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Karen Stabiner

ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2005 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
My Girl Adventures With a Teen in Training Karen Stabiner Little, Brown: 270 pp., $23.95 * Must raising an adolescent girl necessarily be heartbreaking? This question is at the center of "My Girl," a stirring narrative by journalist Karen Stabiner focusing on her experiences as her daughter Sarah moved into early adolescence.
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BOOKS
September 8, 2002 | CLARA BINGHAM, Clara Bingham is the coauthor, most recently, of "Class Action: The Story of Lois Jenson and the Landmark Case That Changed Sexual Harassment Law." She is a graduate of the Brearley School in New York City.
In the 1990s, a slew of new studies showed that adolescent girls were in crisis. Something strange happened to girls when they reached their teens. They went from having confidence and good grades to becoming silent, self-doubting, subpar students. One of the popular theories at the time was that teachers inadvertently favored boys in the classroom. Some parents responded by sending their daughters to all-girls' schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2007 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
MY oldest child will graduate from high school in a few weeks, and before I know it he'll be packing his bags and heading off to college, scarcely pausing to turn around and wave to those he's leaving behind. Conventional wisdom holds that it's easier to leave than to be left, and no matter how hard I look for comfort in "The Empty Nest," an anthology of writers who've gone through the same experience, I know it's going to be a rocky autumn.
BOOKS
April 13, 1997 | BETSY CARTER, Betsy Carter, a breast cancer survivor, is editor in chief of New Woman magazine
Breast cancer is the devil's toy. It is capricious, ruthless and as of this writing, still out of control. I know this first hand. Nearly five years ago on a perfect June morning, I sat across from a kindly doctor who started lobbing unmentionable words to me. "Tumor." "Chemotherapy." "Mastectomy." "Reconstruction." In seconds, my sunny world went dark and ugly. My husband, whose kindness and quick wit help keep my world bright, slumped in his chair, his jaw slack. There were no words.
MAGAZINE
December 10, 1995
Applause to Dr. Susan Love, Fran Visco, Col. Irene Rich and Dr. Larry Norton for their untiring efforts in aiding the progress of breast cancer research ("The Enemy Within," by Karen Stabiner, Nov. 5). However, we need to also look at the "alternative" healing methods if we are to make any progress against this gruesome disease. After all, as Hippocrates said, "Science is long; life is short." In 1990, my doctor found I had breast and uterine cancer. I chose to use myself as a human experiment to see if I could get well by supporting my immune and healing systems using entirely inexpensive, natural means such as diet, exercise, visualization, meditation and group therapy, methods I describe in "Keep Your Breasts"; Preventing Breast Cancer the Natural Way."
MAGAZINE
October 9, 1988
Since I have never been in the position of wanting to adopt a child, I do not feel qualified to judge or even offer an opinion on the legal services offered in Karen Stabiner's "The Baby Brokers." What troubles me is the search for the "perfect" family, be it adoption or surrogate parenting. What happens to the legal contract if the child turns out not to be perfect--physically handicapped or mentally handicapped--at birth? Are adoptive parents still as eager to make this child a part of their family?
OPINION
July 17, 2002
Re "Spielbergs Keep Brentwood Range Open," July 9: Anyone who visits Sullivan Canyon for the first time has pretty much the same reaction as our friend did when she came down with her daughter last week: "This is amazing," she said. "It's like leaving the city behind." Open space is a scarce commodity in L.A.; we tend to think of it as houses waiting to happen. But Steven Spielberg and Kate Capshaw's donation of the funds needed to purchase Sullivan Canyon guarantees that one of the last public recreation areas on the city's Westside will remain just that--open and available to people who would like to catch their breath without having to leave town.
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