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Kamau Daaood

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998
Area poets and artists will discuss the role of art as a weapon against oppression at an evening discussion tonight sponsored by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The museum's fall 1998 writer-in-residence Michael Datcher will lead the discussion, "Renaissances of Resistance: The Documentation of Black Humanity as a Weapon Against Oppression in Leimert Park and Harlem."
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NEWS
June 26, 1994
I am in a rage after reading the self-serving letter of Wanda Coleman (June 12) concerning the Watts Writers Workshop. It is well-documented that the workshop was infiltrated by more than one agency. (One FBI informant) admittedly was responsible for the fiery destruction of the workshop building as well as other community structures. Being married to one of the members of the workshop the past 17 years has given me the opportunity to know many past members who unquestionably have "works of solid literary merit"--Eric Priestly, poet and author of the novel "Raw Dog"; poets K. Curtis Lyle, Kamau Daa-ood, Ojenke; Quincy Troupe, co-author of the Miles Davis biography "Miles," and the Watts Prophets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2000
It was uncharacteristically uncool of Don Heckman to flash the race card in his too-brief coverage of "LA Jazz 2000" ("USC Showcases Area Stalwarts," April 15). In the three years that I've attended, the complexion of the artists has been of no consequence to the audience, a diverse group that only cares about good jazz. Not that it should matter, but if Heckman is keeping a tally, the 1998 headliners were Wallace Roney, Kenny Garrett, the B-Sharp Jazz Quartet and Jon Faddis. In 1999 they included Kamau Daaood and McCoy Tyner.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2001 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the conviction and fire of artists steeped in '60s-era black consciousness, New York's the Last Poets and L.A. wordsmith Kamau Daaood assessed the state of African American culture on Thursday at the El Rey Theatre. Their performances illuminated the roots of hip-hop, reminding us that the beat--and the Benjamins--aren't all that matters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2011
MUSIC Uh Huh Her On the heels of their recently released second album, "Nocturnes," the indie-electro duo of Camila Grey and Leisha Hailey drop by the Sunset Strip for a stop on the Keep a Breast Tour. Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Jarrod Gorbel, formerly of the Honorary Title, will open. House of Blues, 8430 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. 8:30 p.m. $22.50. (323) 848-5100. http://www.houseofblues.com Mastodon With "The Hunter," the Atlanta metal quartet continues its reign as one of the most potent and adventurous crossover acts, pairing the precision and thrash of the underground with the melody and epic scope needed to headline festivals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
L.A. Jazz '99 at USC continued on Wednesday with another full day of rewarding jazz events. And, once again, the size of the attendance failed to reflect the quality of the music. The evening's program, for example, with the Ralph Penland Polygon Quintet opening for Kamau Daaood and his Army of Healers, was filled with high-quality, compelling music. Yet Bovard Auditorium had rows of empty seats.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1989 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Three black poets whose works stress racial equality and concern for the environment will take the stage tonight at McCabe's in Santa Monica. The show, which starts at 8 p.m., will include readings by Wanda Coleman, Michelle T. Clinton and Kamau Daaood. Coleman has published three books of poetry and a recent book of short stories, "A War of Eyes." In January, she was selected as Pasadena City College's poet of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Musicians performing on behalf of worthy causes don't always respond with worthy performances. And sometimes they do. There was a bit of both Saturday on the opening day of the seventh annual Jazz at Drew festival, a two-day event designed to benefit the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, which sits across 120th Street from Martin Luther King Jr. Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Jazz singing is one of the most elusive of performing arts. With performers ranging from Louis Armstrong to Andy Bey, from Sarah Vaughan to Diana Krall comfortably positioned within the same far-reaching tent, the genre's definitions can be as varied as the artists themselves. Even granting that diversity, however, singer Dwight Trible has to be considered a rarity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was all about dialogue when poet Kamau Daaood teamed with a nine-piece jazz ensemble at the Vision Theatre in Leimert Park on Saturday night: dialogue between words and music, between instruments and voice, between words spoken and sung, between audience and performers. And each component served to intensify the other during this unusually spirited coming together.
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