Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKazakhstan Government
IN THE NEWS

Kazakhstan Government

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | Associated Press
Kazakhstan's Parliament voted Friday to disband and let President Nursultan Nazarbayev rule the oil-rich Central Asian nation by decree until new elections in March. The lawmakers also abolished Kazakhstan's more than 200 regional legislatures, leaving local power in the hands of the president's appointed regional administrators.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 24, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since their past was swallowed up by war in 1993, the members of Azerbaijan's Karabakh soccer team have lived the shiftless lives of refugees, carrying on with their sport even though they have not set eyes on their homeland of Nagorno-Karabakh since its Armenian majority drove the men out of the disputed enclave in a vicious ethnic war. The dispossessed soccer stars slowly reassembled in this filthy industrial town 300 miles east of the sparkling, but now deadly, hills of their birth.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 17, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, clearly asserting his authority as the new leader of the disintegrating Soviet Union, said Monday that the new Commonwealth of Independent States will grow to 10 republics by the month's end. With Secretary of State James A. Baker III standing at his side in the ornate St.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Kazakhstan President Nursultan Nazarbayev is in Washington to sign two agreements allowing Western companies to export oil from his country. One agreement, a $6-billion project of BG of Britain, Agip of Italy and Texaco Inc. of New York, allows those companies to develop the Karachaganak field near Kazakhstan's northern border with Russia. The other involves Mobil Corp., Agip, BG, British Petroleum, Shell Oil Co., Norway's Statoil and France's Total, said Mobil spokesman Dave Dickson.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vanishing Soviet Union was wrenched by conflicting pressures Friday as another republic, oil-rich Azerbaijan, declared its independence, while two others, Russia and Kazakhstan, agreed on the urgent need to join forces to avert catastrophe.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Nursultan A. Nazarbayev, accepting a ruling by the Central Asian republic's highest court that voting last year was rigged, dissolved Parliament and told a hastily called news conference that new elections will be held in two to three months. He said he has appointed a new government to be headed by Prime Minister Akezhan Kazhegeldin.
NEWS
February 24, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since their past was swallowed up by war in 1993, the members of Azerbaijan's Karabakh soccer team have lived the shiftless lives of refugees, carrying on with their sport even though they have not set eyes on their homeland of Nagorno-Karabakh since its Armenian majority drove the men out of the disputed enclave in a vicious ethnic war. The dispossessed soccer stars slowly reassembled in this filthy industrial town 300 miles east of the sparkling, but now deadly, hills of their birth.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so he built towers of human skulls from Baghdad to New Delhi. If Soviet history portrayed Tamerlane as nothing but a bloodthirsty conqueror, so what? In this long-forgotten capital of his 14th and early 15th century empire, history can be--and is being--rewritten. Tamerlane is back--on equestrian statues proclaiming "My Strength Is in Justice." In a bizarre revival, post-Soviet Uzbekistan has repackaged the Mongol tyrant as an enlightened prince and national role model.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Week after week, an 83-year-old Frenchman meets with President Nursultan A. Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan to offer him the same advice: Take power. Alexei A. Moskovich, Moscow-born but French-raised, has been an author, a soldier and the vice mayor of Paris. Before becoming one of Nazarbayev's top advisers, Moskovich had also advised Gen. Charles de Gaulle.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union is no more, Russia and the Ukraine concluded Thursday. But the two demographic and economic giants then expressed alarm at what may follow--"uncontrolled disintegration." At 1 a.m. Thursday, after nine hours of intense talks, bleary-eyed leaders of the Ukraine and Russia announced that the evaporation of centralized, nationwide rule from Moscow means that some kind of inter-republic institutions--to get food to market and to run the Soviet armed forces--are now urgently needed.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so he built towers of human skulls from Baghdad to New Delhi. If Soviet history portrayed Tamerlane as nothing but a bloodthirsty conqueror, so what? In this long-forgotten capital of his 14th and early 15th century empire, history can be--and is being--rewritten. Tamerlane is back--on equestrian statues proclaiming "My Strength Is in Justice." In a bizarre revival, post-Soviet Uzbekistan has repackaged the Mongol tyrant as an enlightened prince and national role model.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Week after week, an 83-year-old Frenchman meets with President Nursultan A. Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan to offer him the same advice: Take power. Alexei A. Moskovich, Moscow-born but French-raised, has been an author, a soldier and the vice mayor of Paris. Before becoming one of Nazarbayev's top advisers, Moskovich had also advised Gen. Charles de Gaulle.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Nursultan A. Nazarbayev is in the midst of a coup to take unfettered control of this enormous, oil-rich country in Central Asia--a region of five nations that broke free of the Soviet Union only to grow increasingly dictatorial themselves. Since becoming president in 1991, Nazarbayev has been the driving force behind capitalist economic reforms.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Nursultan A. Nazarbayev, accepting a ruling by the Central Asian republic's highest court that voting last year was rigged, dissolved Parliament and told a hastily called news conference that new elections will be held in two to three months. He said he has appointed a new government to be headed by Prime Minister Akezhan Kazhegeldin.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | Associated Press
Kazakhstan's Parliament voted Friday to disband and let President Nursultan Nazarbayev rule the oil-rich Central Asian nation by decree until new elections in March. The lawmakers also abolished Kazakhstan's more than 200 regional legislatures, leaving local power in the hands of the president's appointed regional administrators.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is launching a new initiative in Central Asia, one of the last frontiers for U.S. foreign policy and one of the most problematic. Four of the region's five republics are the last bastions of unrepentant Communist rule in the new Commonwealth of Independent States. They are also the most impoverished and in need of outside help.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Nursultan A. Nazarbayev is in the midst of a coup to take unfettered control of this enormous, oil-rich country in Central Asia--a region of five nations that broke free of the Soviet Union only to grow increasingly dictatorial themselves. Since becoming president in 1991, Nazarbayev has been the driving force behind capitalist economic reforms.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | Steven Gutterman, a researcher in The Times' Moscow Bureau.
As the Commonwealth of Independent States rises on the ruins of the Soviet Union, who will be its most important figures? Here are some of the VIPs taking charge of the new, post-Soviet world: BORIS NIKOLAYEVICH YELTSIN Age: 60 Position: President of Russia Background: Graduated from Ural Polytechnic Institute in 1955 . . . spent 30 years in hometown of Sverdlovsk, western Siberia, before coming to Moscow in 1985 as chief of Communist Party Central Committee's construction department.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | Steven Gutterman, a researcher in The Times' Moscow Bureau.
As the Commonwealth of Independent States rises on the ruins of the Soviet Union, who will be its most important figures? Here are some of the VIPs taking charge of the new, post-Soviet world: BORIS NIKOLAYEVICH YELTSIN Age: 60 Position: President of Russia Background: Graduated from Ural Polytechnic Institute in 1955 . . . spent 30 years in hometown of Sverdlovsk, western Siberia, before coming to Moscow in 1985 as chief of Communist Party Central Committee's construction department.
NEWS
December 17, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, clearly asserting his authority as the new leader of the disintegrating Soviet Union, said Monday that the new Commonwealth of Independent States will grow to 10 republics by the month's end. With Secretary of State James A. Baker III standing at his side in the ornate St.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|