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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2003 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
One sleepless night, in the near future, adolescent Joan (Laila Kearney) informs her aunt that something untoward has occurred outside. "Now what did you imagine you saw in the dark?" Aunt Harper (Beth Hogan) clucks. Her chipper facade conceals panic; she knows her niece witnessed an unspeakable waking nightmare. She dissembles: "It is like a person screaming when you hear an owl." Thus begins the hourlong descent into grotesque chaos that is "Far Away."
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NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Ted Rall
From a cartoonist's standpoint, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is the gift that keeps on giving. With allegations that include corruption and inmate abuse, you have to wonder whether the really bad guys aren't the ones inside the cells but the ones guarding them. Responding to numerous credible reports of dirty dealings by deputies, the FBI arrested a number of sheriff's officials in connection with a wide-ranging probe of alleged improprieties by a department charged with - remember?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1987
At first I thought it might be Kafka I was reading, then it struck me. It was the best definition of Hell I'd read in years: "Who would think to go into a field of employment in which a certain level of training and skill is at the same time mandatory and immaterial?" The light shed in Lawrence Christon's article ("So Many Actors, So Few Roles," Nov. 15) was at once heartbreaking and perfectly true. AL ALU, actor Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Very few writers lend themselves to being covered ... in the pop music sense of the word. The idea seems almost contradictory: How, after all, are we to rework a poem or a story, give it an interpretive spin? And yet, there is always Franz Kafka , whose writing continues to provide not just inspiration but also source material for a wide array of work. This week, I've encountered two such projects: David Zain Mairowitz and Jaromir 99's graphic novel of “The Castle” (SelfMadeHero: 144 pp., $19.95 paper)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1996 | PHILIP BRANDES
Clinging to cliches like continuity of plot and character will only get you in trouble at Eugene Ionesco's "Victims of Duty," especially given Frederique Michel's full-throttle staging for Santa Monica's City Garage. The signature non sequiturs, jarring emotional shifts and irrational behavior in the Romanian-born playwright's 1952 absurdist farce remain perplexing and disturbing to this day.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The King of Kahel Tierno Monénembo, translated from the French Nicholas Elliott Amazon Crossing: 289 pp., $13.95 paper It's "The Little Prince" with a hint of "Curious George" and a smidgen of "Gulliver's Travels. " Based on the real life of 19th century explorer Olivier de Sanderval, this novel travels outward from the dreams of an 8-year-old boy who would be king. When he gets old enough to make his dreams reality, Olivier departs, at age 40 in 1879, from the port of Marseille, France, to colonize his corner of Africa, Fouta Djallon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Miriam Katin's “Letting It Go” (Drawn & Quarterly: 160 pp., $24.95) is my kind of graphic memoir: loose, impressionistic, a portrait of the artist's inner life. Keyed by the decision of her adult son Ilan to take up permanent residence in Berlin, it is, in part, the story of her coming to terms, at long last, with her legacy as a survivor of the Holocaust. But without minimizing this part of the story, “Letting It Go” is much more than that - a meditation on love, on family, and an inquiry into art. Functioning in some sense as a sketchbook, Katin's story is delightfully open-ended, less a look back at a particular situation than a series of reflections from the trenches of her life as it is lived.
OPINION
April 21, 2013
Name your favorite, the one book that most sticks in your mind. Over nearly four years, photographer Catherine Wagner made that request of friends, acquaintances and outright strangers. She kept a tally on her iPhone and turned the top vote-getters into the spine of her latest work, "trans/literate," an homage to books - the cardboard and paper sort that some predict won't survive the 21st century. The list of titles and authors reads like an exceptionally weighty version of English 101. "Most people went back to their teenage years, to high school or college," Wagner said.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is how the justice system used to work in this country: Debtors were routinely locked up. Peasants could spend decades in prison for stealing and eating a cow. Suspects languished eight years behind bars awaiting a verdict, were found innocent, then had to remain in prison while prosecutors appealed--sometimes all the way to the Supreme Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1991 | TONY PERRY
Can I trust you with a secret? I'm hooked on reruns of "The Fugitive," the classic television series (1963-67) starring David Janssen as Dr. Richard Kimble, "unjustly convicted . . . " Weekdays, 7 a.m., Arts & Entertainment channel. My son Michael and I watch while having breakfast. I explain to Michael the symbolic use of light and dark, the moral ambiguity, the analogues to the pessimism of Kafka and Gide. Michael nods. Did I tell you that he's 7 months old?
