Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKaiser International Corp
IN THE NEWS

Kaiser International Corp

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1987
The Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners has unanimously approved a plan to remove the port's largest exporter of coal and petroleum coke from Los Angeles Harbor recreational areas by 1993--one year sooner than expected. The plan to relocate Kaiser International Corp.'s bulk loader to a remote area of Terminal Island will now go to the City Council for approval, which is expected.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000
A coalition of environmental groups has sued the Port of Los Angeles, alleging that harbor officials failed to adequately assess the environmental impacts of redeveloping a controversial coal terminal. The San Pedro-Wilmington Coalition for Environmental Justice and Santa Monica BayKeeper filed the case Thursday in Superior Court to challenge new cargo facilities planned for Berths 48 to 52, the former site of Kaiser International Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1991 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cost of Mayor Tom Bradley's legal defense bills in connection with a series of conflict-of-interest investigations is approaching $1 million, according to a fund-raising report released Friday. During the last half of 1990, Bradley incurred $179,571 in attorney's fees, the report said. The latest figure brings the mayor's total legal tab to more than $930,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1993
The South Coast Air Quality Management District has responsibility to control air pollution. It can seek court-imposed fines against polluters of from $25 to $25,000 a day based on such factors as the extent that emissions exceed legal limits, potential danger to the public, whether the violation was intentional, accidental or due to negligence and the company's history of violations.
NEWS
March 31, 1985 | TIM WATERS, Times Staff Writer
Coal and petroleum coke storage by Kaiser International Corp. at the Port of Los Angeles has been ordered halted by city officials, who said such activities are not permitted under existing zoning. The Los Angeles Harbor Department was served an order last week by the city Department of Building and Safety to curtail the storage of the materials at the 10-acre loading area at Berth 49 and Berth 50.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1985 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
About 200 members of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union picketed Kaiser International Corp. on Monday at the Los Angeles Harbor in San Pedro, protesting firings of up to 75 veteran workers and what they call a bid to establish a non-union beachhead at the harbor. David Arian, president of ILWU Local 13, said the union would move to shut down the harbor if the dispute is not resolved by Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1988 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Last summer, when a ship carrying a cargo of hot coal entered Los Angeles Harbor, officials from the Los Angeles fire and harbor departments agreed to allow one of the port's tenants to unload the $2-million cargo and cool it off. Eventually, the cooled cargo was reloaded on the ship and sent on its way to Taiwan. Fears that the coal was heating up to dangerous temperatures and was about to catch fire were laid to rest. The case of the Fort Providence, a British-owned ship, was closed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1987 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Not long after the cargo ship Fort Providence set sail from New Orleans last month with 54,000 tons of coal destined for a power plant in Taiwan, its captain and crew discovered they had a problem. The British-owned ship's $2-million cargo was heating up to dangerous temperatures. "After passing through the Panama Canal, the captain sent a cable advising us that the coal was too hot" to continue the voyage, said C. P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1992 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jun Mori on Wednesday announced that he has resigned from the Los Angeles Harbor Commission, ending a 15-year tenure marked as much by his alleged conflicts of interest as his powerful role in the port's success. "I wanted to tell you all that I have asked the mayor to relieve me of my duties here as a member of the board. Today will be my last meeting," Mori said at the commission meeting in a brief statement that caught even many top port officials by surprise.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|