near Trabuco Canyon was postponed Wednesday after dozens of canyon residents criticized the county Probation Department's plan and raised questions about escapee figures higher than earlier reported. Instead, the county Planning Commission postponed its decision until next Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995 | SHELBY GRAD
The county is moving forward with plans to construct a 30-bed addition to its juvenile detention facility in Orange. Plans for the $3.5-million project are now being finalized, and construction is expected to begin later this year. The new wing will probably be completed sometime in 1997, officials said. The detention hall is the largest of four county-run facilities for juveniles. It currently can house more than 300 offenders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Orange County's probation program for juvenile repeat offenders has been recognized among eight nationwide by a policy forum in Washington, D.C. The program, called 8% Solution, identifies and treats juveniles most at risk of becoming chronic offenders. "We have long known that a small number of troubled youth account for the majority of all serious juvenile crimes," said Michael Schumacher, the county's chief executive and former chief probation officer.
NEWS
May 21, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica's childhood is etched in shiny scar tissue. Each thin slash on her forearm is a memento of another stint in the county's home for abused kids. Each lumpy burn--a smiley face seared with the metal top of a disposable cigarette lighter--another group home that didn't work out. "Some were because I wanted to make my mom feel bad," Jessica says. "Some were because my life sucks." Since Jessica was a toddler, social workers and police officers have never been far from her life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decision on a proposal to expand a youth detention facility near Trabuco Canyon was postponed Wednesday after dozens of canyon residents criticized the county Probation Department's plan and raised questions about escapee figures higher than earlier reported. Instead, the county Planning Commission postponed its decision until next Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County probation officials will lobby the U.S. Forest Service today to renew a special use permit for the 125-bed Los Pinos Conservation Camp for juvenile offenders in the Cleveland National Forest. County officials have been so nervous about possibly losing the camp's permit that the Board of Supervisors rushed through a resolution this week urging the federal government to allow Los Pinos to remain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Probation officials see a proposed 90-bed camp in Trabuco Canyon as one answer to expected growth in teen crime. Modeled on an innovative New York state institution, and located next to the county's Joplin Youth Center, it would focus on bolstering the character of young offenders. But some canyon residents--unnerved by occasional phone calls warning of an escaped juvenile felon from Joplin--see something else: trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A youth advocacy group Monday sued Orange County, alleging that its Orangewood Children's Home has held some abused and neglected children longer than legally allowed and in overcrowded conditions that can cause "severe and permanent psychological and physical harm."
NEWS
June 18, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children in foster care and group homes are returning to Orangewood Children's Home at an alarming rate, and they are entering county custody with more serious problems than in previous years, according to an Orange County Grand Jury report released Wednesday. After studying admission and placement processes at Orangewood, the grand jury cited the shrinking pool of available foster parents and increasing numbers of children in need.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosie perches on a chair in the lime green interview room. She is alone, save for a giant Winnie the Pooh propped in a corner. Under the room's bright lights, she looks younger than her 12 years, all wide eyes and spindly arms wrapped in a T-shirt lettered L-O-V-E. Behind a two-way mirror, Nieves Monge hunches her bulky frame inches from the glass. She's on autopilot, in her seen-it-all social worker mode. Just another case. A video camera rolls to record Rosie's family secret.
NEWS
July 4, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County psychiatrists at the Orangewood Children's Home placed the health of young patients in jeopardy by prescribing powerful drugs without first recording diagnoses, failing to keep accurate charts of some patients and changing drugs with great frequency, according to a highly critical report by the Juvenile Justice Commission.
NEWS
June 18, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children in foster care and group homes are returning to Orangewood Children's Home at an alarming rate, and they are entering county custody with more serious problems than in previous years, according to an Orange County Grand Jury report released Wednesday. After studying admission and placement processes at Orangewood, the grand jury cited the shrinking pool of available foster parents and increasing numbers of children in need.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marble-faced in sea-foam green and tan, the Betty Lou Lamoreaux Juvenile Justice Center looks like the headquarters of a prosperous Southern California corporation. An atrium rises seven floors at the building's center, the courtrooms boast cushy theatrical seating and the corridors gleam. By 9:15 a.m., its hallways reek of dirty clothes, soiled diapers and nervous sweat. A man swats his wife with a roll of court papers, hissing, "Keep your mouth shut."
NEWS
May 21, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica's childhood is etched in shiny scar tissue. Each thin slash on her forearm is a memento of another stint in the county's home for abused kids. Each lumpy burn--a smiley face seared with the metal top of a disposable cigarette lighter--another group home that didn't work out. "Some were because I wanted to make my mom feel bad," Jessica says. "Some were because my life sucks." Since Jessica was a toddler, social workers and police officers have never been far from her life.
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