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Keith Brackpool

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NEWS
April 16, 2000 | FRANK CLIFFORD and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Unknown to most Californians, Keith Brackpool, a British-born investment banker, has become a key advisor to Gov. Gray Davis on California's water policy while simultaneously amassing a huge financial stake in the direction that policy takes. Brackpool has bet heavily on a controversial proposal by his firm, Santa Monica-based Cadiz Inc., to extract and sell a vast amount of water stored naturally beneath the Mojave Desert.
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SPORTS
September 27, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
The significance of opening day at Santa Anita on Friday had mostly to do with the Arcadia race track's attempt to enter the brave new world of sports entertainment. For years, thoroughbred racing has been acquiring the label of "a dying sport. " That would be the assessment of the hordes of 20-and-30-somethings, whose passion for sports is a direct line to how their quarterback did in their Sunday fantasy league. Other sports move faster, make more noise and exude more cool than horse racing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2012 | Bettina Boxall
The company that wants to pump large amounts of Mojave Desert groundwater and sell it for a profit to Southern California suburbs has run into opposition from an unexpected quarter: an international corporation that runs industrial salt operations next door to the proposed project. Texas-based Tetra Technologies Inc., an oil and gas services enterprise, has come out swinging at Cadiz Inc.'s pumping plans, filing two lawsuits, mounting a public relations campaign and dismissing the water project's environmental review as a sham designed to escape serious scrutiny.
OPINION
August 6, 2012
The search for reliable water supplies for Southern California has been going on for as long as Americans have lived here, and continues today. State officials are examining a proposal to draw water from the Sacramento River and ship it to this part of California, bypassing the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and its shaky levees. Los Angeles officials are also trying to balance the water needs of the city against their obligations to hold down dust in the Owens Valley, which has long supplied much of Los Angeles' water and whose brackish lake dried up in the process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has appointed to the state Horse Racing Board a politically connected businessman who once employed the governor's chief of staff. The company run by Keith Brackpool, 52, of Los Angeles paid Schwarzenegger Chief of Staff Susan Kennedy $120,000 as a consultant in 2005. She advised the firm, Cadiz Inc., on a project to store water from an underground aquifer in the Mojave Desert for use during droughts. Schwarzenegger, who is negotiating with lawmakers on a water deal that could fund billions of dollars in new projects, endorsed Cadiz's proposal earlier this year, though he has not committed to making it part of an agreement to bolster the state's water supply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000
Re "Desert Water Entrepreneur Closely Tied to Governor," April 16: There are sane environmental and practical alternatives to handing Keith Brackpool's company $50 million in taxpayer money to draw from the Mojave aquifer. Brackpool's scheme would wreak on the Mojave desert the same environmental devastation Mulholland wrought on Owens Valley, the only difference being that dried-up springs, withered habitat and resultant animal dieback would initially be less blatant than was the disappearance of Owens Lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
One of the West's most ambitious private water marketing proposals has taken a step forward with the environmental approval ofCadiz Inc.'s plans to sell massive amounts of Mojave Desert groundwater to Southern California. The board of the Santa Margarita Water District, which serves 155,000 customers in south Orange County, voted 5 to 0 Tuesday night to sign off on the project's environmental impact report under state law. The board also agreed to buy one-tenth of the project's proposed annual yield.
