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K D Lang

ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN
k.d. lang "Ingenue" Warner Bros . * * * Lang used to claim she was channeling the spirit and voice of Patsy Cline. Now, perhaps, Edith Piaf has pirated the frequency. Lang's last album--and perhaps her last as a "country" artist--was winkingly called "Absolute Torch and Twang," but this very different follow-up is all torch 'n' hardly a hint of twang.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1997 | RICHARD CROMELIN
K.d. lang executed two gender reversals in her lyrics during her Wiltern Theatre concert on Wednesday. In Steve Miller's "The Joker," she got rid of the cowboy and made it, "Some people call me the space cowgirl." And during her own "Miss Chatelaine," she glanced down at her '50s-style suit and two-tone oxfords and crooned, "I can't explain why I've become Mister Chatelaine."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Grammy-winning singer k.d. lang knows her androgynous appearance doesn't fit the usual mold of country music stars. In an interview for cable television, Lang says her appearance and manner "became unprecedented for a woman in country to look and act." "Their role is specifically set out," she said. "Unfortunately, everyone in country music today pretty much abides by those rules. And if they don't, they don't get played on the radio and they don't get (Country Music Assn.) nominations."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
k.d. lang has come up with more than just the title of the year for this collection of songs built around the theme of cigarettes. She has also given us what is likely to stand as one of 1997's most ambitious and satisfying albums. Despite the fun of her early cowgirl years on record, lang found her artistic calling in 1990 when she recorded Cole Porter's "So in Love"--demonstrating a vocal freedom and liberation on the pop standard that was little short of astonishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would be easy to pigeonhole k.d. lang as the queen of gorgeous downer pop, and indeed she does reign supreme when singing of unrequited longing. The songs on her latest album, "Invincible Summer," however, are atypically upbeat and delightful--as in filled with delight at the joy of love's first blush. But lang followers know that "Invincible Summer" isn't really a stylistic turnaround.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2000 | ROBERT HILBURN
Like most quality artists, lang is most compelling when she's edging toward emotional extremes--either challenging pop sensibilities as she did with her early cowgirl-punk approach or by revisiting familiar pop terrain (such as Roy Orbison's "Crying" or Cole Porter's "So in Love") with an intensity that is flat-out haunting. On "Invincible Summer" (which will arrive in stores on June 20), lang stays closer to the mainstream with music that lulls and caresses rather than shakes or rattles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer k.d. lang, she of the uniquely lowercase name and brilliantly uppercase voice, is a consummate entertainer solidly grounded in the great show-biz traditions, and certainly no shock therapist. For all the controversy that's occasionally cropped up over her recently revealed homosexuality, her vegetarianism, her musical shifts, etc., she ultimately quests merely to win you and woo you with song, like many a less provocative balladeer over the decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1995 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The 1995 edition of k.d. lang is markedly different from that of a few years ago. Interviewed in 1992 for the release of her last album, "Ingenue," the singer seemed guarded and withdrawn--and understandably so.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Crimes in Time" / 6 and 10 p.m. History Channel Producers of this two-hour special have selected four crimes that ostensibly "tell the story of an era." Well, you can be the judge of that while watching an account of the man who in 1911 stole the Mona Lisa--not for money, but for revenge.
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