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Kava

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HEALTH
December 30, 2002 | Shari Roan
Kava, an herb from the South Pacific islands, has long been used to create a sense of relaxation and well-being. But cases of adverse side effects associated with the use of kava supplements are mounting. Uses: The root from the kava plant historically has been used as a social drug. As a supplement, it's touted as a mild natural tranquilizer that can relieve anxiety and stress. It's sometimes used to treat insomnia. Dose: Usually 300 milligrams per day.
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TRAVEL
April 18, 2011 | By Amanda Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If — like me — you are old enough to say, "It didn't used to look like this," then — like me — you're probably seeking places that are still relatively unaffected by rampant tourism. Last summer, I had the pleasure of visiting such a place. Nukubati, a small island resort, is about as untouched by time as it gets. Thirty-seven years ago, I came to Fiji, an archipelago in the South Pacific at the western edge of the Polynesian triangle, with my parents and had my first taste of adventure travel.
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BUSINESS
December 29, 2009 | By Jerry Hirsch
In Los Angeles, where medical marijuana dispensaries outnumber Starbucks and McDonald's restaurants combined, a mood-altering beverage with a cannabis-oriented marketing campaign is gaining traction. Southern California has become the bestselling market for Mary Jane's Relaxing Soda, a sugary drink laced with kava, a South Pacific root purported to have sedative properties. Matt Moody, a Denver nutritional supplement developer who created the beverage, said the name is an unabashed reference to weed, though the relaxant compounds in kava are chemically unrelated to those in marijuana.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2009 | By Jerry Hirsch
In Los Angeles, where medical marijuana dispensaries outnumber Starbucks and McDonald's restaurants combined, a mood-altering beverage with a cannabis-oriented marketing campaign is gaining traction. Southern California has become the bestselling market for Mary Jane's Relaxing Soda, a sugary drink laced with kava, a South Pacific root purported to have sedative properties. Matt Moody, a Denver nutritional supplement developer who created the beverage, said the name is an unabashed reference to weed, though the relaxant compounds in kava are chemically unrelated to those in marijuana.
TRAVEL
April 1, 2007
Your article about awa ["Relax, It's Awa," Special Issue, March 18] was quite interesting, especially with regard to the increase in awa bars in vacation spots. Although the historical information was accurate, I am concerned that there was no mention of potential serious side effects. The Food and Drug Administration as well as the Centers for Disease Control have published warnings about potential links of kava to liver failure. Also, many evidence-based herbal references state that kava has depressant, muscle-relaxing, intoxicating effects that could impair driving.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2007 | Julia Steele, Special to The Times
AT first glance, the Diamond Head Cove Health Bar hardly looks like it's in the vanguard of 21st century Hawaiian culture. True, it sits on the slopes of the islands' most famous landmark, Diamond Head. But it's in a mini-mall, sandwiched between a beauty parlor and a barbecue plate lunch shop. There's neon in the windows and a Mexican restaurant across the street. Step inside, however, and you'll know in an instant that you've left Waikiki behind and tapped into the native zeitgeist.
TRAVEL
February 13, 2000 | MIKE McINTYRE
Our boat was 15 miles northwest of Fiji's main island of Viti Levu when the skipper, Sala Saucoko, said we had entered Bligh Water. It was in this part of the South Pacific, in 1789, that Capt. William Bligh and 18 others were chased by two Fijian war canoes. Bligh and his men, cast adrift days earlier by mutineers on the Bounty, pulled frantically on the oars of their longboat, narrowly escaping the savages. Saucoko laughed at the image of the sailors fleeing his ancestors.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
You may recall that "Heaven's Gate" was a long--and costly--time in the making. Well, for part of the film's Northwestern location shoot, Caroline Kava took up residence in a local house of prostitution. Research for her role, of course. Eventually, the movie wrapped and the actress went home to New York. But Kava kept thinking about those women. The result is her first play, "The Early Girl," opening Saturday at the Back Alley. "I never met, never saw a client," she stressed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A man should stand trial for allegedly driving under the influence of kava tea, a panel of three San Mateo County judges has ruled. The decision overturns an earlier dismissal of charges against Sione Olive, 26, of Arizona. Olive drank 23 cups of kava tea--a relaxing elixir popular among people from the South Pacific--before climbing behind the wheel in June 2000.
