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Kathleen Quinlan

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1997 | Steve Hochman
First Kathleen Quinlan gets a supporting actress Oscar nomination as the wife of a space-stranded astronaut in "Apollo 13." Now, she and Kurt Russell co-star in "Breakdown" as desert-stranded motorists. But around the Malibu Hills home she shares with husband Bruce Abbot and two sons, Quinlan, 42, is so handy you figure that with proper tools she could have taken care of either predicament. HOMEBODY: "I just finished working for four months in London on 'Event Horizon,' a science-fiction film.
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NEWS
April 26, 1998 | Jack Matthews
It's so simple, it ought to be banal. A couple (Kurt Russell, pictured, Kathleen Quinlan) on a cross-country drive from New England to Southern California are stranded with engine trouble on a desolate stretch of highway in the Southwest desert. A passing truck pulls over, and its friendly driver (the late J.T. Walsh) offers them a ride to a nearby diner where they can call for help. The husband stays with the car; the wife goes with the trucker. . . and vanishes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1991 | SUSAN KING
As a teen-ager growing up in Marin County in the late '60s, the music of Jim Morrison and the Doors did not light Kathleen Quinlan's fire. "I was a Motown R&B girl," she explains. "I remember hearing 'Light My Fire' but it wasn't my music of choice at the time. I was a little hippie. I had strict parents , but my mother didn't think I was doing anything too awful."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1997 | Steve Hochman
First Kathleen Quinlan gets a supporting actress Oscar nomination as the wife of a space-stranded astronaut in "Apollo 13." Now, she and Kurt Russell co-star in "Breakdown" as desert-stranded motorists. But around the Malibu Hills home she shares with husband Bruce Abbot and two sons, Quinlan, 42, is so handy you figure that with proper tools she could have taken care of either predicament. HOMEBODY: "I just finished working for four months in London on 'Event Horizon,' a science-fiction film.
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | Jack Matthews
It's so simple, it ought to be banal. A couple (Kurt Russell, pictured, Kathleen Quinlan) on a cross-country drive from New England to Southern California are stranded with engine trouble on a desolate stretch of highway in the Southwest desert. A passing truck pulls over, and its friendly driver (the late J.T. Walsh) offers them a ride to a nearby diner where they can call for help. The husband stays with the car; the wife goes with the trucker. . . and vanishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2001
First name--A photo in the TV grid of Monday's Calendar used the wrong first name for actress Kathleen Quinlan in the drama "Family Law."
BUSINESS
August 18, 2001 | Associated Press
CBS postponed a "Family Law" rerun that one of its largest advertisers, Procter & Gamble Co., said was too controversial for its commercials. In the episode scheduled to run this week, Kathleen Quinlan's character helps a woman fight manslaughter charges after her 8-year-old son accidentally shoots and kills his older brother with her handgun.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That PG rating for "Zeus and Roxanne" should be taken seriously: No adult should see this picture unaccompanied by a child, preferably no older than 10. Way too contrived and gooey for most grown-ups, it might well delight youngsters, especially its dramatic underwater sequences. Zeus is a sandy-haired dog belonging to a musician, Terry (Steve Guttenberg), and his small son (Miko Hughes), who have come to the Bahamas for a short stay.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | LEE MARGULIES
Tyne Daly and Richard Crenna are teamed in "Stuck With Each Other," a comedy film for NBC. They play co-workers who come into possession of $1 million in cash, then find themselves the object of an intense search by three men (Roscoe Lee Browne, Bubba Smith and Michael J. Pollard) who'd like it for themselves. Eileen Heckart plays Daly's mother. Lee Grant, who made a documentary about the homeless called "Down and Out in America," is going to direct a TV movie about the subject called, simply, "Homeless."
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | SUSAN KING
Here are the paintings upon which the Showtime "Picture Windows" episodes are based and their film masters. Each evening's trilogy begins at 8. Oct. 1 Soir Bleu: Based on the 1914 painting by Edward Hopper and directed by Norman Jewison. Alan Arkin, Dan Hedaya and Rosana DeSota star. Song of Songs: Inspired by Sandro Botticelli's "La Primavera" and directed by Peter Bogdanovich. George Segal, Sally Kirkland and Brooke Adams star.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1991 | SUSAN KING
As a teen-ager growing up in Marin County in the late '60s, the music of Jim Morrison and the Doors did not light Kathleen Quinlan's fire. "I was a Motown R&B girl," she explains. "I remember hearing 'Light My Fire' but it wasn't my music of choice at the time. I was a little hippie. I had strict parents , but my mother didn't think I was doing anything too awful."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Milan Stitt, 68, a playwright best known for "The Runner Stumbles," a drama about a fateful encounter in 1911 between a Catholic priest and a nun, died Thursday of liver cancer at St. Vincent's Hospital in New York. Since 1997 he had been head of the dramatic writing program at Carnegie Mellon University's School of Drama, which announced his death. He was chairman of the playwriting program at Yale University from 1987 to 1993. Stitt reworked "The Runner Stumbles" many times before he settled on a version that was produced at the Manhattan Theatre Club in 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Warning Sign" (citywide), a taut, swift but finally unconvincing high-tech thriller, wastes no time in building suspense. After a couple of idyllic shots of a Utah cornfield it cuts to a nearby lab where chief scientist Richard Dysart is checking out some test tubes, each of which is marked with a strip of tape. One of the tapes sticks to Dysart's sleeve, carrying the tube with it.
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