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Kamau Daaood

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kamau Daaood was just a teen when he began reading his poems in public. Finding early inspiration in a performance of the LeRoi Jones play "Black Mass," he hooked up with the Watts Writers Workshop and later with the Pan-Afrikan People's Arkestra, led by pianist and composer Horace Tapscott--all before the age of 20. These days, Daaood worries that youngsters in the South-Central Los Angeles streets he calls home are growing up without the cultural opportunities he enjoyed in the late '60s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2005 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Only moments after what looks to be the last of the rain, Kamau Daaood is catching the first bit of sun. It's early yet, so it's pretty much just him and the birds and someone already set to watering their little patch of cement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2005 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Only moments after what looks to be the last of the rain, Kamau Daaood is catching the first bit of sun. It's early yet, so it's pretty much just him and the birds and someone already set to watering their little patch of cement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1997 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On those busy nights when Leimert Park in the Crenshaw district is brimming with musicians, poets and even a few chess and hard-slamming domino players, you can usually find Kamau Daaood stroking his graying goatee and dispensing wisdom to young writers. For nearly 30 years, since his days as a teenager cutting his literary teeth in the acclaimed Watts Writers Workshop, Daaood has been a forceful, eloquent presence among Los Angeles poets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1997 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On those busy nights when Leimert Park in the Crenshaw district is brimming with musicians, poets and even a few chess and hard-slamming domino players, you can usually find Kamau Daaood stroking his graying goatee and dispensing wisdom to young writers. For nearly 30 years, since his days as a teenager cutting his literary teeth in the acclaimed Watts Writers Workshop, Daaood has been a forceful, eloquent presence among Los Angeles poets.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1997
Jazz poet Kamau Daa'ood, who recently released his debut CD "Leimert Park," featuring such jazz artists as Billy Higgins and Horace Tapscot, performs at Hollywood Mogul, 1650 N. Schraeder (formerly Hudson Avenue), Hollywood, Thursday at 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. Information: (213) 465-7449. Daa'ood appears at Santa Monica College Amphitheater, 1900 W. Pico Blvd., Dec. 4 at an 11 a.m. free performance. Information: (310) 450-5150, Ext. 9966.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1997
A benefit for Winifred R. Harris' Between Lines Company will be given by the troupe Wednesday at Hudson Theatre, 6541 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood. Titled "Dance 'n' Words: Artists in Support of Artists," the benefit will feature the Harris company, plus guests poet Kamau Daa'ood, and actors Khandi Alexander, Susan Parker, Jennifer Bowens and Malcolm Jamaal Warner. A reception will begin the event at 6 p.m., with the performance at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25. Information: (213) 465-6533.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1996
Music and poetry readings by Kamau Daaood, Manuel Luna, Russell Leong and Canta Luz will highlight the eight-day Nommo International Word Smith Festival starting Monday at the California Coffee House, 4455 Overland Ave., in Culver City. Daaood will be joined on opening night by Reuben Guevara, Chung Mi Kim, Doug Knot, Sequoia Mecier, OJenke and Eric Priestly in "Elements of Ivory and Dusk" at 8:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1999
Regarding Don Heckman's "Sounds That (Should Have) Made L.A. Famous" and "L.A.'s Lost Street of Dreams" by Kamau Daaood (Aug. 29): Certainly Central Avenue's decline had plenty to do with the rise of West Coast cool jazz, the ongoing exodus of some of L.A.'s best and brightest to the East Coast (Eric Dolphy, Charles Mingus, Billy Higgins), and shifting demographic patterns and changing legal institutions (especially the 1948 Supreme Court decision to ban restrictive covenants). But there are two other key culprits in this crime: Angelenos' tendency to bury our culture and to forget our histories, and Americans' baffling neglect of jazz music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1999
In "L.A.'s Lost Street of Dreams" (Aug. 29), Kamau Daaood makes some very keen observations about Los Angeles' often overlooked role in the development of jazz. From the 1930s through the 1950s, when important local artists like Gerald Wilson, Big Jay McNeely and Gerald Wiggins were making real contributions to the golden age of jazz, the nation's, and the world's, attention was focused across town on the golden age of Hollywood. Partially, as a result, the great accomplishments on Central Avenue have all but been forgotten.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kamau Daaood was just a teen when he began reading his poems in public. Finding early inspiration in a performance of the LeRoi Jones play "Black Mass," he hooked up with the Watts Writers Workshop and later with the Pan-Afrikan People's Arkestra, led by pianist and composer Horace Tapscott--all before the age of 20. These days, Daaood worries that youngsters in the South-Central Los Angeles streets he calls home are growing up without the cultural opportunities he enjoyed in the late '60s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998
Area poets and artists will discuss the role of art as a weapon against oppression at an evening discussion tonight sponsored by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The museum's fall 1998 writer-in-residence Michael Datcher will lead the discussion, "Renaissances of Resistance: The Documentation of Black Humanity as a Weapon Against Oppression in Leimert Park and Harlem."
NEWS
June 26, 1994
I am in a rage after reading the self-serving letter of Wanda Coleman (June 12) concerning the Watts Writers Workshop. It is well-documented that the workshop was infiltrated by more than one agency. (One FBI informant) admittedly was responsible for the fiery destruction of the workshop building as well as other community structures. Being married to one of the members of the workshop the past 17 years has given me the opportunity to know many past members who unquestionably have "works of solid literary merit"--Eric Priestly, poet and author of the novel "Raw Dog"; poets K. Curtis Lyle, Kamau Daa-ood, Ojenke; Quincy Troupe, co-author of the Miles Davis biography "Miles," and the Watts Prophets.
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