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Kandahar

WORLD
July 14, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bomber struck a Kandahar mosque where a memorial service was being held Thursday for the assassinated half brother of Afghan President Hamid Karzai. The attack killed at least four people and could mark the start of a violent power struggle in southern Afghanistan in the wake of Ahmed Wali Karzai's death. A number of high-ranking officials were present at the time of the attack, according to the Kandahar provincial government. The dead included a prominent cleric and a child, and 15 other people were injured, the Interior Ministry said.
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WORLD
July 14, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bomber struck a Kandahar mosque where a memorial service was being held Thursday for the assassinated half brother of President Hamid Karzai. The attack killed at least four people and could mark the start of a violent power struggle in the wake of Ahmed Wali Karzai's death. A number of high-ranking officials were present at the time of the attack, according to the Kandahar provincial government. The dead included a prominent cleric and a child, and 15 other people were injured, the Interior Ministry said.
WORLD
July 12, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
For the Americans trying to pacify the south of Afghanistan, Ahmed Wali Karzai might prove even more troublesome in death than he was in life. The younger half brother of President Hamid Karzai, shot to death in his Kandahar home Tuesday by a trusted family associate who was also a commander in the Afghan police force, was the principal power broker in Kandahar province, the ancestral home of the Karzai clan. His vast influence, rooted in business and family connections, made him a seemingly indispensible Western ally in a long-volatile region considered pivotal to the success of the American-led military effort.
WORLD
July 12, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
President Hamid Karzai's powerful and controversial half brother, Ahmed Wali Karzai, was shot and killed Tuesday by a senior member of his police security detail — an assassination that could set off a chaotic power struggle in a province considered key to Western military efforts. Ahmed Wali Karzai was the undisputed kingmaker of Kandahar province, the ancestral home of the Karzai clan, and word of his death sent shock waves through the province and Afghanistan's wider political world.
WORLD
June 11, 2011 | By Hashmat Baktash and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A bomb planted by a road killed 15 Afghan civilians Saturday, including eight children, in a volatile southern district where American forces last year made a major push to dislodge the Taliban, provincial officials said. Arghandab district, just outside the south's main city of Kandahar, was the scene of heavy fighting in the summer and fall of 2010. Military progress in the south has been touted as a sign of the success of last year's U.S. troop surge, but insurgents in recent weeks have been filtering back into some key districts, seeking to reclaim former strongholds.
WORLD
June 9, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
It was supposed to have been a festive occasion: a pre-wedding party held under the stars on a warm night. But suspected insurgent gunmen burst in on the gathering in a village field, fatally shooting nine men, including the groom, Afghan officials said. Grieving family members and provincial officials said the attack -- which took place around 1 a.m. Thursday in a remote area of Nangarhar province, in Afghanistan's east -- might have been due to the fact that a relative of the targeted clan served as the district administrator.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bomber struck a security gathering in Afghanistan's north on Saturday, injuring a provincial governor and the German commander of foreign troops in the region, and killing at least six people — including two senior Afghan police commanders and two German soldiers, Afghan and coalition officials said. The bombing, which took place inside the heavily guarded governor's compound in Takhar province, was the latest deadly strike by insurgents against government installations in the weeks since the Taliban movement declared the start of its spring offensive.
WORLD
May 22, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
The medical trainees were just settling in for lunch when the bomber struck. The suicide attack Saturday at a well-guarded Afghan military hospital complex in the center of the capital killed at least six people, injured about two dozen others and revived persistent fears about insurgents' ability to infiltrate sensitive government and military installations. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack. The thunderous blast, which echoed across much of the city, marked the first major assault inside Kabul since the insurgents announced the start of their "spring offensive" at the beginning of May. The midday explosion, on the first day of the Afghan work week, took place in a part of the sprawling 400-bed hospital compound mainly devoted to medical training, Defense Ministry spokesman Gen. Mohammed Zahir Azimi told reporters.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
An Army private accused of killing a Taliban prisoner last year in Afghanistan has agreed to plead guilty, according to his attorney, even though several military psychiatrists concluded he was suffering severe mental illness at the time. Pfc. David W. Lawrence is expected to receive a "substantially" reduced sentence for the killing of Mullah Mohebullah, a senior Taliban commander who was shot in the face last October while being guarded by Lawrence at a U.S. detention facility in Kandahar province, said James Culp, the defendant's lawyer.
WORLD
May 8, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Fighting erupted for a second day Sunday between Taliban gunmen and Afghan security forces in the southern city of Kandahar, demonstrating the insurgents' determination to maintain a foothold in the city they consider their spiritual home. Afghanistan's Interior Ministry said Sunday that the death toll in clashes that broke out a day earlier had risen to 25 -- all but two of them Taliban fighters. The Taliban brushed aside the lopsided toll, instead boasting that the fighting had all but paralyzed the country's second-largest city.
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