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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1989
After reading the article, I found it very comforting to know that there is no age restrictions for owning air rifles. The victim was indeed lucky that his eyes were not knocked out and a BB did not strike him in (one of) his temples. I am outraged that another human being was subjected to such terror. I bet those kids will just get a slap on the hand. After all, these are juveniles and, in our system of laws, are not held responsible for their actions. This spineless law must be changed.
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OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Alex Hribal, the 16-year-old suspect in a stabbing spree at a Pennsylvania high school, has been charged as an adult by local prosecutors. That's not unusual. According to the National Juvenile Justice Network, an estimated 200,000 minors are tried, sentenced or incarcerated as adults in the United States every year. Those numbers reflect a trend dating back to the 1990s, when states started making it easier to divert adolescents accused of some crimes from the juvenile justice system - where the overriding objective is rehabilitation - to the adult criminal justice system, which emphasizes retribution and deterrence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994
In his March 11 column "A Legislative Con Job on Juvenile Crime," Ron Harris fails to understand why legislators are introducing bills to lengthen the jail time served by violent juveniles. Instead, he simply indicts all legislators who introduce such legislation as poll watchers who subordinate policy to politics. Harris takes issue with my bill, AB 136, which gives judges the discretion to try 14- and 15-year-olds accused of murder as adults. The bill doesn't mandate adult trial for juveniles, it simply says judges can determine whether or not an accused murderer should serve seven years as a juvenile or 16 years as an adult--on a case by case basis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County supervisors are considering an overhaul of the county's system for defending juveniles accused of crimes. Under-age criminal defendants who can't afford a lawyer are generally represented by someone from the county public defender's office. But when that office is already representing another defendant in the case or a special circumstance arises, lawyers from a separate panel step in to remove the potential conflict of interest. Advocates argue that the switch creates another problem: The private lawyers the county contracts with for these cases, known as panel attorneys, are paid less - a flat rate of $319 to $345 per case - and may not represent their clients as vigorously.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Kansas Supreme Court ruled that juveniles have a constitutional right to a jury trial, a surprise decision that could influence courts in other states and force local prosecutors to retry hundreds of open cases. In a 6-1 decision, the court based its ruling partly on a provision of the Kansas Constitution that states defendants "in all prosecutions" are guaranteed a speedy jury trial. Courts generally have said for several decades that states aren't required to have jury trials for juveniles as they are for adult defendants.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz
About 3 out of every 25 youths in state and privately run juvenile correctional facilities have experienced at least one incident of sexual victimization, according to a federal study released Thursday. The study, which is the first of its kind, brings attention to the need for more training and accountability for staff members at such facilities, said Linda McFarlane, deputy executive director of Just Detention International, a nonprofit human rights organization that works on preventing abuse in detention centers.
OPINION
February 18, 2004
The deaths of two children found hanging in their cells at the Preston Youth Correctional Facility in January provide another reason for public outrage at a juvenile justice system that is designed only to punish young offenders without also rehabilitating them. Worst of all is the current trend toward trying children in adult courts and housing them in adult facilities, where they are eight times more likely to attempt suicide. At Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles, nine children still remain locked in their cells for up to 23 1/2 hours at a stretch, despite a unanimous decision by the Board of Supervisors to relocate the children and even though a parallel California Youth Authority facility has been constructed and staffed to accommodate the Men's Central juveniles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1991 | MATT LAIT
Civil rights attorneys are seeking to overturn two court orders that they contend violate the privacy rights of thousands of Orange County juveniles by allowing schools and law enforcement officials to share confidential records. In a lawsuit filed Tuesday in the 4th District Court of Appeal, the American Civil Liberties Union claims that Orange County Superior Court Judge C. Robert Jameson went beyond his authority when he signed the two orders in March and December of 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1990
Two juveniles were being held on suspicion of murder Saturday after police discovered the registered owner of a car they were driving stabbed to death at her Eagle Rock home. Los Angeles Police Detective Ron Whitt said that police apprehended the two suspected gang members, ages 14 and 15, after they ran a stop sign in a Nissan 280Z about 1:30 a.m. Saturday. The car's registration indicated that it belonged to Doniece Taylor, 48, Whitt said.
