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Kathleen Willey

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NEWS
February 13, 1999
Kathleen Willey, the former Clinton campaign worker and onetime White House volunteer who claimed that the president made an unwanted sexual advance, has stayed out of public view since her explosive "60 Minutes" appearance in March 1998. During that interview, she described how, in desperate financial straits, she came to see President Clinton on Nov. 29, 1993, at the White House seeking a paid job.
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NEWS
May 27, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Friday rebuked a lower-court judge for declaring that President Clinton broke the law when he released friendly letters from former White House volunteer Kathleen Willey, who had gone on national television to accuse the president of making unwanted sexual advances. The appellate judges said that an opinion by U.S. District Judge Royce C.
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NEWS
March 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
Attorneys for Paula Corbin Jones filed court papers Saturday contending President Clinton obstructed justice by withholding letters, notes and telephone messages between the president and Kathleen Willey until after she accused him of a crude sexual advance on national television. In the new papers and an accompanying press release, the attorneys made an accusation against Clinton from 20 years ago involving a woman who had not been mentioned in the Jones case previously.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Independent counsel Robert W. Ray considers the investigation of President Clinton's relationship with Monica S. Lewinsky an "open matter" and is actively considering seeking an indictment against the president after he leaves office next January. Rather than winding down the independent counsel's office after the departure of Kenneth W.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reviving allegations of sexual misconduct against President Clinton, former White House volunteer Kathleen Willey testified publicly for the first time Tuesday about a 1993 episode in the Oval Office during which she says Clinton tried to force himself on her. "He tried to kiss me, and he was very forceful. His hands were all over me," a somber Willey testified. She added that even after she resisted, the president remarked "that he wanted to do that for a long time."
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week ago, Kathleen E. Willey's powerful, nationally televised account of President Clinton's unwelcome sexual advance shook the White House like an earthquake.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Willey, the star witness against a former friend accused of covering up a notorious 1993 encounter in the Oval Office, came under sharp attack Wednesday from defense attorneys who accused her of lying about the episode and forgetting key details. During nearly 2 1/2 hours of bruising cross-examination, Willey acknowledged repeated lapses of memory and contradictions in her accounts of how she was allegedly groped by President Clinton.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | From Reuters
A friend of Kathleen E. Willey, the former White House volunteer who said President Clinton groped her, was called Thursday before the grand jury investigating presidential sex and perjury allegations. Julie Hiatt Steele was expected to be asked about a sworn statement she made in March in which she said Willey asked her to lie about the encounter with Clinton.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came reality: A former White House volunteer appeared on CBS' "60 Minutes" on Sunday night to accuse President Clinton of fondling her. Then, a split second after the segment ended, came fantasy: a trailer for "Primary Colors," Universal Pictures' thinly veiled satire about Clinton, sex and politics, which opens Friday. Was the juxtaposition an orchestrated publicity stunt? Or merely a happy coincidence? The latter, executives at Universal said Monday. "We bought the spot in January. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1998 | BILL PRESS, Bill Press, a former chairman of the California Democratic Party, is co-host of CNN's "Crossfire."
I believe Kathleen Willey. She's no lounge singer, trying to become famous. She's no disgruntled state employee, trying to get even. She's no teenage groupie, trying to score, big time. Kathleen Willey is a mature woman. A woman wearing pearls. A mother. A widow. A Democrat who was devoted to Bill Clinton and his politics. A woman with no agenda, other than, it seems, finally telling the truth. Yes, there are holes in Willey's story, enough holes to cause serious doubts.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Willey, the star witness against a former friend accused of covering up a notorious 1993 encounter in the Oval Office, came under sharp attack Wednesday from defense attorneys who accused her of lying about the episode and forgetting key details. During nearly 2 1/2 hours of bruising cross-examination, Willey acknowledged repeated lapses of memory and contradictions in her accounts of how she was allegedly groped by President Clinton.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reviving allegations of sexual misconduct against President Clinton, former White House volunteer Kathleen Willey testified publicly for the first time Tuesday about a 1993 episode in the Oval Office during which she says Clinton tried to force himself on her. "He tried to kiss me, and he was very forceful. His hands were all over me," a somber Willey testified. She added that even after she resisted, the president remarked "that he wanted to do that for a long time."
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only person charged so far in connection with the Monica S. Lewinsky investigation went on trial here Monday, as prosecutors sought to show that money and loyalty drove Julie Hiatt Steele to cover up President Clinton's alleged groping of a White House volunteer. But defense attorneys for Steele said independent counsel Kenneth W.
NEWS
March 27, 1999 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cracks are appearing in independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's case against Julie Hiatt Steele, one of the minor players in the Monica S. Lewinsky scandal, and the problems are casting doubt on Kathleen Willey's claim that President Clinton made an unwelcome sexual advance toward her in the White House.
NEWS
February 13, 1999
Kathleen Willey, the former Clinton campaign worker and onetime White House volunteer who claimed that the president made an unwanted sexual advance, has stayed out of public view since her explosive "60 Minutes" appearance in March 1998. During that interview, she described how, in desperate financial straits, she came to see President Clinton on Nov. 29, 1993, at the White House seeking a paid job.
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr obtained a new federal indictment Friday against former Justice Department official Webster L. Hubbell and submitted to House investigators information related to allegations that President Clinton fondled a White House volunteer in 1993. The 15-count indictment accused Hubbell, a close friend of the president and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, of attempting to obstruct federal investigations of his Little Rock, Ark.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Independent counsel Robert W. Ray considers the investigation of President Clinton's relationship with Monica S. Lewinsky an "open matter" and is actively considering seeking an indictment against the president after he leaves office next January. Rather than winding down the independent counsel's office after the departure of Kenneth W.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | From Reuters
A friend of Kathleen E. Willey, the former White House volunteer who said President Clinton groped her, was called Thursday before the grand jury investigating presidential sex and perjury allegations. Julie Hiatt Steele was expected to be asked about a sworn statement she made in March in which she said Willey asked her to lie about the encounter with Clinton.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN and TOM SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Texas) suggested Tuesday that President Clinton should resign, while a friend of Kathleen E. Willey, who has accused Clinton of groping her, and a White House archivist were questioned before a federal grand jury here. Army's implicit call for Clinton's resignation ranks as the most severe criticism leveled by a Republican leader since the controversy surrounding the president's relationship with former White House intern Monica S.
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