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Kcrw Radio Station

ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Walt Riker, press secretary to Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.) apologized Sunday for having called Santa Monica's KCRW-FM (89.9), a "dwarf radio station" last week in response to protests from station officials and listeners about the hold that Dole's office has put on funding bill for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. "I was trying to make the point that the recession and the budget dwarfed the issue of public broadcasting, but it came out wrong," Riker said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not much has happened in Washington in the two months since a group of conservative Republican senators--claiming that public television and radio were too liberal--used a procedural ploy to hold up a bill authorizing funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. But locally, a torrent of concern over the action--known in Senate jargon as a "hold"--has been unleashed by Santa Monica public-radio station KCRW-FM (89.9), which has been using the situation as a fund-raising tool.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Americans think of Mexico, says Mexican television director Hector Tajonar Loyola, they are much more likely to think of its scenic beach resorts or its vibrant artworks than its contributions to world literature. "It's a very visual image we have of Mexico," he said. "Very few Americans think of Mexican literature because they don't know it." Loyola would like that to change.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1991 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Radio drama is taking a step toward recovery this week with the start of a $1.2-million expansion project at KCRW-FM's basement studios at Santa Monica College. Designed in consultation with the British Broadcasting Corp., the construction represents the first new radio drama studio built in the Los Angeles area since the 1950s. KCRW (89.9 FM) already broadcasts more radio drama than any other commercial or non-commercial station in the United States, said station manager Ruth Hirschman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the time it took KCRW-FM (89.9) to find a new music director, the former music director had left his new job and come back to the Santa Monica-based public-radio station. The station completed its drawn-out search for a music director this week when it announced that Chris Douridas, the host of its "Morning Becomes Eclectic" program, would fill the post last held by Tom Schnabel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Feeling the sting from falling corporate and public contributions, National Public Radio has cut back its hourly newscasts by 25%. The decision to reduce the programs from 24 per day to 18 was quickly implemented: Top management told affiliated stations about the cuts April 23, and they went into effect Sunday night. "It just became financially impossible" to do the newscasts, said NPR spokeswoman Mary Morgan. The turnaround was so fast that some programmers didn't even know about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Monica public-radio station KCRW-FM (89.9) enters its spring pledge drive this week bolstered by increased listenership--thanks to the Persian Gulf War--but facing a string of obstacles ranging from the slow economy to increased competition from its neighbor to the northeast, KPCC-FM (89.3) in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1991 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is a regular contributor to The Times.
If the names Rene Engel, Isabel Holt, Terry Gross, Ian Whitcomb, John McNally and Marian McPartland mean anything to you, then chances are you are someone who has listened to KCRW-FM (89.9) in the past and remember them as familiar on-air personalities whose voices disappeared from the Santa Monica public-radio station over the last few years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Schnabel, host of "Morning Becomes Eclectic" on KCRW-FM (89.9), was at a local record store this week when a woman browsing in the New Age section mistook him for a store employee and asked for assistance. Schnabel responded as only a true music aficionado would. "They were busy and I know where everything is, so I helped her," he said. "She wanted to get this record that was really bad, and the record next to it was really good. I wanted to say to her, 'Why are you getting that? Get this.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1990 | LEE MARGULIES
Mornings may still be eclectic, but for many KCRW-FM (89.9) listeners, they'll soon be very different. Tom Schnabel, the station's music director and morning-show host for the past 11 years, will be departing Oct. 12 to take a job with A & M Records. Over the years, Schnabel built a devoted following with his "Morning Becomes Eclectic" program, broadcast weekdays from 9 a.m. to noon, in which he lived up to the title by presenting music that spanned both history and the globe.
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