Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKazakhstan Culture
IN THE NEWS

Kazakhstan Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so he built towers of human skulls from Baghdad to New Delhi. If Soviet history portrayed Tamerlane as nothing but a bloodthirsty conqueror, so what? In this long-forgotten capital of his 14th and early 15th century empire, history can be--and is being--rewritten. Tamerlane is back--on equestrian statues proclaiming "My Strength Is in Justice." In a bizarre revival, post-Soviet Uzbekistan has repackaged the Mongol tyrant as an enlightened prince and national role model.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so he built towers of human skulls from Baghdad to New Delhi. If Soviet history portrayed Tamerlane as nothing but a bloodthirsty conqueror, so what? In this long-forgotten capital of his 14th and early 15th century empire, history can be--and is being--rewritten. Tamerlane is back--on equestrian statues proclaiming "My Strength Is in Justice." In a bizarre revival, post-Soviet Uzbekistan has repackaged the Mongol tyrant as an enlightened prince and national role model.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Chaichenko was up at 4 a.m., long before the sun revealed the flat, boundless steppe. He spent the morning rebuilding a tractor from old parts. Then he gathered seeds for the new planting season. Late into evening he was pouring a concrete floor for a barn. Six decades after Stalin forced his grandparents onto a Soviet collective, Chaichenko is working harder than ever--for himself. He produces nearly twice as much wheat per acre as the state farm he abandoned three years ago.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Chaichenko was up at 4 a.m., long before the sun revealed the flat, boundless steppe. He spent the morning rebuilding a tractor from old parts. Then he gathered seeds for the new planting season. Late into evening he was pouring a concrete floor for a barn. Six decades after Stalin forced his grandparents onto a Soviet collective, Chaichenko is working harder than ever--for himself. He produces nearly twice as much wheat per acre as the state farm he abandoned three years ago.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|