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Kate Smith

NEWS
September 18, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Jay Stewart, announcer of the television game show "Let's Make a Deal," died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound outside the garage at his home in Hollywood, police said. He was 71. Officers were called to the home about 4 p.m. Sunday after neighbors and relatives reported hearing a gunshot, detective Russell Kuster said. "There was a last will and testament on his person, and some sort of a suicide note, but I can't give that to you," Kuster said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2008 | Ruben Vives
A man found dead on a South Los Angeles street early Sunday had been shot, the L.A. County coroner's office said Monday. Police initially reported that the man had been beaten to death. The man, whose name and age were not released pending notification of next of kin, died from gunshot wounds to the head and neck, said Lt. John Kades of the Los Angeles County coroner's office. The man was found lying in the street in the 1700 block of East 22nd Street, near Alameda Street, Kades said.
NEWS
May 1, 1997
John Beal, 87, an actor whose career spanned six decades in movies and television and on the stage. He began in Hollywood in the 1933 film "Another Language" with Helen Hayes and Robert Montgomery. A year later he played opposite Katharine Hepburn in the romantic film "The Little Minister." Beal was a student revolutionary in the original film of Victor Hugo's "Les Miserables," starring Fredric March and Charles Laughton in 1935.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Holloway Tobin, whose writing career cut across three of the four major entertainment fields, has died, her longtime aide said Wednesday. Rebecca Gourlie said Mrs. Tobin, widow of character actor Dan Tobin, was 72 and died Saturday in Santa Monica after a stroke. As Jean Holloway she was a youthful and later frequent contributor to radio, beginning with "The Kate Smith Show" in the late 1930s. She got to network radio from then-San Jose State College after winning a poetry contest.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andre Baruch, whose long radio career ranged from broadcasting Brooklyn Dodgers baseball games to announcing "Your Hit Parade," died Sunday at his home in Beverly Hills. His son, Wayne Baruch, said Monday that the Parisian-born airwaves pioneer was 83 and died of the complications of old age.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last few years, the Barnes & Noble Catalogue has become the discerning couch potato's best friend. Though most video stores and catalogues offer collections of classic TV series, Barnes & Noble is one of the best and most economical sources for TV videos that feature offbeat and often obscure series, shows and specials from the Golden Age of Television. Abbott & Costello fans may want to check out a three-volume set ($10 each) culled from four live TV performances from the early '50s.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | ANN CONNORS
One man said it took away his "pain and sorrow." Another viewer called it "godly-like." Others said it is simply a reflection and one dismissed it as a trick of the light. Whatever it is, thousands have flocked to see what they say is a shining silver cross visible through an opaque window in the front door of the Wynne, Ark., home of Darlene Andrews. Andrews says the cross became visible a few hours after her husband, Jerry, died Oct. 17.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1989 | IRV LETOFSKY
If you bought Jaclyn Smith as an undercover investigator, Florence Nightingale, Jackie Kennedy and Martha Washington, you'll buy her as a frigid Arkansas farm girl who becomes a Chicago cop. In "Settle the Score" (airing at 9 tonight on Channels 4, 36 and 39), she goes back to her Ozark home to find the man who raped her 20 years earlier. Executive producer-writer Steve Sohmer has an interesting little mystery for a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1995
When a review of an American Independence Day Concert at the Hollywood Bowl ("Amber Waves Are Plain at the Bowl," Calendar, July 4) begins with a quote from Samuel Johnson that "patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel," it is clear that an attempt is being made by another writer to sneer at good, clean American fun. What a pity that Timothy Mangan, although he admits that "we had fun," felt compelled to try to out-Bernheimer Bernheimer....
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