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November 26, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
When country singer K. T. Oslin isn't touring, she finds life in the Music City a restful alternative, if a little slow. And Oslin, 48, who spent more than 20 years in New York City, says the biggest cities can seem quite small where love is concerned. "New York City has 8 million people, and women there say, 'There's no men here, I can't meet anybody.' "In a town of 1,800 they say, 'There's no men here.'
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September 21, 1991 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Post-modern, Pacific Rim country music. That's the description that came to mind Thursday night at El Cajon's Theatre East (East County Performing Arts Center) when the curtain rose to reveal country singer K.T. Oslin in a very un-rustic setting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If things work out as K.T. Oslin would like, the country-pop singer may be growing a new set of initials: T.V. Oslin. "Television is approaching us all the time about sitcoms and this and that," Oslin, who sings tonight at the Celebrity Theatre, said in a recent phone interview from her home in Nashville. "So far we haven't hit on what we think is right. But you know it when you see what's right. "I would like to incorporate acting back into my life, because that's what I started as."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1991 | RICHARD CROMELIN
It's no longer a novelty to see an independent, forceful woman in country music, but K.T. Oslin is still an anomaly. She was in her early 40s when her career clicked into gear five years ago, so she's a kind of mature novice. And though her three albums have been country hits, the singer-songwriter has staked out a defiantly distinctive turf, an area of sophisticated song-craft whose links to country music are often tangential at best.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1991 | RICHARD CROMELIN
It's no longer a novelty to see an independent, forceful woman in country music, but K.T. Oslin is still an anomaly. She was in her early 40s when her career clicked into gear five years ago, so she's a kind of mature novice. And though her three albums have been country hits, the singer-songwriter has staked out a defiantly distinctive turf, an area of sophisticated song-craft whose links to country music are often tangential at best.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1991 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Post-modern, Pacific Rim country music. That's the description that came to mind Thursday night at El Cajon's Theatre East (East County Performing Arts Center) when the curtain rose to reveal country singer K.T. Oslin in a very un-rustic setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT
There are not only good country songs on K.T. Oslin's albums. But there's also a good song in her life story. "The Ballad of the Late Bloomer" would be a natural title--an upbeat tune about a middle-aged New York woman who managed to break into country music and become a star. You could play up the pathos--the fact people thought she was too old and that her RCA album last year was her last chance to make good. Some tear-jerking, pedal-steel guitar lines would heighten the drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
K.T. Oslin, with five nominations, leads the pack of contenders for the 24th annual Academy of Country Music Awards announced Tuesday at Disneyland. Oslin, a former actress, emerged last year at age 45 as the academy's best new female vocalist and best video artist. Far from suffering a sophomore slump, her work during 1988 won her nominations for top female vocalist, single of the year, album of the year, and two nominations for video of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | JOE EDWARDS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The graffiti was printed neatly in black ink on a bathroom stall in a cafe in Due West, S.C. "I ain't never gonna love nobody but Cornell Crawford," it declared. When K. T. Oslin read it, she chuckled. Then, pondering its directness and determination, she knew she had a song. The result is "Cornell Crawford," one of Oslin's songs in her third country music album, "Love in a Small Town."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1990 | RANDY LEWIS
Oslin may have made a late start, releasing her debut album three years ago at age 45, but she's more than made up for lost time, releasing three albums of sharply observed, honestly felt and effortlessly performed country songs. Oslin possesses the writer's crucial eye for detail--not just for its own sake, but for creating characters instead of caricatures. Her "Mary and Willi" are, in her words, "modern lovers who never met" because they foolishly cling to ideals of romantic perfection.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If things work out as K.T. Oslin would like, the country-pop singer may be growing a new set of initials: T.V. Oslin. "Television is approaching us all the time about sitcoms and this and that," Oslin, who sings tonight at the Celebrity Theatre, said in a recent phone interview from her home in Nashville. "So far we haven't hit on what we think is right. But you know it when you see what's right. "I would like to incorporate acting back into my life, because that's what I started as."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
When country singer K. T. Oslin isn't touring, she finds life in the Music City a restful alternative, if a little slow. And Oslin, 48, who spent more than 20 years in New York City, says the biggest cities can seem quite small where love is concerned. "New York City has 8 million people, and women there say, 'There's no men here, I can't meet anybody.' "In a town of 1,800 they say, 'There's no men here.'
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | JOE EDWARDS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The graffiti was printed neatly in black ink on a bathroom stall in a cafe in Due West, S.C. "I ain't never gonna love nobody but Cornell Crawford," it declared. When K. T. Oslin read it, she chuckled. Then, pondering its directness and determination, she knew she had a song. The result is "Cornell Crawford," one of Oslin's songs in her third country music album, "Love in a Small Town."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1990 | RANDY LEWIS
Oslin may have made a late start, releasing her debut album three years ago at age 45, but she's more than made up for lost time, releasing three albums of sharply observed, honestly felt and effortlessly performed country songs. Oslin possesses the writer's crucial eye for detail--not just for its own sake, but for creating characters instead of caricatures. Her "Mary and Willi" are, in her words, "modern lovers who never met" because they foolishly cling to ideals of romantic perfection.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
K.T. Oslin, with five nominations, leads the pack of contenders for the 24th annual Academy of Country Music Awards announced Tuesday at Disneyland. Oslin, a former actress, emerged last year at age 45 as the academy's best new female vocalist and best video artist. Far from suffering a sophomore slump, her work during 1988 won her nominations for top female vocalist, single of the year, album of the year, and two nominations for video of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT
There are not only good country songs on K.T. Oslin's albums. But there's also a good song in her life story. "The Ballad of the Late Bloomer" would be a natural title--an upbeat tune about a middle-aged New York woman who managed to break into country music and become a star. You could play up the pathos--the fact people thought she was too old and that her RCA album last year was her last chance to make good. Some tear-jerking, pedal-steel guitar lines would heighten the drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Roy Rogers Triggers New Album: Roy Rogers, "the king of the cowboys," is back in the saddle again. Rogers is teaming up with some country music stars in Nashville, Tenn., to record an album of songs with a Western flavor. The 78-year-old Rogers already has recorded "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" with country star K. T. Oslin. Other singers lined up include Waylon Jennings, Emmylou Harris, Ricky Van Shelton and Restless Heart. The album is expected to be released in 1991.
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