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Kate Braverman

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October 20, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
She's a best-selling novelist. And, according to her, she is "the most famous female poet in Los Angeles." But Kate Braverman's life as a writer has not been easy. In a Times interview last year, her mother remembered Braverman telling a group of UCLA writing students: "The pain you suffer is enormous. If you can be anything else but a writer, be it." You'd better want to "spend 10 years like I did in a bathrobe because that's what it takes."
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MAGAZINE
May 7, 2006
I loved reading Kate Braverman's short fiction piece ("Science of Navigation," California Story, April 16). There's no one writing today quite like her. And no one describes Southern California characters as she does. Except maybe Susan Straight ("Makes, Models and Memories," April 16), and you featured stories by both of them. I'm in literary heaven. Paul Alan Fahey Nipomo, Calif.
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BOOKS
October 14, 1990 | MICHAEL HARRIS
The women in Kate Braverman's first collection of short stories seem to have stepped from the works of Joan Didion into another color scheme. The "hard white empty core of the world" in "Play It as It Lays" has given way to the green of money, the red of tropical flowers and sunsets, and, above all, blue. Blue is the sea and the sky and the swimming pools of Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2006
RE "L.A.'s Unsung Prophet," by Anne-Marie O'Connor, Feb. 24: Why do I get the nagging sense that O'Connor has never even used one of Kate Braverman's incredible literary works as a doorstop? Although focusing on this author's darker biographical facets is a common enough approach to dismissing women of brilliance, I had hoped for more from The Times' staff. How about a serious exploration of the way in which Braverman's poetic insights have reimpassioned California literature? Or something about what it means to refuse to "dumb down" one's artistic works given the marketplace excretions we must wade through?
BOOKS
March 7, 1993 | Paul Gervais, Gervais is the author of "Extraordinary People," a finalist for the 1991 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction
In 1857, when Charles Baudelaire first published "Les Fleurs du Mal," the masterwork so effectively alluded to in Kate Braverman's new novel, "Wonders of the West," its dark, poetic voice found resonance against the contrasting background of Romanticism.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | PAUL CIOTTI, Times Staff Writer
Kate Braverman, poet, mother, neo-mythic persona and author of a new novel, "Palm Latitudes," is sitting on the snack bar deck of the Miramar Hotel in Montecito, Calif., on a cool, foggy afternoon drinking coffee from a foam cup and accepting homage from writing students who have just heard her read at the annual writers' conference. "What's your sun sign?" asks one student, telling Braverman she is collecting the sun signs of famous writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
A popular proverb in Spanish says, "You cannot be a prophet in your own land." And that's how quintessential Los Angeles writer Kate Braverman feels today, as she asks aloud why she isn't more famous in her hometown. After all, her 1979 fever dream of a novel, "Lithium for Medea," hailed as a classic L.A. crack-up novel about a junkie living on a Venice canal, was written, Braverman says, while she was a cocaine addict.
MAGAZINE
August 13, 1989
Kudos to you for devoting an entire issue to new California prose. The mix was excellent. The magazine should now give equal time to the poetry of our region. Certainly this would include more of author Kate Braverman ("Falling in October"), but let us have a summer reader representing the best of eclectic Los Angeles to round out the sampling of the major new voices of Californian writers. CARA MICHAELSON Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
May 7, 2006
I loved reading Kate Braverman's short fiction piece ("Science of Navigation," California Story, April 16). There's no one writing today quite like her. And no one describes Southern California characters as she does. Except maybe Susan Straight ("Makes, Models and Memories," April 16), and you featured stories by both of them. I'm in literary heaven. Paul Alan Fahey Nipomo, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
A popular proverb in Spanish says, "You cannot be a prophet in your own land." And that's how quintessential Los Angeles writer Kate Braverman feels today, as she asks aloud why she isn't more famous in her hometown. After all, her 1979 fever dream of a novel, "Lithium for Medea," hailed as a classic L.A. crack-up novel about a junkie living on a Venice canal, was written, Braverman says, while she was a cocaine addict.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2006 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Frantic Transmissions to and From Los Angeles An Accidental Memoir Kate Braverman Graywolf Press: 222 pp., $15 paper * IN an interview appended to the Seven Stories Press Reading Group Edition of her 1988 novel, "Palm Latitudes," Kate Braverman delivers a trenchant and revealing statement about poetry: "Poetry is my natural state....
