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BUSINESS
March 29, 2005 | From Associated Press
For AMC Entertainment Inc., it's no longer hooray for Hollywood. AMC, the nation's second-largest chain of movie theaters, said it was moving its film-booking office out of Los Angeles. The company said it was relocating the operation to that well-known film center: Kansas City, Mo.
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TRAVEL
February 28, 2014 | By Cynthia Mines
KANSAS CITY, Mo.  - Kansas City is a fitting home field for the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum: It was here that the first professional league for black players was formed in 1920 and where Jackie Robinson was playing in 1945 when he was recruited by the Brooklyn Dodgers to be the player who would break the color barrier. And it was the Kansas City Monarchs who won the first Negro World Series in 1924. The museum, founded in 1990, has stepped admirably to the plate to preserve the history of the half-century when black players were shut out of professional baseball and formed their own teams.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2001
* Set fire with Matchbox Twenty at the Sandstone Amphitheatre on Sept. 16. 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, Kan., (913) 721-3400. * "Against Design" is an exhibition of contemporary design featuring 10 sculptors and painters from California, Canada, Sweden, Germany, New York and the Netherlands. Through Sept. 2. Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd., Kansas City, Mo., (816) 753-5784.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Consider some of the things that have bound our nation together: Universal postal service at a flat rate, whether you live in Santa Monica or Sitka, Alaska. Interstate highways, built with taxpayer funds and free of tolls. Regulated phone and electric service, with lifeline rates for the economically disadvantaged. These were all based on a social contract honoring the notion that essential infrastructure should be available to all - indeed, that those normally left by the side of the economic road might be most in need.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
No Kansas City Tax to Lure McDonnell: Kansas City, Mo., voters rejected 62% to 38% a property tax increase to help build a factory for McDonnell Douglas Corp. if the aircraft maker decides to put one there. In June, St. Louis-based McDonnell Douglas named the city among others under consideration for a plant to build its MD-12 passenger jet.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In spite of a campaign to make August a "murder-free" month in Kansas City, Mo., 15 homicides were recorded, the most for any month this year. In an average month, the city of 430,000 has about nine slayings. But a decline in less serious assaults led some organizers, such as City Councilwoman Carol Coe, to say the effort should continue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2007 | From the Associated Press
After eight years and $94 million, the expansive new addition to the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Mo., opens to the public Saturday. The Bloch Building, designed by New York architect Steven Holl, flanks the venerable Nelson-Atkins on its east side, spilling glass and metal next to the museum's original 74-year-old main hall.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities in Michigan and Missouri tried to determine how copies of Aviation Week and Chemical Week magazines had turned up in an abandoned Al Qaeda camp in Afghanistan. A copy of the aviation magazine bearing the Ann Arbor, Mich., address of an information company called ProQuest and the name "Universal Microfilms Inc." was found earlier this week. Also found was a chemistry text and a copy of Chemical Weekly addressed to the Kansas City, Mo., public library.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
World War I ended nearly 90 years ago, only a few of its U.S. veterans are still alive and, about a decade ago, its national monument was closed after years of neglect and deterioration. But this weekend, the "war to end all wars" takes center stage when the National World War I Museum opens in Kansas City, Mo., giving the public a chance to learn about -- and from -- the conflict that catapulted the United States toward superpower status.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2003 | Peter G. Gosselin and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
As President Bush heads for the Midwest today to trumpet his economic program, his first stop, in Kansas City, Mo., illustrates the trouble that he faces with the election year's approach. The metropolitan area has been walloped by the loss of nearly 10,000 high-paying telecom jobs and -- in a recovery that's so far jobless -- there is little relief in sight.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
A snowstorm that blanketed Kansas City, Mo., Thursday slowed the investigation into a deadly natural gas explosion, as well as efforts to identify the person who died in the blast, officials said. The Kansas City Fire Department, which finished its on-site investigation Wednesday afternoon, planned to release a report next week on what caused the fatal blast Tuesday that injured several people and destroyed JJ's restaurant , department spokesman James Garrett told the Los Angeles Times.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
In charging the bishop of Kansas City with failure to report child abuse, prosecutors in Missouri have done something unprecedented in the long, troubling saga of the sexual abuse scandal in the U.S. Roman Catholic Church: hold a member of the church hierarchy criminally accountable for the alleged crimes of a priest. What remains to be seen is whether the indictment of Bishop Robert Finn will be an isolated event or will encourage prosecutors elsewhere to investigate allegations of coverup against members of the church leadership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Kansas City, Mo. -- It was just before 3 a.m. when Ruth and Shady Abadir walked through the double doors that lead into the thumping heart of the International House of Prayer . Outside, the rolling suburbs of south Kansas City slumbered beneath a moonless sky, the roads empty except for the occasional deer. Inside, more than 100 people worshiped to the sound of an 11-member Christian rock band, fulfilling a commitment to keep prayer going 24 hours a day. "We've just shifted our schedule to make it work," said Ruth, raising her voice over the pulsating beat.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
During the warm months, when students at Westport High School got too hot, they cooled down by moving to one of the many vacant classrooms on campus. It was one of the advantages of having 400 students assigned to a school that could hold 1,200. The downside became apparent last week, though, when the Kansas City school board voted to close Westport and 25 other schools -- nearly half of the district's campuses. Big-city districts shutter schools all the time. Cities such as Denver and Portland, Ore., have seen childless young families repopulate their urban cores and have adjusted accordingly.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2010 | By Don Lee
As Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke appeared to gain enough backing for confirmation to a second term, the central bank offered a more upbeat assessment of the economy than it did last month but still affirmed a pledge to keep interest rates near zero for "an extended period." For the first time in a year, however, the Fed rate-setting panel's statement, issued at the end of a two-day meeting Wednesday, came with a dissenting vote, which could presage an earlier-than-expected move to raise rates.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2007 | From the Associated Press
After eight years and $94 million, the expansive new addition to the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Mo., opens to the public Saturday. The Bloch Building, designed by New York architect Steven Holl, flanks the venerable Nelson-Atkins on its east side, spilling glass and metal next to the museum's original 74-year-old main hall.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Two pipe bombs sent late last month to offices in Kansas City may be linked to a suspect who has been sending increasingly threatening letters to financial institutions since at least 2005. Officials have suggested in both cases that the devices were not working bombs that could have exploded. The devices appear to be a sign that the suspect, who calls himself "The Bishop," may be closer to sending live bombs, said Fred Burton, a counterterrorism expert.
SPORTS
December 8, 1987 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Nobody has ever played a big league game in both halves of Kansas City's sports complex, and nobody was expected to, but that was before Bo Jackson. Next Sunday, Jackson will become the first. The left fielder from Royals Stadium will become a tailback at Arrowhead, but of course, not for the home team this time. Arrowhead is almost sold out, which will mean a crowd twice the size of what the 2-10 Chiefs have been getting. Why are Kansas City fans coming, to praise Bo or to bury him?
NATIONAL
February 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Two pipe bombs sent late last month to offices in Kansas City may be linked to a suspect who has been sending increasingly threatening letters to financial institutions since at least 2005. Officials have suggested in both cases that the devices were not working bombs that could have exploded. The devices appear to be a sign that the suspect, who calls himself "The Bishop," may be closer to sending live bombs, said Fred Burton, a counterterrorism expert.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
World War I ended nearly 90 years ago, only a few of its U.S. veterans are still alive and, about a decade ago, its national monument was closed after years of neglect and deterioration. But this weekend, the "war to end all wars" takes center stage when the National World War I Museum opens in Kansas City, Mo., giving the public a chance to learn about -- and from -- the conflict that catapulted the United States toward superpower status.
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