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Karen Ziemba

ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Fans of the snappy, all-singing, all-dancing musical revue that zeros in on a pair of Broadway collaborators have double rewards waiting for them as long as "The World Goes 'Round" at the Henry Fonda Theatre in Hollywood. Overtly, this smart and refreshing little show zooms in on the richness and variety of the music and lyrics of Broadway stalwarts John Kander and Fred Ebb, respectively.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC EMERITUS
If Broadway was waiting for "Crazy for You," the 1991 so-called "new" Gershwin musical, to save it from itself, it was tinkling up the wrong octave. The touring company of the much-awarded "Crazy," which opened Friday at the Century City Shubert, is as old-fashioned and fun-silly a musical as they made in the 1920s, '30s and '40s. Its plot holds as much water as a leaky roof. Its characters are as real as Velveeta.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2003 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
The operative word in "The World Goes 'Round" at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center in Long Beach is "collaborators," in this case John Kander and Fred Ebb. This smooth Musical Theatre West revival of the revue celebrating the songwriters behind "Cabaret" and "Chicago" is a prime example of integrated professionalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Center Theatre Group/Mark Taper Forum has walked away with the lion's share of the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle's 24th annual awards, garnering nine of 30, the critics announced Monday. This includes two awards for outstanding production, won by last year's pair of two-part marathons, "The Kentucky Cycle" and "Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1997 | DON HECKMAN
Ira Gershwin was once asked, "Which comes first, the music or the lyrics?" And he replied, "What comes first is the contract." But the implication in that remark--that the financial deal was more important than the work--never seemed to impact the writing of a man who was arguably one of the finest song lyricists in a generation of superb wordsmiths. "Ira Gershwin at 100: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall" on PBS' "Great Performances"--which was recorded on Gershwin's 100th birthday last Dec.
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | Ann Conway
She was crazy for him, but Polly (Karen Ziemba) sure gave Bobby (James Brennan) a couple of mean whacks during the second act of "Crazy for You" at the Orange County Performing Arts Center on Tuesday night. The production won last year's Tony for best musical. "It was all stage fighting, of course," Ziemba whispered as she swept into Birraporetti's in Costa Mesa for a post opening-night bash with center board members and donors. "But sometimes I miss and really do slap him.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2008 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
As the early excitement of romance dwindles into the dull yet demanding routine of family life, a husband and wife try to buck up their spirits by reminding themselves, "Love is what makes it sort of fun." "Sort of." Those two little words indicate so much: a dash of feistiness yet a troublesome tendency toward wishy-washiness. Such contrary impulses are typical of the 1966 musical "I Do! I Do!"
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, Zan Dubin covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
Man and woman, dancing as one, swirling, gliding, dipping. Intoxicating. That's the stuff Susan Stroman likes the best in "Crazy for You," the Broadway hit she choreographed. "After all is said and done," Stroman said in a recent phone interview from her New York City home, "after the big tap numbers and the big acrobatic numbers, when a man and a woman dance close together . . . it gives me the chills. There's nothing more romantic than singing and dancing about being in love."
NEWS
September 13, 1998 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Dying to Tell the Story" / 6 p.m. TBS Photographers in war zones will say they "must be close to what's happening" and that they can't "hide behind the camera" in order to do their best work. It's a case of seeing humanity at its extremes. Being perfectly blunt, another remarks, "We're licensed idiots who go out and stand in the line of fire."
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