HEALTH
March 4, 2002 | BARRIE R. CASSILETH, Barrie R. Cassileth, PhD, is chief of integrative medicine at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.
Sometimes, disappointing news appears about a natural product that seems to benefit our health. Such is the case with kava, a herbal remedy sold in the United States as an alternative pain reliever, relaxation aid and memory enhancer. Recent reports from Germany and Switzerland suggest that kava may damage the liver.
TRAVEL
April 1, 2007
Your article about awa ["Relax, It's Awa," Special Issue, March 18] was quite interesting, especially with regard to the increase in awa bars in vacation spots. Although the historical information was accurate, I am concerned that there was no mention of potential serious side effects. The Food and Drug Administration as well as the Centers for Disease Control have published warnings about potential links of kava to liver failure. Also, many evidence-based herbal references state that kava has depressant, muscle-relaxing, intoxicating effects that could impair driving.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2007 | Julia Steele, Special to The Times
AT first glance, the Diamond Head Cove Health Bar hardly looks like it's in the vanguard of 21st century Hawaiian culture. True, it sits on the slopes of the islands' most famous landmark, Diamond Head. But it's in a mini-mall, sandwiched between a beauty parlor and a barbecue plate lunch shop. There's neon in the windows and a Mexican restaurant across the street. Step inside, however, and you'll know in an instant that you've left Waikiki behind and tapped into the native zeitgeist.
HEALTH
December 30, 2002 | Shari Roan
Kava, an herb from the South Pacific islands, has long been used to create a sense of relaxation and well-being. But cases of adverse side effects associated with the use of kava supplements are mounting. Uses: The root from the kava plant historically has been used as a social drug. As a supplement, it's touted as a mild natural tranquilizer that can relieve anxiety and stress. It's sometimes used to treat insomnia. Dose: Usually 300 milligrams per day.
NEWS
March 26, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration warned consumers and doctors Monday that kava, a popular dietary supplement, carries a "potential risk" of causing severe liver damage. The advisory urged kava consumers and their doctors to be on the lookout for signs of liver injury. It came three months after the FDA asked doctors to review their cases for links between kava and liver problems.
HEALTH
March 4, 2002 | BARRIE R. CASSILETH, Barrie R. Cassileth, PhD, is chief of integrative medicine at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.
Sometimes, disappointing news appears about a natural product that seems to benefit our health. Such is the case with kava, a herbal remedy sold in the United States as an alternative pain reliever, relaxation aid and memory enhancer. Recent reports from Germany and Switzerland suggest that kava may damage the liver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A man should stand trial for allegedly driving under the influence of kava tea, a panel of three San Mateo County judges has ruled. The decision overturns an earlier dismissal of charges against Sione Olive, 26, of Arizona. Olive drank 23 cups of kava tea--a relaxing elixir popular among people from the South Pacific--before climbing behind the wheel in June 2000.
NEWS
March 26, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration warned consumers and doctors Monday that kava, a popular dietary supplement, carries a "potential risk" of causing severe liver damage. The advisory urged kava consumers and their doctors to be on the lookout for signs of liver injury. It came three months after the FDA asked doctors to review their cases for links between kava and liver problems.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the predawn gloom of an empty roadside in this suburban city south of San Francisco, modern American life collided with ancient Tongan tradition and wound up in court. Taufui Piutau, a native of Tonga, was cited for driving under the influence--of kava tea, a legal substance widely used in Polynesian social rituals.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the predawn gloom of an empty roadside in this suburban city south of San Francisco, modern American life collided with ancient Tongan tradition and wound up in court. Taufui Piutau, a native of Tonga, was cited for driving under the influence--of kava tea, a legal substance widely used in Polynesian social rituals.
TRAVEL
February 13, 2000 | MIKE McINTYRE
Our boat was 15 miles northwest of Fiji's main island of Viti Levu when the skipper, Sala Saucoko, said we had entered Bligh Water. It was in this part of the South Pacific, in 1789, that Capt. William Bligh and 18 others were chased by two Fijian war canoes. Bligh and his men, cast adrift days earlier by mutineers on the Bounty, pulled frantically on the oars of their longboat, narrowly escaping the savages. Saucoko laughed at the image of the sailors fleeing his ancestors.
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