BOOKS
April 7, 2002 | YXTA MAYA MURRAY, Yxta Maya Murray is the author of "Locas," "What It Takes to Get to Vegas" and the forthcoming novel "The Conquest." She is a professor at Loyola Law School.
Mexican painter Frida Kahlo took the messy, wonderful and sometimes horrible stuff that is a woman's life and transformed it into likenesses that are as bracing as ice on a burn. Her self-portraits, painted in the 1930s and 1940s, reveal a hirsute red-lipped woman whose dark and staring eyes accuse the observer of crimes--indifference, complacency and worse. The portraits (and a large portion of her oeuvre was an obsessive excavation of her own image) are hallucinatory and disorienting.
BOOKS
September 13, 1998 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, Susan Salter Reynolds is an assistant editor of Book Review
SMALL CRAFT WARNINGS. By Kate Braverman (University of Nevada Press: 180 pp., $16) Precarious, these stories are. There is no sense of destiny in the characters Kate Braverman creates and destroys for us. They put one foot in front of the other and hope that the future is waiting for them--the textbook definition of a Southern Californian. Here, for example, is the image of a young mother who "never wanted this baby," walking each Sunday over a rickety bridge carrying the infant.
MAGAZINE
January 26, 1997
Oh, yes, yes, YES! How right Kate Braverman is when she describes her affection for "her" mall ("What I Miss: The Beverly Center," Dec. 8). For I, too, have "my" mall, one I know so intimately that I conduct "tours" of it for my non-shopping friends. And she is right about sale days, about how one's blood rushes upon receiving a sale flier, about the thrill of the hunt, the capture of a bargain and the display of a trophy to bargain-loving friends. Or, conversely, the "visits" to a desired item, hoping, hoping that it will still be there when one comes back to buy it on sale.
MAGAZINE
January 26, 1997
Oh, yes, yes, YES! How right Kate Braverman is when she describes her affection for "her" mall ("What I Miss: The Beverly Center," Dec. 8). For I, too, have "my" mall, one I know so intimately that I conduct "tours" of it for my non-shopping friends. And she is right about sale days, about how one's blood rushes upon receiving a sale flier, about the thrill of the hunt, the capture of a bargain and the display of a trophy to bargain-loving friends. Or, conversely, the "visits" to a desired item, hoping, hoping that it will still be there when one comes back to buy it on sale.
BOOKS
April 4, 1993
Paul Gervais' review of Kate Braverman's latest book ("Wonders of the West," March 7) verges on obsequious drivel. Gervais praises Braverman because "she made this book as tough as she felt she had to, taking the risk of exposing, courageously, the true character of life's underbelly, which so many of us (leave me out of it, please) are afraid to face and thereby accept." I don't see the risk involved. We all know that shock sells. I also fail to see the value of "accepting" these distortions.
MAGAZINE
April 14, 1996
Too bad Kate Braverman had to leave town to find a meaningful lifestyle ("A Tale of Two Very Different, You Know, Spaces," March 3). Her article kindled the I-should-leave-L.A. feelings so many of us have. But it isn't Los Angeles that causes a chill within families or creates the obsessions we have with famous people we don't know. True, we have a high-decibel media, but still, no one forces you to listen. I think Braverman's I'm-happy-now story goes to show that it's really how you spend your time that counts, not where you spend it. Glen Janken Los Angeles As a mother of four, I live with my husband and children in a three-bedroom house.
NEWS
February 9, 1995
My wholehearted support goes to Prof. Timothy Steele of Cal State Los Angeles ("To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme--That Is the Poet's Question," Jan. 19). If it doesn't employ meter, rhyme and form, you can be sure it isn't poetry. Those creatures who scrawl disjointed, dissociated words in fragmented lines on a page should come up with another name for their output. TROXEY KEMPER Los Angeles A poem works Or it doesn't For the poet And the reader Whether it's free Verse stream of consciousness or iambic Pentameter Delivered by quatrains, couplets or the Bloody feet Of a beautiful ballerina Or a pipe bomb That explodes Flinging pieces of brain and sounds We're surprised to find Are words.
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