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OPINION
January 14, 2010
The United States is the only nation in which someone can be locked up forever, with no chance for parole, for a crime committed in his or her youth. The Supreme Court is expected in coming days or weeks to rule on whether states may continue this costly, foolish and cruel practice of extinguishing a youth's hope and chances at redemption, even in cases in which no one died. California has 250 people in this position -- condemned to stay in prison until they die for crimes they committed at ages as young as 14; only Pennsylvania and Florida have more.
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OPINION
January 14, 2010
The United States is the only nation in which someone can be locked up forever, with no chance for parole, for a crime committed in his or her youth. The Supreme Court is expected in coming days or weeks to rule on whether states may continue this costly, foolish and cruel practice of extinguishing a youth's hope and chances at redemption, even in cases in which no one died. California has 250 people in this position -- condemned to stay in prison until they die for crimes they committed at ages as young as 14; only Pennsylvania and Florida have more.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As it struggles to recover from bankruptcy, the county government will need more money and more employees to handle the increasing needs for law enforcement, health and social services, according to detailed reports released Monday. The sobering conclusion comes from business plans that each of the county's departments and agencies has been developing over the last year.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted of a brutal murder, Lionel Tate seemed precisely the child that get-tough sentencing laws were designed to punish. Although he was just 12 years old when he beat a young playmate to death, Tate received life in prison without parole. But barely a week after the boy, now 14, was led in shackles from a courtroom, he has become a symbol for child advocates, state lawmakers and even prosecutors who say the laws are too tough and too inflexible.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted of a brutal murder, Lionel Tate seemed precisely the child that get-tough sentencing laws were designed to punish. Although he was just 12 years old when he beat a young playmate to death, Tate received life in prison without parole. But barely a week after the boy, now 14, was led in shackles from a courtroom, he has become a symbol for child advocates, state lawmakers and even prosecutors who say the laws are too tough and too inflexible.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Assume you're trying to land a job during a time when the economic pendulum is barely beginning to swing up. Assume further that you have little or no experience at any job of any kind. And, by the way, you have a recent criminal record. As far as much of the world of employment is concerned, you're persona non grata.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1999
The Clinton administration's threat to bring a class-action lawsuit against gun makers might be largely bluster. But even if it is, Tuesday's announcement, along with suits already filed by 29 cities and counties, reflects the real frustration of public officials and ordinary Americans over gun violence--the unending school shootings, workplace massacres and domestic quarrels that turn lethal.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1999 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiators for firearms makers and major U.S. cities met privately Monday in Washington to discuss the potential for settling the wave of municipal lawsuits that have engulfed the handgun industry. Participants, including Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn, declined to give details but said further meetings are planned, suggesting possible areas of common ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1995 | SCOTT HARRIS
J. C. Willis of Sun Valley writes: . . . I agree with Mr. Masters on this point: If I'm in danger, it will be me who decides if I live or die, not some punk with a gun who may shoot you (or stab you with a screwdriver) if you don't have enough money in your wallet. You can do what you want to do in that situation.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | MYRON LEVIN and ALISSA RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The federal government is throwing its weight behind the legal assault on gun manufacturers, intensifying pressure on them to adopt sweeping changes in their business practices by settling lawsuits already filed against the industry by 29 cities and counties. Clinton administration officials said Tuesday that they will join settlement negotiations aimed at limiting the flow of handguns to kids and criminals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As it struggles to recover from bankruptcy, the county government will need more money and more employees to handle the increasing needs for law enforcement, health and social services, according to detailed reports released Monday. The sobering conclusion comes from business plans that each of the county's departments and agencies has been developing over the last year.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Assume you're trying to land a job during a time when the economic pendulum is barely beginning to swing up. Assume further that you have little or no experience at any job of any kind. And, by the way, you have a recent criminal record. As far as much of the world of employment is concerned, you're persona non grata.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | BRIGITTE GREENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Department of Housing and Urban Development and the mayors of Atlanta, Detroit and Miami on Saturday directed their law enforcement agencies to give preference to Smith & Wesson when buying guns and called on municipal leaders nationwide to follow suit.
OPINION
May 16, 1999 | Sandra Hernandez, Sandra Hernandez, a former staff writer for LA Weekly, has written extensively about immigration and Latino issues
Early this year, Thomas J. Schiltgen became director of the Los Angeles district office of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. A 24-year veteran of the agency, Schiltgen takes over running the largest INS office in the nation at a critical time.
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