NEWS
February 20, 1990
Camp O'Neal, located next to Convict Lake where the apparent drownings occurred, is a year-round institution for high school-aged juvenile delinquents, most of them spending six to 18 months there, officials said. Most of the youths at the privately owned camp were referred there by juvenile authorities in the San Joaquin Valley, said one local official. None of the estimated 50 boys now living there come from Mono County or Southern California.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court struck down a judge's power to choose to give a life sentence without parole to juveniles. The unanimous ruling by the state's highest court came after the U.S. Supreme Court in June struck down mandatory life sentences for minors. The state's top court went further in its Tuesday ruling, saying that even discretionary sentences should be banned. “Given the unique characteristics of juvenile offenders, they should be afforded, in appropriate circumstances, the opportunity to be considered for parole suitability,” the court wrote in its decision.
OPINION
December 5, 2013
Re "L.A. County speeds up plan to rebuild youth probation camp," Nov. 26 Los Angeles County's probation camp system, based on an 80-year-old correctional design, represents an outdated approach to juvenile justice. The camps' institutional design, with barracks-style dormitories and open bathrooms, has failed to meet the complex needs of incarcerated youth and remains an impediment to reform. Through the Camp Kilpatrick replacement project, the county has the opportunity to further leave behind decades of abuse and poor outcomes and create a rehabilitative camp focused on treatment and improving the lives of young people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County officials took steps Tuesday to speed up a $48-million plan to rebuild and modernize one of the county's probation camps for young offenders. Camp Kilpatrick, an aging 125-bed facility for juvenile offenders in Malibu, is slated to be torn down and reconstructed under a new design that probation officials said would allow them to implement a new "small group treatment" model. "I think when it's finished, Los Angeles will have a state-of-the-art facility, and people will be coming from across the nation to see how to do it right," said probation department Assistant Chief Don Meyer, who oversees the county's 13 probation camps and three juvenile halls.
NATIONAL
November 5, 2013 | By David Horsey, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Imagine yourself taking a job where, for the first year or two, you have to put up with verbal taunts and physical intimidation from your more senior co-workers; where you are expected to serve their every whim, submit to involuntary head shaving and pick up the tab for thousands of dollars worth of meals that those more senior workers consume. You probably would say, “Take this job and shove it.” That is pretty much what second-year tackle Jonathan Martin told the Miami Dolphins this week when he left the team and returned home to Los Angeles.
SPORTS
November 2, 2013 | By John Cherwa
The Juvenile is the race that should foreshadow the Kentucky Derby favorite. The favorite, yes, the winner, almost never. Of the 29 previous Breeders' Cup Juvenile winners, only one -- Street Sense in 2006 -- has achieved that double. But that doesn't keep people from dreaming, and currently that optimism belongs to New Year's Day and trainer Bob Baffert. The horse saved ground throughout the race, coming off the rail only twice and was fourth at the start of the stretch and came charging late to win the 1 1/16-mile race by 1 1/4-lengths.
SPORTS
November 2, 2013 | By John Cherwa
Common sense would dictate that the horse who wins the biggest 2-year-old race of the year would then be destined for greatness six months later in the Kentucky Derby. But when did common sense and racing ever go together? Instead, it has been more of a curse. In the previous 29 years, only one horse has won the Breeders' Cup Juvenile and the Kentucky Derby - Street Sense in 2006 and 2007. New Year's Day is hoping to change that history on the first Saturday in May. The lightly raced 2-year-old was guided by jockey Martin Garcia to seventh at the three-quarter-mile pole, fourth at the top of the stretch and won going away by 11/4 lengths.
SPORTS
November 2, 2013 | By Bill Dwyre
Saturday's Breeders' Cup started with a thud. Death and pain followed quickly. Thoroughbred horse racing is a thing of beauty. Also, occasionally, a sport of the ugly and nasty. In the first Breeders' Cup race of the final day of this $25 million event, a Bob Baffert -trained horse named Secret Compass, competing in the $2-million Juvenile Fillies, went down hard in the home turn. She was competing near the front of the pack, digging hard. Then came the fractured leg, horrifying in its suddenness.
SPORTS
November 2, 2013 | By John Cherwa
The first Breeders' Cup race of the day was filled with controversy and heartbreak. She's a Tiger beat Ria Antonia by a nose to seemingly win the $2-million Juvenile Fillies race Saturday at Santa Anita. But the stewards flashed the inquiry sign having seen She's a Tiger, with Gary Stevens aboard, lug out in deep stretch and make contact with Ria Antonia. About 10 minutes later the results were reversed with She's a Tiger was dropped to second. The move was met with much displeasure with the crowd as a 5-1 horse was supplanted an entry that 32-1 horse, meaning much fewer winning tickets.
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