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Karen Hughes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2001
Re the April 1 profile of Bush advisor Karen Hughes: Assuming it wasn't an April Fool's prank, the article says that a Hughes deputy contends that the only people who might object to Hughes' enormous influence on President Bush would be those who are "ideologically opposed to her message or do not want the messenger to be an intense, smart woman." So that's his conclusion? That to disapprove of professional handlers and spinners and public relations geniuses having disproportionately larger roles in American politics makes one either a sexist or a Democrat?
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NATIONAL
November 1, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Karen Hughes, a presidential confidant entrusted with the arduous job of reversing America's plummeting image abroad, announced Wednesday that she would resign from the administration and return to Texas. Hughes, 50, one of the last members of President Bush's Texas inner circle still in government, said she would leave her post as head of the State Department's public diplomacy programs at the end of the year.
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WORLD
October 22, 2005 | Dinda Jouhana and Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writers
Karen P. Hughes, President Bush's public relations envoy, came here Friday to promote the United States but instead found herself facing a skeptical audience and tough questions. Meeting with students at Syarif Hidayatullah Islamic University, the undersecretary of State for public diplomacy sought to explain the invasion of Iraq and the U.S. push for democracy around the world. But while Hughes focused on changing America's image among Muslims, the students sought to change America's policies.
WORLD
October 22, 2005 | Dinda Jouhana and Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writers
Karen P. Hughes, President Bush's public relations envoy, came here Friday to promote the United States but instead found herself facing a skeptical audience and tough questions. Meeting with students at Syarif Hidayatullah Islamic University, the undersecretary of State for public diplomacy sought to explain the invasion of Iraq and the U.S. push for democracy around the world. But while Hughes focused on changing America's image among Muslims, the students sought to change America's policies.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | GERALDINE BAUM and ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When George W. Bush was preparing to make the most important speech of his young presidency, Karen Hughes took a knife to the work of the White House wordsmiths. Hughes, the ultimate arbiter of this president's public persona, turned the speech to Congress upside-down so that Bush first proposed some new programs--and then got to his controversial tax cuts.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush will nominate one of his closest longtime advisors to a key State Department post to try to repair the United States' image abroad, especially in the Arab world, a senior U.S. official said. The administration official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the announcement that Bush had selected Karen Hughes, 48, to be undersecretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs, would be made this week. The position requires Senate confirmation.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2004 | From the Washington Post
President Bush's confidant Karen P. Hughes returned to the public stage Sunday with plans to weave her combative defense of the White House into a six-week book tour, then go on the campaign payroll in mid-August. Prominent Republicans outside the White House have been lamenting for months the absence of her political acumen to assist a campaign and administration that have suffered repeated public relations setbacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Karen Hughes is talking about her "Thelma and Louise" adventure again. An uprising is spreading across Iraq, and Hughes has been fiercely defending the Bush administration in back-to-back television interviews. But in a private moment, she relishes the memory of traveling state to state with her buddy Mary Matalin during the 2002 midterm elections, "helping candidates who were running against women or who wanted to reach out to women."
WORLD
March 15, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Karen P. Hughes, one of President Bush's closest advisors, was nominated Monday to take charge of the struggling State Department effort to improve America's image abroad, especially in the Islamic world. "Clearly, in the world after Sept. 11, we must do a better job of engaging with the Muslim world," said Hughes, who appeared before reporters with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. "If the United States does not act aggressively to define itself, the extremists will gladly do the job for us."
NATIONAL
November 1, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Karen Hughes, a presidential confidant entrusted with the arduous job of reversing America's plummeting image abroad, announced Wednesday that she would resign from the administration and return to Texas. Hughes, 50, one of the last members of President Bush's Texas inner circle still in government, said she would leave her post as head of the State Department's public diplomacy programs at the end of the year.
WORLD
March 15, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Karen P. Hughes, one of President Bush's closest advisors, was nominated Monday to take charge of the struggling State Department effort to improve America's image abroad, especially in the Islamic world. "Clearly, in the world after Sept. 11, we must do a better job of engaging with the Muslim world," said Hughes, who appeared before reporters with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. "If the United States does not act aggressively to define itself, the extremists will gladly do the job for us."
NATIONAL
March 13, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush will nominate one of his closest longtime advisors to a key State Department post to try to repair the United States' image abroad, especially in the Arab world, a senior U.S. official said. The administration official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the announcement that Bush had selected Karen Hughes, 48, to be undersecretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs, would be made this week. The position requires Senate confirmation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Karen Hughes is talking about her "Thelma and Louise" adventure again. An uprising is spreading across Iraq, and Hughes has been fiercely defending the Bush administration in back-to-back television interviews. But in a private moment, she relishes the memory of traveling state to state with her buddy Mary Matalin during the 2002 midterm elections, "helping candidates who were running against women or who wanted to reach out to women."
NATIONAL
March 29, 2004 | From the Washington Post
President Bush's confidant Karen P. Hughes returned to the public stage Sunday with plans to weave her combative defense of the White House into a six-week book tour, then go on the campaign payroll in mid-August. Prominent Republicans outside the White House have been lamenting for months the absence of her political acumen to assist a campaign and administration that have suffered repeated public relations setbacks.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Karen Hughes who--shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attack--wrote into President Bush's address to a shaken nation that Americans should "live your lives and hug your children." But when the most powerful woman to have worked in the White House announced recently that she wanted to do just that--live her life, hug her kid more--it set off a cacophony of interpretation and reinterpretation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2001
Re the April 1 profile of Bush advisor Karen Hughes: Assuming it wasn't an April Fool's prank, the article says that a Hughes deputy contends that the only people who might object to Hughes' enormous influence on President Bush would be those who are "ideologically opposed to her message or do not want the messenger to be an intense, smart woman." So that's his conclusion? That to disapprove of professional handlers and spinners and public relations geniuses having disproportionately larger roles in American politics makes one either a sexist or a Democrat?
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Karen Hughes who--shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attack--wrote into President Bush's address to a shaken nation that Americans should "live your lives and hug your children." But when the most powerful woman to have worked in the White House announced recently that she wanted to do just that--live her life, hug her kid more--it set off a cacophony of interpretation and reinterpretation.
BOOKS
January 16, 2000 | ZACHARY KARABELL, Zachary Karabell is the author of the forthcoming "The Last Campaign: How Harry Truman Won the 1948 Election."
It's that time of year. Smiling at you from your local bookstore, wearing the power tie, the dark navy suit, looking rugged but not too rugged, trim, confident, saying to you from that picture on the cover, "Vote for Me." It's election time, and the campaign books are here. The question is why. Why in a television and Internet age do politicians still bother to publish campaign books?
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | GERALDINE BAUM and ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When George W. Bush was preparing to make the most important speech of his young presidency, Karen Hughes took a knife to the work of the White House wordsmiths. Hughes, the ultimate arbiter of this president's public persona, turned the speech to Congress upside-down so that Bush first proposed some new programs--and then got to his controversial tax cuts.
BOOKS
January 16, 2000 | ZACHARY KARABELL, Zachary Karabell is the author of the forthcoming "The Last Campaign: How Harry Truman Won the 1948 Election."
It's that time of year. Smiling at you from your local bookstore, wearing the power tie, the dark navy suit, looking rugged but not too rugged, trim, confident, saying to you from that picture on the cover, "Vote for Me." It's election time, and the campaign books are here. The question is why. Why in a television and Internet age do politicians still bother to publish campaign books?
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