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SPORTS
March 20, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The NCAA membership of seven Kansas schools could be jeopardized if the state Legislature enacts a law giving them special protection from enforcement procedures, an NCAA official said. However, Steve Morgan, associate executive director of the NCAA, said he does not believe that Executive Director Dick Schultz was making a threat in remarks interpreted by some as warning that Kansas schools could be "kicked out" of the NCAA if such a law were passed.
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NATIONAL
March 28, 2009 | Associated Press
Gov. Kathleen Sebelius signed a bill Friday to ensure that women and girls seeking abortions in Kansas are allowed to see ultrasound images or hear their fetus' heartbeat before the procedure. The bill, which takes effect July 1, amends a state law requiring doctors to obtain a patient's informed consent before performing an abortion.
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NATIONAL
March 24, 2009 | Robin Abcarian
Opening arguments got underway Monday in the criminal case against Dr. George Tiller, one of the only physicians in the country who provides late-term abortions. And by day's end, it was clear that the case could hinge on such nonmedical issues as who paid for copy paper and toner, the meaning of a hug and whether selling a beat-up sedan to a colleague can constitute proof of guilt.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | Reuters
A law that requires a minor seeking an abortion to notify a parent or legal guardian took effect Wednesday in Kansas.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
In another blow to the sagging domestic uranium industry, the Supreme Court Wednesday overturned a ban on imports of low-cost foreign uranium to supply American nuclear reactors. The unanimous ruling was a victory for the Reagan Administration's free trade policy and for users of nuclear power, including Southern California Edison, which told the court that reliance on domestic producers would raise costs to its customers.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday let stand a ruling that all handicapped children, even those who lack any learning ability, are entitled to education paid for by the public schools. The justices without dissent denied an appeal from a New Hampshire school district that was ordered to provide education and "related services" for a profoundly retarded 13-year old, even though it was conceded that the child could not "benefit from education." The child, known only as Timothy W.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dr. Yolanda Huet-Vaughn emerged from the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Ft. Leavenworth April 6, free after eight months in a military prison, it looked to be the final chapter of an undeniably fractious story. Irksome memories still poked at people, of course. Few in this region will soon forget how the 40-year-old medical doctor and Army Reserve captain so publicly refused to serve when called to active duty during the Persian Gulf War.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2009 | Robin Abcarian
Opening arguments got underway Monday in the criminal case against Dr. George Tiller, one of the only physicians in the country who provides late-term abortions. And by day's end, it was clear that the case could hinge on such nonmedical issues as who paid for copy paper and toner, the meaning of a hug and whether selling a beat-up sedan to a colleague can constitute proof of guilt.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2009 | Associated Press
Gov. Kathleen Sebelius signed a bill Friday to ensure that women and girls seeking abortions in Kansas are allowed to see ultrasound images or hear their fetus' heartbeat before the procedure. The bill, which takes effect July 1, amends a state law requiring doctors to obtain a patient's informed consent before performing an abortion.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dr. Yolanda Huet-Vaughn emerged from the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Ft. Leavenworth April 6, free after eight months in a military prison, it looked to be the final chapter of an undeniably fractious story. Irksome memories still poked at people, of course. Few in this region will soon forget how the 40-year-old medical doctor and Army Reserve captain so publicly refused to serve when called to active duty during the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | Reuters
A law that requires a minor seeking an abortion to notify a parent or legal guardian took effect Wednesday in Kansas.
SPORTS
March 20, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The NCAA membership of seven Kansas schools could be jeopardized if the state Legislature enacts a law giving them special protection from enforcement procedures, an NCAA official said. However, Steve Morgan, associate executive director of the NCAA, said he does not believe that Executive Director Dick Schultz was making a threat in remarks interpreted by some as warning that Kansas schools could be "kicked out" of the NCAA if such a law were passed.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday let stand a ruling that all handicapped children, even those who lack any learning ability, are entitled to education paid for by the public schools. The justices without dissent denied an appeal from a New Hampshire school district that was ordered to provide education and "related services" for a profoundly retarded 13-year old, even though it was conceded that the child could not "benefit from education." The child, known only as Timothy W.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
In another blow to the sagging domestic uranium industry, the Supreme Court Wednesday overturned a ban on imports of low-cost foreign uranium to supply American nuclear reactors. The unanimous ruling was a victory for the Reagan Administration's free trade policy and for users of nuclear power, including Southern California Edison, which told the court that reliance on domestic producers would raise costs to its customers.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
An Omaha doctor said he would perform third-term abortions in Kansas after the slaying there of abortion provider Dr. George Tiller, but would not say whether he would open a new facility or offer the procedure at an existing practice. Dr. LeRoy Carhart spoke one day after Tiller's family decided not to reopen his Wichita clinic. Carhart declined to discuss his plans in detail during a telephone interview. Tiller's clinic was one of the few facilities in the country that performed third-trimester abortions.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Kansas Supreme Court temporarily blocked a grand jury Tuesday from obtaining patient records from a physician who is one of the nation's few providers of late-term abortions. The grand jury is investigating whether Dr. George Tiller has broken Kansas laws restricting abortion, as many abortion opponents allege. The grand jury subpoenaed the medical files of about 2,000 women, including some who decided against having abortions.
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