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Juvenile Institutions

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2006 | Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writer
Girls in trouble with the law in Orange County are being taught how to act, dress and even salsa as part of an ambitious project to boost their self-esteem and provide them with the basic social skills and support they will need to lead productive lives.
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NEWS
September 10, 1991 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Jorge Estrada!" A Mexican immigration official searched the roomful of boys for the one she wanted. Sullen-faced, in heavy-metal T-shirts and worn pants, the boys stared back. They were the weekly group of illegal immigrant children deported to Mexico from Los Angeles and Orange counties, where they had been arrested, mostly for stealing. Every Thursday morning they arrive, bleary-eyed from the trip, shuffling into the Mexican immigration office at the Otay Mesa border crossing in Tijuana.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | MARK GLADSTONE and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At least eight times in the last three years, unruly wards at the state's El Paso de Robles Youth Correctional Facility were marched into the prison gymnasium, placed in handcuffs and made to kneel, sometimes until their legs went numb. The young men, some of whom were on and off their knees through the day, settled onto thin mattresses at night. But sleep did not come easily. Guards performed "cuff checks" on the hour; some wards who dozed off complained that they were kicked awake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1990 | JOHN KENDALL and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A teen-age escapee suspected of aiding six violent-crime suspects to flee the county's Central Juvenile Hall last week by smashing a car through a utility gate has been arrested, authorities said Tuesday. Los Angeles Police Detective Lt. Robert Barker said Barry Mortis, 17, was arrested on a fugitive warrant Sunday at a house near 61st Street and Vernon Avenue. Mortis refused to come out of the house at first, but eventually surrendered without incident, Barker said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2006 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
For more than a decade, Los Angeles County's governing supervisors have been repeatedly warned about problems in the county's mammoth detention system for juvenile offenders. But despite at least 16 studies, investigations or audits since 1998 -- exposing serious deficiencies with schooling, mental health services and basic safety -- the county's elected leaders have done little to meaningfully improve California's largest juvenile detention system, records show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998
A public interest law firm filed a lawsuit in federal court Wednesday against Los Angeles County, claiming that the probation department discriminates against deaf youths by denying them the same programs and opportunities for rehabilitation as the other inmates in juvenile facilities. The Center for Law in the Public Interest alleges in its lawsuit that the county has failed to comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A soft-spoken teen-ager sat on the couch in the group home where he has lived for three years and described why sometimes, despite all the attention he receives from the staff, he cannot control his temper. "I can be very nice one minute, and the next minute I can blow off the handle," said Terrence, 16, who has lived in foster homes and residential care facilities since he was a toddler. "It happens when I think about my past. Why did it have to be me going to a group home?
NATIONAL
April 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
More than 600 cases of abuse or neglect have taken place at state juvenile detention centers in the last decade, with nearly two-thirds occurring since 2000, the Orlando Sentinel reported. The 661 confirmed cases at Department of Juvenile Justice facilities since 1994 were scattered across the state and range from physical to sexual abuse, according to the newspaper's review of state records. C.
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