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Kate Hutton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989
The good thing about earthquakes is the following TV interview with Caltech seismologist Kate Hutton. Straightforward comment, a sparkle in her eyes behind big-rimmed glasses, and nonchalance about hair and dress styles make Kate my favorite TV personality. She's no rubber stamp--she's Kate Hutton! How refreshing! PAT GREUTERT Pasadena
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NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Well, what do you know, we had a quake, and we had a warning too. As my colleague Joseph Serna reported Wednesday:  An earthquake early warning system being tested in California gave seismologists in Pasadena up to 30 seconds to prepare for Monday morning's temblor in the desert of Riverside County. “It was right,” said Kate Hutton, a seismologist with Caltech. “I sat really still to see if I could feel it and it worked.” Hopefully, Hutton was saying that without surprise in her voice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
This week's predawn earthquake in Pico Rivera woke up people around Southern California, but the magnitude 4.4 temblor didn't cause major damage. But scientists said the quake should serve as a warning about a fault that runs through a large swath of densely populated Los Angeles County and is capable of producing a devastating, magnitude 7.5 quake. The Puente Hills thrust fault is less well-known than other faults such as the San Andreas and Newport-Inglewood. But there is growing scientific evidence that it is particularly dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Some called it an "earthquake cluster," others a "swarm. " Seismologists used the term "earthquake sequence. " Whatever the name, a series of more than 30 small to moderate temblors jolted Southern California on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning, rattling nerves but causing no significant damage. The cluster of earthquakes that struck near Yorba Linda was centered near the Whittier fault, but preliminary data suggested that fault was not responsible for the temblor, said Doug Given, a geophysicist with theU.S.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | Associated Press
A 4.0 earthquake rattled the desert east of Ensenada, Mexico, Saturday morning, according to Caltech in Pasadena. The 8:17 a.m. earthquake was centered 49 miles east of the port city in Baja California, said seismologist Kate Hutton of Caltech. The quake was felt in the San Diego-Tijuana region about 100 miles north of Ensenada. There were no reports of damage.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Well, what do you know, we had a quake, and we had a warning too. As my colleague Joseph Serna reported Wednesday:  An earthquake early warning system being tested in California gave seismologists in Pasadena up to 30 seconds to prepare for Monday morning's temblor in the desert of Riverside County. “It was right,” said Kate Hutton, a seismologist with Caltech. “I sat really still to see if I could feel it and it worked.” Hopefully, Hutton was saying that without surprise in her voice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | STEVE HARVEY, From staff and wire reports
Some tourists waiting in line for "Earthquake: The Big One" on the Universal Studios Tour Monday morning no doubt wondered if the ride had begun ahead of schedule. In fact, spokeswoman Joan Bullard said, some visitors suspected "we were pulling some kind of stunt on them" when the real-life 4.5-magnitude quake and 4.3 aftershock struck. As for those inside the subway station set, where a simulated 8.3 temblor hits every few minutes, "They didn't feel anything." Why not?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Some called it an "earthquake cluster," others a "swarm. " Seismologists used the term "earthquake sequence. " Whatever the name, a series of more than 30 small to moderate temblors jolted Southern California on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning, rattling nerves but causing no significant damage. The cluster of earthquakes that struck near Yorba Linda was centered near the Whittier fault, but preliminary data suggested that fault was not responsible for the temblor, said Doug Given, a geophysicist with theU.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2010 | By Ruben Vives and Rong-Gong Lin II
A predawn earthquake sent a sharp jolt across the Los Angeles area Tuesday, but the magnitude 4.4 temblor was barely strong enough to knock items off shelves. It was, however, sharp enough to frazzle residents, many of whom felt a "strong bang." The epicenter was 10 miles southeast of downtown Los Angeles in Pico Rivera, and the quake was felt as far away as San Diego and Ventura County. Los Angeles County fire official Ed Pickett, who was in East Los Angeles, said the jolt at 4:04 a.m. felt "like the building dropped."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This is probably the only place on Earth where residents actually know the names of their favorite seismologists. Every time the ground rumbles and shakes, Southern Californians soon find the familiar faces of Dr. Kate Hutton and Dr. Lucile Jones on their TV screens. "The seismo heads," as one local journalist affectionately dubbed them. "The earthquake ladies," as they are known to fans who point and wave at them on the street as if they were Goldie Hawn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
This week's predawn earthquake in Pico Rivera woke up people around Southern California, but the magnitude 4.4 temblor didn't cause major damage. But scientists said the quake should serve as a warning about a fault that runs through a large swath of densely populated Los Angeles County and is capable of producing a devastating, magnitude 7.5 quake. The Puente Hills thrust fault is less well-known than other faults such as the San Andreas and Newport-Inglewood. But there is growing scientific evidence that it is particularly dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2010 | By Ruben Vives and Rong-Gong Lin II
A predawn earthquake sent a sharp jolt across the Los Angeles area Tuesday, but the magnitude 4.4 temblor was barely strong enough to knock items off shelves. It was, however, sharp enough to frazzle residents, many of whom felt a "strong bang." The epicenter was 10 miles southeast of downtown Los Angeles in Pico Rivera, and the quake was felt as far away as San Diego and Ventura County. Los Angeles County fire official Ed Pickett, who was in East Los Angeles, said the jolt at 4:04 a.m. felt "like the building dropped."
