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OPINION
November 13, 2002
Re "Ashcroft Says Sniper Suspects Will Be Tried First in Virginia," Nov. 8: What does it say about our society that we are one of only two or three countries in the world that will execute a convicted juvenile, and that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft and other government officials are searching to find the fastest way to convict and execute a juvenile? After the events of Sept. 11 we still have not taken a moment to look at ourselves and the image we present to the world. Dave Skibinski Altadena
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Alex Hribal, the 16-year-old suspect in a stabbing spree at a Pennsylvania high school, has been charged as an adult by local prosecutors. That's not unusual. According to the National Juvenile Justice Network, an estimated 200,000 minors are tried, sentenced or incarcerated as adults in the United States every year. Those numbers reflect a trend dating back to the 1990s, when states started making it easier to divert adolescents accused of some crimes from the juvenile justice system - where the overriding objective is rehabilitation - to the adult criminal justice system, which emphasizes retribution and deterrence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Department of Justice will continue for at least another year to oversee reforms at Los Angeles County's 14 juvenile probation camps, under an agreement announced Thursday. In 2008, the county's Probation Department accepted federal monitoring after being threatened with a takeover unless it did more to prevent youth suicides, stop employees from harming juvenile delinquents and improve rehabilitative services. The oversight was set to expire this month. The Probation Department was required to fulfill 41 reforms in its juvenile justice system, including improving staffing levels, decreasing violence and reducing the number of use-of-force incidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County supervisors are considering an overhaul of the county's system for defending juveniles accused of crimes. Under-age criminal defendants who can't afford a lawyer are generally represented by someone from the county public defender's office. But when that office is already representing another defendant in the case or a special circumstance arises, lawyers from a separate panel step in to remove the potential conflict of interest. Advocates argue that the switch creates another problem: The private lawyers the county contracts with for these cases, known as panel attorneys, are paid less - a flat rate of $319 to $345 per case - and may not represent their clients as vigorously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2000 | BILL STAMPS, Bill Stamps is a probation officer in Los Angeles County
About 15 years ago, I supervised a very young 14-year-old boy who had killed his mother's lover. It was a horrible death. The victim was set on fire and burned alive. What this young man did was barbaric, but he was not a "true" criminal. Fortunately for him, the court recognized his immaturity and committed him to a juvenile residential treatment program. After about three years, he returned to the community, where he subsequently graduated from high school and college.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
More than 600 cases of abuse or neglect have taken place at state juvenile detention centers in the last decade, with nearly two-thirds occurring since 2000, the Orlando Sentinel reported. The 661 confirmed cases at Department of Juvenile Justice facilities since 1994 were scattered across the state and range from physical to sexual abuse, according to the newspaper's review of state records. C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR
Ventura County Superior Court and Corrections Services Agency officials are looking for people of different ages, races, genders and social classes to serve on the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Commission. The commission is made up of nine to 15 people who represent a cross-section of county residents. At least two of the members must be between the ages of 14 and 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1998 | DAVID HALDANE
Orange County's juvenile justice system follows the law so strictly that it sometimes fails to accommodate differences among cases, according to a grand jury report released Monday. "The protection of juvenile rights is sometimes compromised by the county's strict application of statutes," according to a press release outlining the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001
A divided state appeals court upheld 2 to 1 a sweeping juvenile justice law approved by voters last year, ruling that the measure does not violate rules requiring that an initiative cover only one subject. The 4th District Court of Appeal issued the ruling in the case of Charles "Andy" Williams, who was 15 when he allegedly shot and killed two students and wounded 13 others in March at a high school in the San Diego suburb of Santee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local civil rights leaders called on Gov. Gray Davis on Wednesday to address racial disparities in the transfer of juvenile criminal cases to adult courts, citing a new study showing that minority youths in Los Angeles County are more likely to be tried as adults than white youths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Rick Rojas and Joseph Serna
A hearing began Friday to determine where a 13-year-old boy found guilty of killing his neo-Nazi father will spend the next decade of his life. Prosecutors are arguing that he be placed in a state-run juvenile justice center, but his attorneys say such facilities are not equipped to handle the boy's severe emotional and social disabilities. They have proposed other options, including private facilities. A Riverside County judge found in January that the boy - who was 10 when he shot his father, Jeffrey Hall, in the head as he slept on a couch in the family's living room - possessed the mental capacity to know that killing his father was wrong.
