Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKarl Linnas
IN THE NEWS

Karl Linnas

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987
Rather than simply being executed, Karl Linnas may be tortured by the Soviets. Those six Supreme Court justices are responsible for sending a man to a Soviet torture chamber. MIKE MADRID Lomita
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Karl Linnas, who was convicted in absentia as a war criminal and brought back to the Soviet Union to face the death penalty, died Thursday in a Leningrad hospital, according to Tass, the official Soviet news agency. Linnas, 67, lived for more than 35 years in the United States, then was stripped of his U.S. citizenship and deported last April to Tallinn, Estonia, where he was imprisoned pending review of his sentence.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 8, 1987 | From Reuters
Karl Linnas, a convicted Nazi war criminal deported to the Soviet Union from the United States, was unrepentant and rude when a prosecutor questioned him about his wartime activities, Izvestia said Sunday. The government daily published details of a prison interview between the public prosecutor in the Baltic republic of Estonia and Linnas, a World War II death camp commandant in the Estonian city of Tartu.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Six weeks after the United States deported Karl Linnas to the Soviet Union to face execution as an accused Nazi war criminal, letters that Linnas and his wife wrote in 1947 to an American friend from a refugee camp in Germany have come to light, portraying him as an ardent anti-Communist with no sympathy for the Nazis.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Karl Linnas, the wartime commandant of a German concentration camp in Estonia, has reportedly asked a Soviet court to pardon him from a death sentence imposed after his 1962 conviction, in absentia, as a war criminal. Tass, the Soviet news agency, said Wednesday that Linnas, in requesting the pardon, argued that more than 40 years have passed since the alleged offenses took place. He was convicted of ordering mass executions at the concentration camp, located at Tartu.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Three survivors of a Nazi concentration camp commanded by Karl Linnas believe that he should be spared the death sentence imposed on him by a Soviet court in 1962. But they agreed that Linnas, deported from the United States and turned over to Soviet authorities last month, should spend the rest of his life in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987
Thousands of World War II Hitler collaborators and their descendants will be rejoicing because only one has been chosen to be deported. These so-called "displaced persons" and "freedom fighters" have one more reason to be laughing. They have succeeded far beyond their numbers in transforming our wartime alliance with he Soviet Union into a state of explosive hatred. Our nuclear stockpile gives them hope that the day will come when Hitler's defeat on the Eastern front can be avenged.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|