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Keanu Reeves

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By John Horn
“We believe you are the only one who can help us.” That ominous plea comes about halfway through the new trailer for “47 Ronin,” and while it's directed at the character played by Keanu Reeves the entreaty could also describe how much Universal Pictures needs the actor to deliver a big audience for the troubled production. Filmed in early 2011, the expensive movie - the budget was originally $175 million but has surpassed that figure - originally was set for release last Thanksgiving.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Stephen Colbert's "Colbert Report" has never been the most comfortable place for Hollywood stars to promote their movies, given the somewhat niche audience and Colbert's own purposefully bombastic, playfully antagonistic persona. But now that Colbert is stepping up to succeed David Letterman as the host of "The Late Show" in 2015 and dropping his conservative blowhard character, audiences could see a different side of him. Time will tell how Colbert gets along with Hollywood's A-list stars in his new role, and how much of his trademark quirk carries over, but it will certainly be an adjustment both for him and the studios that want their stars on the show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2008 | Chris Lee
Zen-like aloofness. Deadpan line-delivery. A certain dumbstruck cool verging on total blankness. These are some of Keanu Reeves' actorly calling cards -- a skill set that allows him to portray everything from a time-traveling stoner ("Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure") to a Messiah-like demigod (in the "Matrix" trilogy). You wouldn't necessarily associate such dude-itude with gun-toting, perp-busting cop roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2013 | By Chris Lee
In "47 Ronin," Keanu Reeves portrays the leader of a band of ronin - masterless samurai in 18th-century Japan who must suffer the indignity of having no one to lead them in battle. Turns out that plot line provides an apt metaphor for the period 3-D sci-fi epic's problem-plagued odyssey to the screen. "47 Ronin" arrived in theaters Christmas Day as one of the most troubled movie productions in recent memory, as well as one of 2013's most spectacular flops-in-the-making. According to pre-release awareness surveys, the revenge thriller, which cost at least $175 million to produce, is on track to earn around $20 million in its opening five days.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Robert Abele
The "Bill & Ted's"-style flop-mop that martial artist Tiger Chen sports in "Man of Tai Chi" isn't the only reminder of Keanu Reeves in this directorial debut from the "Matrix" star. There's Reeves himself, using his lower surfer-register for the forces of evil as a Hong Kong businessman who corrupts Chen's idealistic, working class tai chi disciple by turning him into an underground fight club star. But what's most cosmically appropriate about this no-nonsense yet all-nonsense action flick is how Reeves' greatest strength as a star - his fluid, imposing physicality - is also his best asset as a director.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Universal Pictures' troubled big-budget film "47 Ronin," starring Keanu Reeves, has been delayed for a second time. It is now scheduled to come out on Dec. 25, 2013. Originally set for Nov. 21 of this year, "Ronin" in April was pushed to Feb. 8, 2013, to allow time for reshoots and work on its extensive 3-D visual effects, which have not yet begun. The movie, which stars Reeves along with an all-Japanese cast, is a retelling of the classic myth of a group of samurai who avenge the death of their master.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Walking for the first time into his suite at the Four Seasons Hotel, Keanu Reeves is so thoroughly not of his Beverly Hills surroundings that it wouldn't surprise you if security had detained him on the way up. In hiking boots, tattered jeans and a suede jacket decorated with white stains, Reeves' style sense today is appropriately disheveled, to go with several days' growth of beard and floppy bangs that curve inward and meet in the vicinity of his nose.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1995 | SANDY MASUO
In "Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure," the film that put Keanu Reeves on the celluloid map, he and his cohort, Bill, a pair of wayward Southern California high-schoolers who worship Eddie Van Halen, time-travel through history to meet their destiny: a band called Wyld Stallions that eventually plays a pivotal role in the evolution of humanity. Six years later, Reeves is one of Hollywood's hottest young stars, and he also has his own real-life rock band.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Lim is a freelance writer.