OPINION
May 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
At probation camps and juvenile halls, where delinquent minors are often held, officials sometimes have no choice but to temporarily isolate disruptive juveniles for the safety of other youths and camp personnel. But as an hour turns into a day or more - and reports from some camps and halls suggest it can turn into a week or a month - temporary isolation turns into solitary confinement, a brutal practice when employed against anyone, and an especially cruel way to treat a juvenile who is still developing and does not yet have the emotional skills to bounce back from such treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
Marcus Bell knows how important Los Angeles County courts are for at-risk youths. Bell, a gang intervention and prevention worker in South Los Angeles, has worked hard with young people, trying to get them not to run from police. He has worked to get them to deal with their legal issues responsibly instead of avoiding court appearances so they don't end up with warrants issued against them at a young age. On Saturday, Bell said he worries about the Los Angeles County Superior Court's cost-cutting plan that includes closing Kenyon Juvenile Justice Center in South L.A. In the coming months, the juvenile court will be one of eight regional courthouses closing as the court system struggles to close an $85-million budget shortfall by July 1, the beginning of the next fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Latrice lifts the sleeve of her gray sweatshirt to reveal small, dark lines - scars from slicing her forearm over and over to drown out pain from years of sexual abuse. She says she was an alcoholic, dropped out of school in the eighth grade and got pregnant at 16. Now 18, she is in Los Angeles County's juvenile justice system because she violated probation. Latrice says she has been locked up more than 20 times in four years. Petite and talkative, she has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and takes antidepressants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Department of Justice will continue for at least another year to oversee reforms at Los Angeles County's 14 juvenile probation camps, under an agreement announced Thursday. In 2008, the county's Probation Department accepted federal monitoring after being threatened with a takeover unless it did more to prevent youth suicides, stop employees from harming juvenile delinquents and improve rehabilitative services. The oversight was set to expire this month. The Probation Department was required to fulfill 41 reforms in its juvenile justice system, including improving staffing levels, decreasing violence and reducing the number of use-of-force incidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Sentencing a juvenile offender to 110 years to life in prison for attempted murder is cruel and unusual punishment, the California Supreme Court ruled Thursday, striking down a sentence in a Los Angeles County case. The state high court's decision comes as courts across the nation are grappling with the ramifications of a 2010 U.S. Supreme Courtdecision that found it unconstitutional to sentence a juvenile convicted of a crime other than murder to life in prison without parole. In that case, Graham vs. Florida, the court ruled that young offenders should be given "some realistic opportunity" for release, citing "fundamental differences between juvenile and adult minds.
NEWS
May 12, 2012 | By Robert Greene
So what's the deal with Carmen Trutanich, anyway? Is he the goofy but dangerous loose cannon, power-hungry crazy man that so many former supporters love to hate? Or is he the reform-oriented outsider who, in his own description, made a few high-profile missteps in his first few months because he was unfamiliar with the culture of City Hall, and then settled down to be a solid administrator of an office that dispenses sound advice to city leaders and prosecutes dangerous criminals and nuisance violators?
OPINION
April 24, 2012
Over the last 10 years, California's juvenile justice system has begun to emerge from the darkest of its dark days. In settling lawsuits, the state agreed to turn away from inhumane practices and reduce youth prison violence, abide by laws that require educational and mental health and healthcare services, and provide access for the physically disabled. The state was caught physically abusing its wards, sometimes by looking the other way when fights broke out, sometimes by spurring the fights on, sometimes by guards actually beating the wards.
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