Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKabun Muto
IN THE NEWS

Kabun Muto

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kabun Muto, Japan's former international trade minister who has opposed scrapping the ban on rice imports and once said U.S. auto employees work just three good days a week, was named foreign minister Tuesday. Muto, 66, succeeds Michio Watanabe, who resigned Tuesday after fighting illness for the past several months.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kabun Muto, Japan's former international trade minister who has opposed scrapping the ban on rice imports and once said U.S. auto employees work just three good days a week, was named foreign minister Tuesday. Muto, 66, succeeds Michio Watanabe, who resigned Tuesday after fighting illness for the past several months.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Japan is ready to comply with U.S. demands to ease enforcement of a law regulating the establishment of large retail stores, the minister of international trade and industry said today. U.S. trade negotiators listed Japan's large retail store law as one of several barriers to American imports to Japan. "At the moment I think it will be sufficient to ease the law, but in three years we may have to make a drastic change," said Trade Minister Kabun Muto.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | Reuters
Russia on Friday criticized remarks by Japan's new foreign minister that he will continue to press for the return of four small islands off northern Japan that Soviet troops seized after World War II. Foreign Ministry spokesman Sergei Yastrzhembsky said the comments by Kabun Muto set an ominous tone ahead of Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev's visit to Tokyo next week.
NEWS
June 23, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Kabun Muto came up with a new idea to help the beleaguered Liberal Democratic Party retain its 38-year grasp on government in Japan--but it wasn't a very diplomatic one.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1990 | From Reuters
The European Community and Japan met today at a high level for the first time in 3 1/2 years to try to clear the air between the two trading giants, EC officials and diplomats said. The community is running a huge and persistent trade deficit with Japan, its second-biggest supplier after the United States. "The deficit of the community can only be reduced significantly if EC exports to Japan grow 2 1/2 times as fast as Japanese exports to the EC," an EC official said.
NEWS
April 16, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's offer to visit Japan next month ran into a wall Thursday. Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev, whom Yeltsin said he had instructed to firm up dates for the trip during his visit to Tokyo, spent nearly five hours meeting and dining with Japanese Foreign Minister Kabun Muto but came up empty-handed. Kozyrev had no other meetings scheduled before his departure today.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Kabun Muto said Wednesday that Japan must have the will to build nuclear weapons if necessary to defend itself against a North Korean nuclear threat, the Nihon Keizai newspaper reported. Muto made the statement only to Japanese reporters at a news conference in Singapore after assuring the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations that Japan would offer unqualified support for an indefinite extension of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
In a case seen as a test of alleged unfair barriers to entering the Japanese market, the government has agreed to consider a U.S. toy company's move to open a store in the country, officials said today. Toys R Us Inc. has announced plans to open a 53,800-square-foot discount store in Niigata, 160 miles northwest of Tokyo. Local shopkeepers were strongly opposing the move, news reports said.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration was optimistic Wednesday over signs that the Japanese government may be moving decisively to ease growing U.S.-Japanese trade frictions, but officials here declined to speculate about what concessions, if any, Tokyo might offer. Washington's heightened hopes followed reports from Tokyo early Wednesday that Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu had summoned his finance, trade and foreign ministers for emergency consultations on how to respond to U.S. demands.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two days before he leaves for an urgent summit meeting with President Bush, Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu asserted himself today by naming a new Cabinet free of scandal-tainted ministers but also dumped the two women in his old Cabinet, reverting to an all-male lineup. Two key ministers, Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama and Finance Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, were retained despite efforts by strongmen of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party to have them replaced.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|