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Kate Hutton

NEWS
October 4, 1987 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The electronic alarm that alerts Caltech seismologists to a major earthquake broke down with the first jolt at 7:42 Thursday morning. "It didn't work for the main show!" said senior seismologist Kate Hutton, who heads the list of scientists to be notified of earthquakes over Magnitude 4 on the Richter scale. Thursday's quake was 100 times stronger than that--6.0 on the scale, where an increase of one magnitude represents 10 times as much ground motion recorded on seismographs.
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NEWS
October 11, 1987 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
With lights, cameras and microphones all aimed at her face, the media's fleeting new star pulled off another perfect performance, answering everything everyone wanted to know about earthquakes. This time, Kate Hutton, spokeswoman for Caltech's seismology laboratory, was speaking for television audiences in Japan. Hutton's face and words became familiar to American readers and television viewers when she explained the Southland's Oct.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Was that an earthquake, or an ordinary sonic boom, that rattled Southern California on Wednesday afternoon - or was it the return of Aurora, the nation's long-rumored, never-confirmed, some-say-mythological super-secret, super-fast spy plane? Whew. Steady now, X-Files folks. First, here's what The Times reported : About 1 p.m. Wednesday, folks from Malibu to Orange County felt what many assumed was an earthquake. For example, Scott Conner, who lives in Malibu, said the shaking was so intense that it almost toppled one of his computer monitors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A magnitude 4.4 earthquake struck six miles southeast of Mt. San Gorgonio early Tuesday, less than four hours after a 4.1 foreshock hit in the same area. Palm Springs police said they took no calls reporting damage in the area. Several aftershocks, including a magnitude 2.8 temblor, followed the 4.4 quake that struck at 12:31 a.m., said Caltech seismologist Kate Hutton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1991
One of the most functional things about earthquakes is that virtually everyone looks to women for the answers. Despite cliched and questionably enlightened references by the media to the wrath of Mother Nature, Kate Hutton of Caltech and Lucile Jones of the U.S. Geological Survey repeatedly demonstrate insight, confident presence of mind, enthusiasm and humor that make the shaking a lot more tolerable. In fact, they almost make it worth it. DOUGLAS SAXON Los Angeles
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | Associated Press
Aftershocks rumbled through a remote area near the California-Nevada border Wednesday, two days after a magnitude 6.0 earthquake in the region. No injuries or damage were reported. The largest aftershock, magnitude 5.1, struck at 7:13 a.m. about 36 miles south-southeast of Bishop, said Heather Lovasz, a spokeswoman for Caltech in Pasadena. The temblor was the largest of more than 200 aftershocks from Monday's quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Dozens of small earthquakes up to magnitude 4.5 shook the Imperial County desert Wednesday afternoon, but there were no reports of damage. Kate Hutton, a staff seismologist at Caltech in Pasadena, called the event "a very typical Imperial Valley swarm." She said the temblors occurred in the Brawley seismic zone, which runs from the San Andreas Fault on the north to the Imperial Fault on the south. Hutton said additional small quakes could be expected for the next day or two.
NEWS
August 21, 1998
A magnitude 4.4 earthquake centered in the San Gabriel Mountains two miles northwest of Wrightwood was felt widely in urban Southern California at 4:49 p.m. Thursday, Caltech seismologists said. There were no reports of damage or injuries. Kate Hutton of Caltech said the quake occurred on or very close to the San Andreas fault and was centered about six miles below the Earth's surface. The area at the epicenter is sparsely populated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1988
A mild earthquake with a magnitude of 3.1 struck near the Malibu coastline Monday, but there were no reports of damage or injuries. Robert Finn, a spokesman for the Caltech Seismology Laboratory in Pasadena, said the 11:11 a.m. quake was centered in the ocean about 6 miles from Malibu, was not an aftershock of the 5.0 shaker that hit early Saturday in Pasadena, which resulted in 32 injuries and was felt as far away as Palm Springs and San Diego.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | Associated Press
A swarm of moderate aftershocks from last week's Hector Mine earthquake, including two that reached magnitude 5.1, shook the Mojave Desert on Wednesday evening. There were no reports of damage or injury in the sparsely populated area 150 miles northeast of Los Angeles. The 35-minute flurry of seismic activity began at 6:25 p.m. with a 4.3-magnitude temblor that was centered about 30 miles from Baker, said Kate Hutton, a Caltech seismologist. It was followed within half an hour by a 4.
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