As a time-traveling high school dude in the "Bill and Ted" movies, Keanu Reeves blazed a path through the great expanse of Western civilization, with detours to heaven and hell for good measure. In the "Matrix" trilogy, he was Neo, the One, the hacker turned messiah who uncovers the underlying reality of our reality. More recently, in "A Scanner Darkly," Richard Linklater's rotoscoped adaptation of the Philip K.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By Sheri Linden
Life-changing epiphanies come in all shapes and sizes, but the one that transforms the protagonist of "Henry's Crime" is a strange bird indeed: implausible and barely perceptible. In part, that's because of Keanu Reeves' blank take on a working stiff turned lawbreaker. Beyond his performance, the film's ungainly mix of heist, romance and backstage comedy never jells. It's never painful, though, especially when James Caan and Vera Farmiga are onscreen. But there's only so much life anyone could breathe into this inert caper.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
There's the kind of movie that comes riding into theaters on such a prolonged wave of bad buzz - changed release dates, backstage whispers of production troubles and a swelling budget - that the film itself starts to seem beside the point, something to just get out of the way. That's the case with "47 Ronin," an overlong, underwhelming movie now hitting theaters that certainly wasn't worth the wait. The story opens with a stentorian voice-over announcing that ancient feudal Japan, as history buffs will no doubt be happy to learn, was a time of witchcraft and demons.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Robert Abele
The "Bill & Ted's"-style flop-mop that martial artist Tiger Chen sports in "Man of Tai Chi" isn't the only reminder of Keanu Reeves in this directorial debut from the "Matrix" star. There's Reeves himself, using his lower surfer-register for the forces of evil as a Hong Kong businessman who corrupts Chen's idealistic, working class tai chi disciple by turning him into an underground fight club star. But what's most cosmically appropriate about this no-nonsense yet all-nonsense action flick is how Reeves' greatest strength as a star - his fluid, imposing physicality - is also his best asset as a director.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By John Horn
“We believe you are the only one who can help us.” That ominous plea comes about halfway through the new trailer for “47 Ronin,” and while it's directed at the character played by Keanu Reeves the entreaty could also describe how much Universal Pictures needs the actor to deliver a big audience for the troubled production. Filmed in early 2011, the expensive movie - the budget was originally $175 million but has surpassed that figure - originally was set for release last Thanksgiving.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING -- Forget Zach Snyder's "Man of Steel" or Keanu Reeves' "Man of Tai Chi. " China's movie of the summer is a chick flick that has touched off a mini-culture war while raking in the renminbi -- and a sequel is just weeks away. "Tiny Times" tells the story of four fashionable college girls in Shanghai and is perhaps best described as "The Devil Wears Prada" meets "Sex and the City" (minus the sex) with a dash of "The Bling Ring. " The movie is based on a trio of popular young adult novels by Guo Jingming, a waifish 30-year-old celebrity author/entrepreneur who also directed the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
At 48, Keanu Reeves is twice the age of his nubile costar Adelaide Clemens in "Generation Um... " and the generation gap might explain why they spend the film staring at each other blankly. Reeves plays John, a driver for an escort service who works nights shuttling Mia (Clemens), a placid baby-doll blond, and her raging cokehead partner, Violet (Bojana Novakovic, often pants-less). The women aren't John's friends, exactly - they alternate between pestering him and pleasuring him in a grotty bathroom, both of which make writer-director Mark Mann's feature debut sound more exciting than it is. After an inert first act in which John eats cupcakes and watches strangers, he finally leaps to action by stealing a video camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Carmike Cinemas, the nation's fourth-largest movie theater chain, received a bomb threat on Friday against locations across the country. Local authorities have inspected theaters in  Illinois, North Carolina and Oklahoma and found no evidence of danger, said Terrell Mayton, Carmike's director of marketing. "We are ready for guests to enjoy movies this afternoon," he said. The threats, which were called in to Carmike's corporate headquarters in Columbus, Ga., were aimed at theaters premiering Lionsgate's "The Expendables 2. " Mayton said that Carmike is cooperating with the Federal Bureau of Investigation on the case and more information would be released later Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
At 48, Keanu Reeves is twice the age of his nubile costar Adelaide Clemens in "Generation Um... " and the generation gap might explain why they spend the film staring at each other blankly. Reeves plays John, a driver for an escort service who works nights shuttling Mia (Clemens), a placid baby-doll blond, and her raging cokehead partner, Violet (Bojana Novakovic, often pants-less). The women aren't John's friends, exactly - they alternate between pestering him and pleasuring him in a grotty bathroom, both of which make writer-director Mark Mann's feature debut sound more exciting than it is. After an inert first act in which John eats cupcakes and watches strangers, he finally leaps to action by stealing a video camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012
It sounds a bit kooky - Keanu Reeves acting as producer, narrator and onscreen interlocutor for a documentary on the transition of industrialized filmmaking from a photochemical process to a digital one. Keanu Reeves? Yet the doc"Side by Side,"directed by Chris Kenneally, turns out to be a sharp, useful primer on the history of digital imagemaking and the rapid transition away from film happening throughout the production workflow of making movies. Whether out of their own interest in the topic or Reeves' gravitational star-pull, those who participate are an impressive who's who that includes directors Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, James Cameron, David Lynch, David Fincher, Steven Soderbergh and Andy and Lana Wachowski as well as cinematographers Michael Chapman, Vittorio Storaro, Reed Morano, Bradford Young and Anthony Dod Mantle.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012
It sounds a bit kooky - Keanu Reeves acting as producer, narrator and onscreen interlocutor for a documentary on the transition of industrialized filmmaking from a photochemical process to a digital one. Keanu Reeves? Yet the doc"Side by Side,"directed by Chris Kenneally, turns out to be a sharp, useful primer on the history of digital imagemaking and the rapid transition away from film happening throughout the production workflow of making movies. Whether out of their own interest in the topic or Reeves' gravitational star-pull, those who participate are an impressive who's who that includes directors Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, James Cameron, David Lynch, David Fincher, Steven Soderbergh and Andy and Lana Wachowski as well as cinematographers Michael Chapman, Vittorio Storaro, Reed Morano, Bradford Young and Anthony Dod Mantle.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Universal Pictures' troubled big-budget film "47 Ronin," starring Keanu Reeves, has been delayed for a second time. It is now scheduled to come out on Dec. 25, 2013. Originally set for Nov. 21 of this year, "Ronin" in April was pushed to Feb. 8, 2013, to allow time for reshoots and work on its extensive 3-D visual effects, which have not yet begun. The movie, which stars Reeves along with an all-Japanese cast, is a retelling of the classic myth of a group of samurai who avenge the death of their master.
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