NATIONAL
October 16, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Even as a deal was in the works to end the federal government shutdown, bickering continued Wednesday morning -- over the closing of national parks. House Republicans accused the National Park Service of barricading open-air monuments such as the World War II memorial in Washington to make the shutdown "as painful and visible as possible. " But Democrats ridiculed the hearing, coming as congressional leaders scrambled to avert a potentially economically calamitous default on the national debt and end the 16-day government shutdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Alexander Nazaryan
If Wednesday's Google Doodle looks a little buggy, if you will, that's because it's meant to celebrate Franz Kafka, the “Metamorphosis” author who would have turned 130 today. Born on July 3, 1883, in Prague, Kafka spent much of his life as a law clerk in that city. He died in 1924 a virtual unknown -- he even told his friend Max Brod to destroy his unpublished novels, which included “The Trial” and “The Castle.” Luckily, Brod failed to comply with his requests. The Google Doodle alludes to the famous opening of “ The Metamorphosis ,” which reads: “One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin.” With his ineffable sense of the tragic and absurd, Kafka would have likely been skeptical of the Internet, a tool meant to foster human proximity that has most of us spending days in front of a screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Israeli author Amos Oz has been named the recipient of the prestigious Franz Kafka Prize, selected by an international jury from a short list of 12 globally recognized writers. The $10,000 prize, awarded by the Franz Kafka Society in the Czech Republic, recognizes an author's entire body of work, and rewards those whose "work addresses readers regardless of their origin, nationality, and culture, like the work by Franz Kafka. " Their books must also have been translated into Czech.
OPINION
April 21, 2013
Name your favorite, the one book that most sticks in your mind. Over nearly four years, photographer Catherine Wagner made that request of friends, acquaintances and outright strangers. She kept a tally on her iPhone and turned the top vote-getters into the spine of her latest work, "trans/literate," an homage to books - the cardboard and paper sort that some predict won't survive the 21st century. The list of titles and authors reads like an exceptionally weighty version of English 101. "Most people went back to their teenage years, to high school or college," Wagner said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Miriam Katin's “Letting It Go” (Drawn & Quarterly: 160 pp., $24.95) is my kind of graphic memoir: loose, impressionistic, a portrait of the artist's inner life. Keyed by the decision of her adult son Ilan to take up permanent residence in Berlin, it is, in part, the story of her coming to terms, at long last, with her legacy as a survivor of the Holocaust. But without minimizing this part of the story, “Letting It Go” is much more than that - a meditation on love, on family, and an inquiry into art. Functioning in some sense as a sketchbook, Katin's story is delightfully open-ended, less a look back at a particular situation than a series of reflections from the trenches of her life as it is lived.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Franz Kafka hardly conjures a light, romantic image. But a summer tour of Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic highlights the love affair between the author and the little-known Dora Diamant. The story unfolds in the streets of Prague,  Czech Republic, where the German author was born, moves to the Jewish Quarter of Krakow, Poland, where Diamant organized plays and ends in Berlin, where the couple lived the Bohemian life in the early 1920s. Kathi Diamant (no relation), who wrote the book "Kafka's Last Love" and heads the Kafka Project at San Diego State University, leads the Magical Mystery Literary History Tour that includes meeting with Kafka scholars and descendants of Dora Diamont too. Proceeds from the trip support the nonprofit Kafka Project, which seeks to recover lost letters, journals and notebooks by the author.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1987
Newsday reports that the royalties department of Random House recently sent a letter to a London publisher that said, in part: "Dear Author: Our records indicate we are missing your Social Security number or taxpayer identification number. In order to avoid penalties imposed by the IRS. . . ." The letter was addressed to Franz Kafka. Random House called it "a computer mistake."
BOOKS
December 22, 1991
Lest readers fall prey to either the "Intentional Fallacy" and assign authorial intent where there was none, or to mere confusion arising from The Times staff's misleading headline, "He Dreamed He Was a Cockroach," which appeared above D. M. Thomas' review of Frederick Karl's "Franz Kafka: Representative Man" (Nov. 17), it is only fair to set the record straight. It was Kafka's short-story character, Gregor Samsa, in "The Metamorphosis" and not Kafka the author who awoke to find himself transformed into a giant insect.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The King of Kahel Tierno Monénembo, translated from the French Nicholas Elliott Amazon Crossing: 289 pp., $13.95 paper It's "The Little Prince" with a hint of "Curious George" and a smidgen of "Gulliver's Travels. " Based on the real life of 19th century explorer Olivier de Sanderval, this novel travels outward from the dreams of an 8-year-old boy who would be king. When he gets old enough to make his dreams reality, Olivier departs, at age 40 in 1879, from the port of Marseille, France, to colonize his corner of Africa, Fouta Djallon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Jim Ruland, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Meeks A novel Julia Holmes Small Beer Press: 190 pp., $16 paper The meek shall inherit the earth, the Bible tells us, but all they get in Julia Holmes' debut novel, "Meeks," is a life of grim servitude. Set in an allegorical city-state that could be any Western nation with a taste for warfare, statuary and civic-minded totalitarianism, "Meeks" is a prayer for the doomed that reads like a comedy. The hero of this land is one Captain Meeks, whose statue presides over the park where the annual Founders Play takes place.
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