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Kashmir India

NEWS
November 1, 2001 | Associated Press
The commander of Indian troops in disputed Kashmir warned Wednesday that if pushed, New Delhi could choose military action against Pakistan's army and Islamic guerrillas. In the most aggressive comments in years by a military commander, Lt. Gen. R.K. Nanavatty said that India "must remain prepared to exercise the military action" and that the capture of Pakistan-controlled Kashmir was "achievable."
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WORLD
November 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistan offered to impose a cease-fire along the military Line of Control in the disputed region of Kashmir, and India promised to reply today. Pakistani Prime Minister Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali said in a televised address that he hoped India, a rival that like Pakistan possesses nuclear arms, would respond positively. Each week several people are killed or wounded on both sides of the Line of Control by exchanges of artillery and mortar fire between soldiers of Pakistan and India.
WORLD
October 19, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Fifteen people, most of them Muslim rebels, have been killed in separatist violence in India's Jammu and Kashmir state, police said Friday. They said security forces killed three suspected Islamic militants as they tried to slip into the Indian-controlled portion of Kashmir from Pakistan early Friday.
WORLD
July 23, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A top Kashmiri militant commander blamed for dozens of attacks and tourist killings has been arrested in the Indian-controlled portion of the contested Himalayan state, dealing a major setback for the separatist rebels, police said Saturday. Mudassir, who goes by a single name, is believed to be the chief planner of Lashkar-e- Taiba, an Islamic militant group based in Pakistan.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
A pro-Pakistani militant group in Kashmir on Monday declared a cease-fire for three months, saying it was ready to hold peace talks with the Indian government. Abdul Majid Dar, chief commander of the Hizbul Moujahedeen group, gave the Indian government one week to end what he called a crackdown on militants in Kashmir.
NEWS
October 24, 2001 | Reuters
Eleven people were killed in separatist violence in the Kashmir region, police said Tuesday, as militant violence continued to flare amid the U.S. strikes on Afghanistan. The violence came as security was increased around Jammu and Kashmir state's airports after rebels tried to storm a key military airfield Monday. Six people were killed in the attack. Police said eight civilians were wounded Tuesday morning when a bomb went off at a village in the Poonch district.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
Gunmen killed 36 Sikhs in India's northern state of Jammu and Kashmir late Monday, even as President Clinton was beginning a visit to the Asian nation, police said. It was the first major attack on the Sikhs since a Muslim insurgency began 10 years ago in Kashmir. Both India and Pakistan claim the Himalayan territory and have fought two wars over it.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Muslim separatists freed the daughter of a Cabinet minister Wednesday after the government released five of their jailed comrades, officials said. Rubaiya Sayeed, daughter of Home Minister Mufti Mohammed Sayeed, was taken to a friend's home in this northern city two hours after the militants were freed downtown, police said. Rubaiya Sayeed, 22, was flown to New Delhi later and met at the airport by her father, mother, brother and sister.
WORLD
June 17, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Twenty-one people, including five Hindu villagers, were killed on Sunday in several incidents of separatist violence in Indian Kashmir, police said. The violence comes despite U.S.-led international efforts to pull nuclear-armed rivals India and Pakistan back from the brink of a fourth war. Police said suspected Muslim rebels shot dead five Hindu villagers in the Himalayan region's Udhampur district on Sunday. Security forces rushed to the village.
WORLD
September 6, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
After eight months of slow progress toward lasting peace, foreign ministers from India and Pakistan met Sunday to search for solutions to their main dispute, the 57-year conflict over the divided territory of Kashmir. Spokesmen for Indian Foreign Minister K. Natwar Singh and his Pakistani counterpart Mian Khursheed Mehmood Kasuri said talks on the first day of the two-day summit went well, but gave no details.
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