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Kabul Government

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NEWS
January 20, 1991 | SHARON HERBAUGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the distant, snowy Hindu Kush of Afghanistan, the mountain stillness is broken by the rockets, bombs and bullets of a leftover war against a faded ideology. "We will fight until communism is gone from our country," said Gulzaman Tahidyar, a 21-year-old guerrilla. "We will bring Islam to Afghanistan." "We will live in the desert, we will live in the mountains, but we will never accept communism," said Tahidyar, the anti-communist slogans of the early 1980s tumbling out.
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OPINION
September 6, 2009 | DOYLE McMANUS
Has Afghanistan turned into Barack Obama's Vietnam? It could, but it hasn't yet. At this point, there are still crucial differences between the two wars, including: Support at home. The American public's support for the war has certainly declined, but eight years after 9/11, enthusiasm for its original goal of destroying Al Qaeda remains strong. A smaller, more targeted fighting force. More than 500,000 U.S. troops were in Vietnam in 1969; more than 58,000 died in the course of the war. U.S. troop strength in Afghanistan will reach 68,000 later this year; as of last week, 562 had been killed in action -- about one-hundredth the toll of the Vietnam War. Honest military assessments.
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NEWS
February 2, 1987
A car bomb exploded outside the Indian Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, killing four people and injuring at least 17, news reports said. Kabul radio blamed the blast on "the enemies of the country," referring to Muslim rebels fighting the Soviet-backed Kabul government. The Press Trust of India news agency said 15 embassy employees and two Indian airline workers were slightly injured in the blast. Rebel leaders have accused India of giving military support to the Afghan government.
WORLD
August 14, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first visit by an Iranian head of state to neighboring Afghanistan in 40 years, President Mohammad Khatami threw his support Tuesday behind the U.S.-backed government here but strongly criticized the American approach to the global war on terrorism. Apparently referring to the ongoing hunt by U.S.
NEWS
January 24, 1987 | From Reuters
Afghanistan's ruling People's Democratic Party will relinquish power if it is rejected in national elections, the Afghan ambassador to India, Abdul Samad Azhar, said Friday. He declined to say how soon elections would be held. Speaking at a news conference at the Afghan Embassy here, Azhar said the recent call by the Kabul government for national reconciliation was "so that all those who are interested and have a platform can help to build the new Afghanistan."
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | From Reuters
A Soviet official conceded on Thursday that Moscow had made a mistake in believing the Kabul government could gain control of Afghanistan. Yevgeny M. Primakov said the Kremlin, whose forces have backed the Kabul regime since 1979, now wants a coalition Afghan government composed of all factions including the ruling People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush, amid praise for Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's efforts to aid the Afghan resistance, pledged today to join her in exploring "any serious avenue" to a political solution to the bloody conflict in Afghanistan. "Prime Minister Bhutto and I reviewed the situation in Afghanistan. . . . We agreed . . . that the job is not done," Bush said of the Afghan rebels' struggle to topple the Marxist regime in Kabul. The two leaders met for an hour with the Afghan situation the centerpiece of their discussions.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, after meeting in private for nearly an hour with Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, pledged Tuesday that the United States will "explore any serious avenue" to a political solution to the bloody military stalemate in war-torn Afghanistan. In a separate statement during an official White House ceremony after their meeting, Bhutto stressed that her nation also "remains committed to a political solution of the Afghan problem," principally because "Pakistan's commitment to peace and democracy are fundamental."
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Premier Mohammed Hassan Sharq resigned Monday, broadening the power of President Najibullah. Sharq, 63, had remained in Najibullah's 28-member Cabinet after a weekend shake-up in which the president replaced seven of 10 non-Communist Party ministers with members of his Marxist People's Democratic Party. Sharq is not a member of the ruling party but had been selected as premier by Najibullah last May to help portray his government as enjoying broader support.
WORLD
August 14, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first visit by an Iranian head of state to neighboring Afghanistan in 40 years, President Mohammad Khatami threw his support Tuesday behind the U.S.-backed government here but strongly criticized the American approach to the global war on terrorism. Apparently referring to the ongoing hunt by U.S.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | DAVID ZUCCHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kabul is built of dirt. Squat little homes of mud and clay have been carved from the bare brown hills that ring the city, and vast adobe slums have risen from the earth itself. The building blocks of the capital are pale tan bricks of dirt and clay. They are cut from the ground and fired in hundreds of earthen kilns that look like huge, prehistoric anthills belching pungent black smoke. War and reconstruction have been good to the men who earn their living in the brutish work of brick-making.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | SHARON HERBAUGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the distant, snowy Hindu Kush of Afghanistan, the mountain stillness is broken by the rockets, bombs and bullets of a leftover war against a faded ideology. "We will fight until communism is gone from our country," said Gulzaman Tahidyar, a 21-year-old guerrilla. "We will bring Islam to Afghanistan." "We will live in the desert, we will live in the mountains, but we will never accept communism," said Tahidyar, the anti-communist slogans of the early 1980s tumbling out.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, after meeting in private for nearly an hour with Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, pledged Tuesday that the United States will "explore any serious avenue" to a political solution to the bloody military stalemate in war-torn Afghanistan. In a separate statement during an official White House ceremony after their meeting, Bhutto stressed that her nation also "remains committed to a political solution of the Afghan problem," principally because "Pakistan's commitment to peace and democracy are fundamental."
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush, amid praise for Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's efforts to aid the Afghan resistance, pledged today to join her in exploring "any serious avenue" to a political solution to the bloody conflict in Afghanistan. "Prime Minister Bhutto and I reviewed the situation in Afghanistan. . . . We agreed . . . that the job is not done," Bush said of the Afghan rebels' struggle to topple the Marxist regime in Kabul. The two leaders met for an hour with the Afghan situation the centerpiece of their discussions.
NEWS
April 3, 1989
Afghan Foreign Minister Abdul Wakil appealed to the United States to change its attitude toward the Kabul government. "We are never going to construct socialism or communism in this land," Wakil said in an interview in Kabul with the Reuters news agency. "This is not bluff or propaganda; it took a lot of effort and time and energy and work for us to deviate from the extremist policies we used to pursue."
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Premier Mohammed Hassan Sharq resigned Monday, broadening the power of President Najibullah. Sharq, 63, had remained in Najibullah's 28-member Cabinet after a weekend shake-up in which the president replaced seven of 10 non-Communist Party ministers with members of his Marxist People's Democratic Party. Sharq is not a member of the ruling party but had been selected as premier by Najibullah last May to help portray his government as enjoying broader support.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | From Reuters
A Soviet official conceded on Thursday that Moscow had made a mistake in believing the Kabul government could gain control of Afghanistan. Yevgeny M. Primakov said the Kremlin, whose forces have backed the Kabul regime since 1979, now wants a coalition Afghan government composed of all factions including the ruling People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan.
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