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | Associated Press
A 4.0 earthquake rattled the desert east of Ensenada, Mexico, Saturday morning, according to Caltech in Pasadena. The 8:17 a.m. earthquake was centered 49 miles east of the port city in Baja California, said seismologist Kate Hutton of Caltech. The quake was felt in the San Diego-Tijuana region about 100 miles north of Ensenada. There were no reports of damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1995 | PATT MORRISON
Beyond any contest, they prove what no politician or economist, no billion-dollar freeway network or water system has been able to: that the San Fernando Valley is indeed linked body and soul to Santa Monica, that what happens in Whittier reaches from the foothills to the harbor. Earthquake faults? Oh sure, those too. But I also mean those counterforces of nature, Pasadena's Earthquake Ladies, the Seismo-Moms, Dr. Kate and Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This is probably the only place on Earth where residents actually know the names of their favorite seismologists. Every time the ground rumbles and shakes, Southern Californians soon find the familiar faces of Dr. Kate Hutton and Dr. Lucile Jones on their TV screens. "The seismo heads," as one local journalist affectionately dubbed them. "The earthquake ladies," as they are known to fans who point and wave at them on the street as if they were Goldie Hawn.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Finding Lucile Jones on Sunday was a cinch. I circled Caltech until I spotted news vans parked outside a campus building. Black cords stretched from the vans to a second floor window. Upstairs, the cords connected to a row of cameras, and before this electronic firing line sat a woman in black slacks and red top, patiently fielding questions. Details varied, but the questions all boiled down to this: What now? "My guess," the woman was saying as I arrived, "is that we will have another six."
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Finding Lucile Jones on Sunday was a cinch. I circled Caltech until I spotted news vans parked outside a campus building. Black cords stretched from the vans to a second floor window. Upstairs, the cords connected to a row of cameras, and before this electronic firing line sat a woman in black slacks and red top, patiently fielding questions. Details varied, but the questions all boiled down to this: What now? "My guess," the woman was saying as I arrived, "is that we will have another six."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1995 | PATT MORRISON
Beyond any contest, they prove what no politician or economist, no billion-dollar freeway network or water system has been able to: that the San Fernando Valley is indeed linked body and soul to Santa Monica, that what happens in Whittier reaches from the foothills to the harbor. Earthquake faults? Oh sure, those too. But I also mean those counterforces of nature, Pasadena's Earthquake Ladies, the Seismo-Moms, Dr. Kate and Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989
The good thing about earthquakes is the following TV interview with Caltech seismologist Kate Hutton. Straightforward comment, a sparkle in her eyes behind big-rimmed glasses, and nonchalance about hair and dress styles make Kate my favorite TV personality. She's no rubber stamp--she's Kate Hutton! How refreshing! PAT GREUTERT Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | STEVE HARVEY, From staff and wire reports
Some tourists waiting in line for "Earthquake: The Big One" on the Universal Studios Tour Monday morning no doubt wondered if the ride had begun ahead of schedule. In fact, spokeswoman Joan Bullard said, some visitors suspected "we were pulling some kind of stunt on them" when the real-life 4.5-magnitude quake and 4.3 aftershock struck. As for those inside the subway station set, where a simulated 8.3 temblor hits every few minutes, "They didn't feel anything." Why not?
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