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NATIONAL
May 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The agency that runs the state's juvenile prison system said it would release 226 inmates after a review found their sentences were improperly extended. The review is one of many ongoing reforms to the state's juvenile system after the disclosure of allegations of sexual abuse of inmates by staff. Advocates for Texas Youth Commission inmates and their families have complained that sentences are often extended inconsistently or in retaliation for filing grievances.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld
The state is closing California's largest youth prison as the population of juvenile offenders in state custody continues to decline, corrections officials announced Thursday. The Heman G. Stark Youth Correctional Facility in Chino will be converted into an adult prison, state officials said. The move is part of a plan to "right-size" staff at the Division of Juvenile Justice, which is reducing its workforce by 400 employees by the end of this year to save the state up to $40 million, said Bernard Warner, the chief deputy secretary for the division.
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NEWS
May 27, 1998 | From Associated Press
Good behavior is no longer enough to get a parole recommendation from the California Youth Authority. CYA wards are now required to earn their high school diploma or the educational equivalent before being paroled. "It could [cost more] in the short term to keep someone a few months longer, but our long-range plan is, if they don't come back to us, it will save $34,000 a year," said CYA spokeswoman Sarah Ludeman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation will close two of the state's eight juvenile prisons by July. The department said Friday that the Dewitt Nelson Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton and El Paso de Robles Youth Correctional Facility in Paso Robles would close. Together they house about 400 inmates and employ about 800 workers. A declining juvenile prison population and a new state law that aims to keep less serious offenders in their communities prompted the closures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation will close two of the state's eight juvenile prisons by July. The department said Friday that the Dewitt Nelson Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton and El Paso de Robles Youth Correctional Facility in Paso Robles would close. Together they house about 400 inmates and employ about 800 workers. A declining juvenile prison population and a new state law that aims to keep less serious offenders in their communities prompted the closures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999
The director of the state prison system Wednesday suspended the top three administrators at scandal-plagued Ventura School after investigators found a two-decades-long pattern of mismanagement and sexual misconduct at the juvenile prison near Camarillo. Robert B. Presley, secretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, placed the administrators on paid leave pending a review of a scathing report released Wednesday by the state inspector general's office. School Supt.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Juvenile Justice Department suspended 14 employees at a Miami juvenile prison where a 17-year-old died of a burst appendix after being left untreated for three days. A department report said several Miami-Dade Regional Detention Center officers failed to provide emergency care to Omar Paisley in June after he was found in his cell vomiting and suffering from diarrhea. Paisley had complained he was ill a day after being jailed for cutting a neighbor with a soda can.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2004 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Already grappling with a staggering budget crisis, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger faces a growing consensus that the state's vast prison system is dysfunctional, corrupt and plagued by violence. This week a series of reports hammered the juvenile system on all fronts, including the "decrepit" condition of its facilities, the "stunning" level of violence within its walls, and the substandard medical and psychiatric care it provides wards, as young inmates are called.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
As a 2 1/2-year investigation of the scandal-plagued Ventura School neared completion Monday, officials at the juvenile prison said 15 employees have been fired or forced to resign for having improper relations with inmates. Five of the workers were forced out after California Youth Authority officials concluded they had sex with inmates, Supt. Greg Lowe said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1986 | JERRY BELCHER, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge on Tuesday ordered complete "sight and sound" separation of juveniles and adults in the booking room of the Los Angeles County sheriff's Norwalk Station. The ruling was hailed by the Public Justice Foundation as another victory in its statewide campaign to end what it calls the "barbaric" practice of locking up children with their elders in local jails. Frederick R. Bennett, principal deputy counsel for Los Angeles County, said he will appeal the ruling by Judge Jack M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
California has sentenced more juveniles to life in prison without possibility of parole than any state in the nation except Pennsylvania, according to a new study by the University of San Francisco's Center for Law and Global Justice. California currently has 227 inmates serving such sentences for crimes committed before they turned 18; Pennsylvania has 433.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The agency that runs the state's juvenile prison system said it would release 226 inmates after a review found their sentences were improperly extended. The review is one of many ongoing reforms to the state's juvenile system after the disclosure of allegations of sexual abuse of inmates by staff. Advocates for Texas Youth Commission inmates and their families have complained that sentences are often extended inconsistently or in retaliation for filing grievances.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Juvenile Justice Department suspended 14 employees at a Miami juvenile prison where a 17-year-old died of a burst appendix after being left untreated for three days. A department report said several Miami-Dade Regional Detention Center officers failed to provide emergency care to Omar Paisley in June after he was found in his cell vomiting and suffering from diarrhea. Paisley had complained he was ill a day after being jailed for cutting a neighbor with a soda can.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2004 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Already grappling with a staggering budget crisis, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger faces a growing consensus that the state's vast prison system is dysfunctional, corrupt and plagued by violence. This week a series of reports hammered the juvenile system on all fronts, including the "decrepit" condition of its facilities, the "stunning" level of violence within its walls, and the substandard medical and psychiatric care it provides wards, as young inmates are called.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2003 | Sandy Banks, Times Staff Writer
Wearing yellow visitors badges and an air of resignation, the couple make their way through locked gates at the Fred C. Nelles Youth Correctional Facility in Whittier, past lines of denim-clad young men and on to the prison's library. Inside, Ruett Foster tries to meet each set of eyes, as 20 inmates file in and take their seats around the library tables.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
As a 2 1/2-year investigation of the scandal-plagued Ventura School neared completion Monday, officials at the juvenile prison said 15 employees have been fired or forced to resign for having improper relations with inmates. Five of the workers were forced out after California Youth Authority officials concluded they had sex with inmates, Supt. Greg Lowe said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They already suspected it was a bad idea. And after being frisked by guards, eyeballed by inmates and hustled into a cellblock at the juvenile prison to be yelled at by a hard-eyed convicted killer, these Oxnard teen-agers were absolutely sure of it. Joining gangs is a really bad idea. A recent three-hour tour of the California Youth Authority's Ventura School in Camarillo convinced 13 Oxnard High School freshmen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Probation Department will open the largest juvenile detention facility in the county next week, a 660-bed complex in Lancaster that is expected to relieve crowding at the department's three juvenile halls. Opening ceremonies for the 42-acre, $35-million Challenger Memorial Youth Center are scheduled for Tuesday. The facility, named for the destroyed Challenger space shuttle, includes six individual camps named after each of the astronauts who died in the 1986 crash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999
The director of the state prison system Wednesday suspended the top three administrators at scandal-plagued Ventura School after investigators found a two-decades-long pattern of mismanagement and sexual misconduct at the juvenile prison near Camarillo. Robert B. Presley, secretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, placed the administrators on paid leave pending a review of a scathing report released Wednesday by the state inspector general's office. School Supt.
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | From Associated Press
Good behavior is no longer enough to get a parole recommendation from the California Youth Authority. CYA wards are now required to earn their high school diploma or the educational equivalent before being paroled. "It could [cost more] in the short term to keep someone a few months longer, but our long-range plan is, if they don't come back to us, it will save $34,000 a year," said CYA spokeswoman Sarah Ludeman.
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