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Keiko Fujii

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September 20, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
As a Japanese dance student new to Honolulu, Keiko Fujii had a strange feeling of deja vu when she first saw American break dancers rotate their shoulders in slow motion . "Wow," she remembers thinking, "that's Noh movement." A choreographer who can see a connection between a highly stylized 600-year-old theatrical form and children's sidewalk high jinks in the TV age might be expected to approach her craft in an unabashedly eclectic way.
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September 22, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Against scenic panels that seem to be made of beaten brass, 11 members of the Keiko Fujii Dance Company of Japan are executing stale jazz-dance combinations to a New Age bossa nova. They wear pink gauze kimono tops and oversized silver jodhpurs. Their makeup and hair styles are likewise highly au courant-- but how their actions or appearance relate to "the ethical codes, the obedience of the female and the feudalism of premodern Japan" (the synopsis in the program) is anybody's guess.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Against scenic panels that seem to be made of beaten brass, 11 members of the Keiko Fujii Dance Company of Japan are executing stale jazz-dance combinations to a New Age bossa nova. They wear pink gauze kimono tops and oversized silver jodhpurs. Their makeup and hair styles are likewise highly au courant-- but how their actions or appearance relate to "the ethical codes, the obedience of the female and the feudalism of premodern Japan" (the synopsis in the program) is anybody's guess.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
As a Japanese dance student new to Honolulu, Keiko Fujii had a strange feeling of deja vu when she first saw American break dancers rotate their shoulders in slow motion . "Wow," she remembers thinking, "that's Noh movement." A choreographer who can see a connection between a highly stylized 600-year-old theatrical form and children's sidewalk high jinks in the TV age might be expected to approach her craft in an unabashedly eclectic way.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Popular author Yasuo Tanaka has a penchant for Versace leather suits, flight attendants and disclosing the intimate details of his many affairs. Until recently, he was best known for his three racy diaries. But these days, Tanaka has been making headlines for his tactics in virgin territory: politics.
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