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Kathleen Q Abernathy

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BUSINESS
April 7, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush nominated two Republicans on Friday to fill vacancies on the Federal Communications Commission, giving newly appointed FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell strong political allies in his pursuit to streamline the agency and deregulate the communications industry. Bush said he planned to appoint Kevin J. Martin, currently special assistant to the president for economic policy, and Kathleen Q.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 2005 | From Reuters
Kathleen Abernathy, a Republican commissioner at the Federal Communications Commission, said Thursday that she planned to leave the agency Dec. 9. The Bush administration has yet to name Abernathy's successor at the five-member agency, which regulates the communications and media industries. The FCC is typically split 3 to 2 in favor of the political party occupying the White House.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 2005 | From Reuters
Kathleen Abernathy, a Republican commissioner at the Federal Communications Commission, said Thursday that she planned to leave the agency Dec. 9. The Bush administration has yet to name Abernathy's successor at the five-member agency, which regulates the communications and media industries. The FCC is typically split 3 to 2 in favor of the political party occupying the White House.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush nominated two Republicans on Friday to fill vacancies on the Federal Communications Commission, giving newly appointed FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell strong political allies in his pursuit to streamline the agency and deregulate the communications industry. Bush said he planned to appoint Kevin J. Martin, currently special assistant to the president for economic policy, and Kathleen Q.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2005 | From Reuters
U.S. regulators Thursday took action to accelerate the transition to digital television by moving up the date by which all new mid-sized TV sets must be able to view the high-quality signals. The Federal Communications Commission unanimously voted to move up by four months, to March 1, 2006, a deadline requiring digital reception by all television sets sold in the United States with 25-inch to 35-inch screens. The Consumer Electronics Assn. had asked for the new deadline.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
President Bush is likely to nominate a White House technology advisor and a Tennessee utility regulator for two slots on the Federal Communications Commission, an industry analyst said Friday. Richard Russell, associate director of the president's Office of Science and Technology Policy since 2002, and Deborah Taylor Tate, a director of the Tennessee Regulatory Authority, would fill two Republican seats on the commission, Legg Mason analyst Blair Levin wrote to clients.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Wednesday nominated Tennessee utility regulator Deborah Taylor Tate to fill a long vacant Republican seat on the Federal Communications Commission, while at the same time naming Michael J. Copps to retain his Democratic seat at the agency. If confirmed by the Senate, Tate and Copps would restore a 3-2 Republican majority at the FCC, clearing the way for agency Chairman Kevin J.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to reject a request by television broadcasters such as ABC to force cable companies including Comcast Corp. to show both digital and analog versions of network programs, FCC lawyers familiar with the matter said. Broadcasters want shows such as ABC's "Monday Night Football" to be carried on cable both in the current analog format and in digital form to expand their audience to viewers with new high-definition televisions.
OPINION
March 2, 2002
As any insomniac who has listened to a TV station's early morning sign-off knows, broadcasters are licensed by the Federal Communications Commission to operate "in the public interest.'' Not that you'd know that by watching the programming. A study released last week by the Kaiser Family Foundation found broadcasters retreating from commitments to public service that they made just before Congress handed them a set of regulatory breaks in the mid-1990s.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
In the face of a growing political divide over media ownership, the Federal Communications Commission on Monday voted 3 to 2 along partisan lines to allow Univision Communications Inc.'s $3.25-billion acquisition of radio chain Hispanic Broadcasting Corp. Although approval of the deal had been expected for months, the decision highlighted the increasing rancor over an issue that has roiled Congress, the courts and the commission itself.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Departing Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael K. Powell bid farewell Thursday to the agency he led through a thicket of controversies amid signs the White House has narrowed to two the contenders for his job. Bush administration officials are considering as early as next week nominating either current Republican FCC Commissioner Kevin J. Martin or Michael D. Gallagher, assistant secretary for telecommunications in the Commerce Department, according to FCC and industry sources.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2002 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of a court ruling that undermined federal ownership restrictions in the cable and broadcast TV industry, the head of the Federal Communications Commission conceded Wednesday that it would be harder for the agency to justify its rules. A federal appeals court in Washington on Tuesday ordered the FCC to reconsider restrictions that no single company can reach more than 35% of the national broadcast television audience.
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