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Kate Harrington

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NEWS
July 30, 1999 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES FASHION WRITER
Kate Harrington checks her purse, the bed, a suitcase, under a magazine, the top of a coffee table. Finally, she surveys a corner desk in her room at the Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills. Out of luck, she phones downstairs. Could someone kindly buy her a pack of cigarettes? Within minutes, her request is delivered. Such is the way of the world these days. Need something? Send someone to shop for it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"The Thomas Crown Affair" plays by the rules. A moderately diverting entertainment as sleek and aerodynamically sound as the glider its characters tool around in, it takes no extraordinary chances and delivers no major surprises. With one exception. For though Pierce Brosnan, whose production company initiated the idea of remaking the 1968 Steve McQueen-Faye Dunaway caper film with an eye toward his eventual starring role, it's Rene Russo, his opposite number, who makes the most of this chance.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | MAUREEN SAJBEL
A glance at a few new videos gives some good pointers for summer style. Shorter hair and lots of silver crosses are among the leading looks for guys. Major "dos" to wear with cut-offs are a new twist for girls. David Bowie, Jon Bon Jovi and Jade, the all-girl group, are some names influencing the new styles. Shiny Suits: David Bowie jumps off a building in his video, "Jump They Say," but he sure looks good doing it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
If any of your talkative friends get to "Basic" before you do, don't worry about them giving the plot away. They won't be able to. For though it's made with reasonable efficiency, this John Travolta-starring military thriller about murky doings in the jungles of Panama is so unashamedly confusing, so intent on piling twist upon twist upon twist, it makes your head hurt just trying to figure out what's happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To watch the new "Rollerball" is to understand why John McTiernan would be tempted to rework the 1975 Norman Jewison original. The earlier film was set in a future in which an ultra-violent sport served as an outlet for a world in which other violence had been banned. Since the day of extreme sports has arrived--in a world more violent than ever--there was no need to set it in the future.
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