OPINION
August 6, 2012
The search for reliable water supplies for Southern California has been going on for as long as Americans have lived here, and continues today. State officials are examining a proposal to draw water from the Sacramento River and ship it to this part of California, bypassing the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and its shaky levees. Los Angeles officials are also trying to balance the water needs of the city against their obligations to hold down dust in the Owens Valley, which has long supplied much of Los Angeles' water and whose brackish lake dried up in the process.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2006 | Michael Hiltzik
Let us today hoist a glass -- preferably of cool, clean Colorado River water -- to Keith Brackpool, a walking illustration of how the generous bestowal of campaign donations and other largess can keep a man cozy with California politicians, even in the face of evidence that what he's selling may not be worth buying. Brackpool is the chairman and chief executive of Cadiz Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
CADIZ, Calif. - Three decades ago a group of businessmen pored over NASA satellite imagery as part of a worldwide hunt for large groundwater reserves they could tap to grow desert crops. They found the signs they were looking for here in the sun-blasted mountain ranges and creosote-freckled valleys of the Mojave Desert, 200 miles east of Los Angeles. The group, which founded Cadiz Inc., bought old railroad land, drilled wells and planted neat grids of citrus trees and grapevines, irrigating them with water that bubbled out of the desert depths at the rate of 2,000 gallons a minute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
One of the West's most ambitious private water marketing proposals has taken a step forward with the environmental approval ofCadiz Inc.'s plans to sell massive amounts of Mojave Desert groundwater to Southern California. The board of the Santa Margarita Water District, which serves 155,000 customers in south Orange County, voted 5 to 0 Tuesday night to sign off on the project's environmental impact report under state law. The board also agreed to buy one-tenth of the project's proposed annual yield.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2012 | Bettina Boxall
The company that wants to pump large amounts of Mojave Desert groundwater and sell it for a profit to Southern California suburbs has run into opposition from an unexpected quarter: an international corporation that runs industrial salt operations next door to the proposed project. Texas-based Tetra Technologies Inc., an oil and gas services enterprise, has come out swinging at Cadiz Inc.'s pumping plans, filing two lawsuits, mounting a public relations campaign and dismissing the water project's environmental review as a sham designed to escape serious scrutiny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
CADIZ, Calif. - Three decades ago a group of businessmen pored over NASA satellite imagery as part of a worldwide hunt for large groundwater reserves they could tap to grow desert crops. They found the signs they were looking for here in the sun-blasted mountain ranges and creosote-freckled valleys of the Mojave Desert, 200 miles east of Los Angeles. The group, which founded Cadiz Inc., bought old railroad land, drilled wells and planted neat grids of citrus trees and grapevines, irrigating them with water that bubbled out of the desert depths at the rate of 2,000 gallons a minute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has appointed to the state Horse Racing Board a politically connected businessman who once employed the governor's chief of staff. The company run by Keith Brackpool, 52, of Los Angeles paid Schwarzenegger Chief of Staff Susan Kennedy $120,000 as a consultant in 2005. She advised the firm, Cadiz Inc., on a project to store water from an underground aquifer in the Mojave Desert for use during droughts. Schwarzenegger, who is negotiating with lawmakers on a water deal that could fund billions of dollars in new projects, endorsed Cadiz's proposal earlier this year, though he has not committed to making it part of an agreement to bolster the state's water supply.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
People who say that nothing's harder to get rid of than a bad penny must never have met Keith Brackpool. The British-born promoter, who has spent the last dozen years pushing a scheme to pump water to Southern California from beneath 35,000 acres his Cadiz Inc. owns in the Mojave Desert, just won't go away.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2006 | Michael Hiltzik
Let us today hoist a glass -- preferably of cool, clean Colorado River water -- to Keith Brackpool, a walking illustration of how the generous bestowal of campaign donations and other largess can keep a man cozy with California politicians, even in the face of evidence that what he's selling may not be worth buying. Brackpool is the chairman and chief executive of Cadiz Inc.
SPORTS
September 27, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
The significance of opening day at Santa Anita on Friday had mostly to do with the Arcadia race track's attempt to enter the brave new world of sports entertainment. For years, thoroughbred racing has been acquiring the label of "a dying sport. " That would be the assessment of the hordes of 20-and-30-somethings, whose passion for sports is a direct line to how their quarterback did in their Sunday fantasy league. Other sports move faster, make more noise and exude more cool than horse racing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2002 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief advocate of a proposal for a giant water storage project buried under the Mojave Desert is backing an effort to create a state panel that would oversee California's use of Colorado River water. The activity by Keith Brackpool, chief executive officer of Cadiz Inc., has raised concerns from Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and other project critics who worry that Brackpool may be trying to override objections from Southern California's Metropolitan Water District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2002 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief advocate of a proposal for a giant water storage project buried under the Mojave Desert is backing an effort to create a state panel that would oversee California's use of Colorado River water. The activity by Keith Brackpool, chief executive officer of Cadiz Inc., has raised concerns from Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and other project critics who worry that Brackpool may be trying to override objections from Southern California's Metropolitan Water District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000
Re "Desert Water Entrepreneur Closely Tied to Governor," April 16: There are sane environmental and practical alternatives to handing Keith Brackpool's company $50 million in taxpayer money to draw from the Mojave aquifer. Brackpool's scheme would wreak on the Mojave desert the same environmental devastation Mulholland wrought on Owens Valley, the only difference being that dried-up springs, withered habitat and resultant animal dieback would initially be less blatant than was the disappearance of Owens Lake.
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