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WORLD
May 8, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The leader of Jaish-e-Muhammad, one of Pakistan's most feared militant groups, recently drew hundreds of worshipers to the Batha Mosque, where the theme of speeches and sermons often covers the same topic: holy war against the West. Young men streamed into the beige building in north Karachi chanting "God is great!" on the day Maulana Masood Azhar spoke. Though Jaish-e-Muhammad has been banned in Pakistan since 2002, local police officers joined mosque guards in cordoning off the garbage-strewn dirt lanes surrounding the mosque and providing security for the rally.
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WORLD
May 6, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
One of the men arrested in Pakistan this week in connection with the failed attempt to bomb Times Square is a member of Jaish-e-Muhammad, an Al Qaeda-allied Pakistani militant group, intelligence sources in the city of Karachi said Wednesday. The revelation marks the first indication that a specific Pakistani militant group has been associated with the case of Faisal Shahzad, the 30-year-old Pakistani American charged in the failed bomb plot. But it does not necessarily mean that the organization engineered the plot or directed the suspect.
WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez
Name a cash cow in this sprawling city of ragged slums and glass-walled office buildings and it's almost certain there's an organized crime syndicate behind it. The illegal operations, routinely referred to as mafias, are everywhere. There's a land mafia that commandeers prime real estate, a sugar mafia that conspires to control sugar prices, and even a railway mafia that forges train tickets and pilfers locomotive parts. For those on the city's bottom rung, however, the underworld entity they revile the most is the water tanker mafia, a network of trucking firms that teams up with corrupt bureaucrats to turn water into liquid gold worth tens of millions of dollars each year.
WORLD
March 9, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez
The suspected Al Qaeda operative arrested in Karachi over the weekend was not the Southern California native wanted by the United States on treason charges for his involvement in the terrorist network, Pakistani intelligence officials said Monday. Pakistani security officials had initially asserted that the Islamic extremist they had captured in the country's largest city late Saturday was Adam Gadahn of Riverside, a spokesman and top propagandist for the Al Qaeda terrorist network.
WORLD
March 8, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The American Al Qaeda operative arrested in Karachi over the weekend was not the Southern California native wanted by the U.S. on treason charges for his involvement in the terror network, Pakistani intelligence officials said Monday. Pakistani security officials initially asserted that the American Islamic extremist they had captured in the country's largest city late Saturday night was Adam Gadahn of Riverside, a spokesman and top propagandist for the Al Qaeda terror network. However, by early Monday morning, doubts arose about those initial reports.
WORLD
March 8, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez
U.S. officials cast doubt early Monday on Pakistani intelligence statements that Karachi officials had arrested a Southern California native, a top propagandist for Al Qaeda who is wanted by the U.S. on treason charges. U.S. intelligence agencies spent Sunday sorting out conflicting reports on the purported arrest of Adam Gadahn of Riverside. By late Sunday night, U.S. officials said the picture remained unclear. "In terms of who may have been arrested, the Pakistani rumor mill belched out three very different possibilities in about six hours," one U.S. official said.
WORLD
March 2, 2010 | Alex Rodriguez
In Karachi's Baldia neighborhood, a working-class mix of Pashtun and other Pakistanis, it took an accidental explosion amid piles of suicide vests and grenades to unearth a cell of Taliban militants in a house that neighbors believed sheltered a quiet Pashtun family. "We thought they were fruit sellers," said Mohammed Zahid, 24, who lives across the path from the heavily damaged house. Police said the Jan. 8 blast killed seven Taliban militants who had been planning to attack a Baldia police training center.
WORLD
February 28, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez
In Karachi's Baldia neighborhood, a working-class mix of Pashtun and other Pakistanis, it took an accidental explosion amid piles of suicide vests and grenades to unearth a cell of Taliban militants in a house that neighbors believed sheltered a quiet Pashtun family. "We thought they were fruit sellers," said Mohammed Zahid, 24, who lives across the path from the heavily damaged house. Police said the Jan. 8 blast killed seven Taliban militants who had been planning to attack a Baldia police training center.
WORLD
February 19, 2010 | By Laura King and Alex Rodriguez
Reporting from Kabul, Afghanistan, and Karachi, Pakistan -- A campaign against senior members of the Afghan Taliban has netted a second major figure, the "shadow governor" of a northern province who presided over a dramatic buildup of forces that took over entire districts and harried NATO troops, Afghan and Pakistani officials revealed Thursday. Word of the arrest of Mullah Abdul Salam and a Taliban associate follows disclosure this week of the recent capture, also in Pakistan, of the Afghan Taliban's top military commander, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, whose influence has been described as second only to that of the movement's spiritual leader and supreme commander, Mullah Mohammed Omar.
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