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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
Herbert von Karajan, the venerable conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, fell ill shortly before his orchestra was to leave for its current American tour. At concerts in Ambassador Auditorium Wednesday and Thursday, his place was taken by James Levine, conductor and music director of the Metropolitan Opera. The Wednesday event could have developed into a gargantuan battle between the spirit of the missing maestro and the will of the visiting one, but nothing of the kind occurred.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986 | MARC SHULGOLD
When bug bites man, it usually doesn't make the papers. But when that man is revered conductor Herbert von Karajan, it is news-- bad news. Particularly for Peter Gelb of Columbia Artists Management.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Conductor Herbert von Karajan will not accompany the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra on its Sunday-Nov. 1 tour of the United States and Japan because of illness, the orchestra announced Friday. James Levine will conduct the orchestra in Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena on Oct. 22 and 23 as well as in New York and Chicago. Seiji Ozawa will conduct in Boston and Tokyo, the orchestra said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1986
The Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by Herbert von Karajan, will play concerts in four cities in the United States, including Pasadena, in October. The U.S. tour begins Oct. 15 in Symphony Hall, Boston, with a program of Brahms' Third and First symphonies. In the Metropolitan Opera House in New York Oct. 19, Karajan will lead a program consisting of Mozart's Divertimento in D, K. 334, and the Ninth Symphony by Bruckner. After a 10-year absence, the Berlin ensemble will return to Chicago Oct.
BOOKS
May 18, 1986 | Martin Bernheimer, Bernheimer, Times music critic, first encountered Herbert von Karajan at the Vienna Staatsoper in 1958 and has been watching and listening ever since--with mixed feelings.
There are lots of famous conductors plying their mysterious, if not mystical, trade these days, but the number of genuine superstar conductors probably can be counted on three fingers. Leonard Bernstein is the most glamorous and, in America at least, the best publicized. Georg Solti is the most dramatic and, perhaps, the worst publicized. Then there is Herbert von Karajan--the perfectionist, the intellectual, the technical wizard, the schemer, the crybaby.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1986 | From Associated Press
Herbert von Karajan, the famed music director of the Berlin Philharmonic, has been flown to the United States for medical treatment, the orchestra's general manager said Friday. Manager Wolfgang Stresemann declined to give any details and would not say where in the United States Karajan was. The Vienna Philharmonic announced the cancellation of the orchestra's two concerts under Karajan's baton scheduled for Jan. 11 and 12. Karajan, 77, has suffered back ailments in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Herbert von Karajan, 77, the famed director of the Berlin Philharmonic orchestra, has been flown to the United States for medical treatment, Wolfgang Stresemann, the orchestra's general manager, said Friday. Stresemann declined to give any other details in a telephone interview and would not say where in the United States Von Karajan is. Meanwhile, the Vienna Philharmonic announced the cancellation of the orchestra's two concerts under Von Karajan's baton scheduled for Jan. 11 and 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
"Der Rosenkavalier," Richard Strauss' achingly romantic ode to the Vienna of Maria Theresa and to the erotic innuendoes of a predecessor named Mozart, was long overdue for a new production at the War Memorial Opera House. The old "Rosenkavalier," an outrageously ugly cardboard-kitsch extravaganza, violated the elegance, the charm and the glitter of this magical score even when the production was first seen here in 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
It hasn't been the best of all possible Philharmonic seasons. At the moment, our orchestra is a faceless ensemble in the uneasy state of flux--probably a tired and possibly a demoralized ensemble at that. Contrary to popular propaganda, all isn't necessarily well that ends well. Still, one must give the Fleischmann his due.
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