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August 31, 1995 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kedric Robin Wolfe says performing is the equivalent of a marathon. His latest effort, three shows in repertory, must be an Ironman triathlon. Either way, "performance art" is an inadequate description. Wolfe is a one-man ensemble, invoking the scalp-prickling awe of watching a schizophrenic change personalities. He is a poetic storyteller who is simultaneously a character, narrator and commentator. And he is a dancer who draws fleeting images of flames and graffiti in the air.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1995 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kedric Robin Wolfe says performing is the equivalent of a marathon. His latest effort, three shows in repertory, must be an Ironman triathlon. Either way, "performance art" is an inadequate description. Wolfe is a one-man ensemble, invoking the scalp-prickling awe of watching a schizophrenic change personalities. He is a poetic storyteller who is simultaneously a character, narrator and commentator. And he is a dancer who draws fleeting images of flames and graffiti in the air.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN DEMAC
When you tell the story of someone's life, where do you begin? In "Warren's Story," a one-man show at San Diego Repertory Theatre through March 8, Kedric Robin Wolfe tells a three-generation saga beginning with his Uncle Warren, the mad barber of Canton, Ohio. It's hard to imagine anyone else pulling off this sometimes convoluted, incredibly personal, many-men-in-one-man show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
"I don't know whether to say thank you or I'm sorry" is the way Deborah Slater's tribute to Jean Cocteau began at the Gallery Theatre in Barnsdall Park last weekend. That pretty much sums up the reaction of this writer to the strange triple-header in three short acts by different performers under the suspect title "In the Spirit of Jean Cocteau." Cocteau would have had grave difficulty finding his spirit in these pieces by Slater, Blue Palm (Jacqueline Planeix and Thomas Crocker)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
"I don't know whether to say thank you or I'm sorry" is the way Deborah Slater's tribute to Jean Cocteau began at the Gallery Theatre in Barnsdall Park last weekend. That pretty much sums up the reaction of this writer to the strange triple-header in three short acts by different performers under the suspect title "In the Spirit of Jean Cocteau." Cocteau would have had grave difficulty finding his spirit in these pieces by Slater, Blue Palm (Jacqueline Planeix and Thomas Crocker)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
One recent sunny afternoon at the Odyssey Theatre, Kedric Robin Wolfe sat cross-legged inside a home-made steel cage on wheels. Would his visitor like to join him? Wolfe inquired politely. No? OK. Tonight, the locally based performance artist opens at the Odyssey in "Flights of Fear and Fancy With Kedric Robin Wolfe," an evening composed of two solo pieces, "There Was a Horse" and "Let Me Explain."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Since performer Kedric Robin Wolfe got a standing ovation at the Wallenboyd Theatre Saturday--and it wasn't even opening night--he must have something to say to an audience. I'll be hornswoggled if I can see what it is. Wolfe was appearing on the "Angel's Flight" series, sponsored by Pipeline and the Museum of Contemporary Art. He performed a self-created piece called "Warren's Story."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
When Kedric Robin Wolfe, tall as a telephone pole, walks on stage at the Odyssey 3 in West Los Angeles, his gaze wanders dreamily over the audience. "Where did their eyes first meet that day?" he asks as if speaking of lovers. But Wolfe has a very different kind of bond in mind: The hate that a fired employee harbored for the boss who disgraced him over a $69 theft. And we're off on "Flights of Fear and Fancy," an evening of two monologues.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Inside Kedric Robin Wolfe is a 4-year-old who loves to run around the house making noises like a fire engine. RUM, RUM, RUM! AROOOOOO! Wolfe's inner child is not trying to get out. He is out already. See his piece on the Angel's Flight series at the Museum of Contemporary Art, "Blind Stab." It is terrible, but one can see why it got a standing ovation Thursday night, where the evening's first piece, Jan Munroe's "Blood Is . . ," did not. Munroe is only an artist. Wolfe is a character.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
When Kedric Robin Wolfe, tall as a telephone pole, walks on stage at the Odyssey 3 in West Los Angeles, his gaze wanders dreamily over the audience. "Where did their eyes first meet that day?" he asks as if speaking of lovers. But Wolfe has a very different kind of bond in mind: The hate that a fired employee harbored for the boss who disgraced him over a $69 theft. And we're off on "Flights of Fear and Fancy," an evening of two monologues.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
One recent sunny afternoon at the Odyssey Theatre, Kedric Robin Wolfe sat cross-legged inside a home-made steel cage on wheels. Would his visitor like to join him? Wolfe inquired politely. No? OK. Tonight, the locally based performance artist opens at the Odyssey in "Flights of Fear and Fancy With Kedric Robin Wolfe," an evening composed of two solo pieces, "There Was a Horse" and "Let Me Explain."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN DEMAC
When you tell the story of someone's life, where do you begin? In "Warren's Story," a one-man show at San Diego Repertory Theatre through March 8, Kedric Robin Wolfe tells a three-generation saga beginning with his Uncle Warren, the mad barber of Canton, Ohio. It's hard to imagine anyone else pulling off this sometimes convoluted, incredibly personal, many-men-in-one-man show.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Since performer Kedric Robin Wolfe got a standing ovation at the Wallenboyd Theatre Saturday--and it wasn't even opening night--he must have something to say to an audience. I'll be hornswoggled if I can see what it is. Wolfe was appearing on the "Angel's Flight" series, sponsored by Pipeline and the Museum of Contemporary Art. He performed a self-created piece called "Warren's Story."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
Topanga performance artist Kedric Robin Wolfe has a terrific sense of the absurd. Not the existential absurd of Samuel Beckett or Eugene Ionesco, but rather the pointed, socially informed absurd of Jonathan Swift. The kind of absurd that either shocks you or makes you laugh out loud.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
While watching "Aleph 4," the latest in Pipeline's series of grouped (usually four) performance pieces at Saxon-Lee Gallery, it's funny to think of how Hollywood is governed more than ever by the ethic of the high concept--meaning low movies. That is because this particular "Aleph" has a concept of its own: Hollywood, and what it does to people. One of the pieces, to be sure, doesn't follow the concept.
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