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Keith Jackson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
SAN FRANCISCO - Keith Jackson came seemingly from nowhere to win a seat on the San Francisco Board of Education, a young newcomer running as a champion of parents and the "problem children" he knew growing up in the city's historically black Western Addition. He disappeared from public prominence years ago after a troubled tenure on the board and for well over a decade earned a comfortable if unassuming living as a niche player in local politics, representing candidates and corporate interests before San Francisco's hard-pressed African American community.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO -  If there has ever been a more nauseating corruption scandal in Sacramento, I'm not aware of it. Certainly not in the past 50 years. The notion of a legislator masquerading as a gun control crusader while offering to help a mobster traffic in automatic rifles and rocket launchers is beyond hypocrisy. It's sick. The obligatory insert here: Everyone is presumed innocent until proved guilty in court. But no one I've talked to presumes any innocence in this sordid case.
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SPORTS
September 10, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Keith Jackson has some stories, all right. Of riding his horse four miles to his rural Georgia high school. Of nights carousing with Paul "Bear" Bryant. Of the time Howard Cosell, smelling like a Russian distillery, set Jackson's pants on fire during a telecast of "Monday Night Football. " "He had the cigar, all that vodka," he recalls. "I almost threw him out of the booth myself. " It's not just the stories that are so captivating, either. It's The Voice, the envy of cellos everywhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
SAN FRANCISCO - Keith Jackson came seemingly from nowhere to win a seat on the San Francisco Board of Education, a young newcomer running as a champion of parents and the "problem children" he knew growing up in the city's historically black Western Addition. He disappeared from public prominence years ago after a troubled tenure on the board and for well over a decade earned a comfortable if unassuming living as a niche player in local politics, representing candidates and corporate interests before San Francisco's hard-pressed African American community.
SPORTS
September 20, 1990 | Staff and Wire Reports
In a surprise move, Keith Jackson, Philadelphia's Pro Bowl tight end, ended his two-month holdout--in time to play against the Rams Sunday at Anaheim Stadium. Jackson, who caught 144 passes in his first two pro seasons, had said he would not report to the team until the final two years of his contract were reworked. The contract remains the same, but he came in anyway. . . .
SPORTS
January 11, 1987 | United Press International
The name Keith Jackson comes up and one sport leaps to mind: college football. Jackson would prefer not to be associated solely with the sport he has broadcast for more than a decade for ABC. Jackson, doing college basketball this winter for the network, would rather be known as a jack-of-all trades. To go a step further, he would just as soon be known as a newsman covering sports. "I'd rather be known as a professional than a specialist," Jackson said.
SPORTS
October 21, 1995
Tight end Keith Jackson ended his three-month contract holdout and reported to the Green Bay Packers, who obtained him in a trade last March with the Miami Dolphins. Sherman Lewis, the Packers' offensive coordinator, said he thinks Jackson could contribute as early as the Oct. 29 game at Detroit. Jackson, an eight-year pro and five-time Pro Bowl player, caught 59 passes for 673 yards and seven touchdowns with Miami last season.
SPORTS
September 9, 1988 | Larry Stewart
On Saturday, Keith Jackson will drive from his hillside home in Sherman Oaks to the Rose Bowl, where he will do the play-by-play on that evening's ABC telecast of the UCLA-Nebraska football game. On Sept. 24, he'll drive to the Coliseum to announce the USC-Oklahoma game. To Jackson, those are plum assignments. "I'm one guy who loves to drive to work," Jackson said. Usually, Jackson flies to work.
SPORTS
September 20, 1990 | TIM KAWAKAMI
In a surprise move, Keith Jackson, the Philadelphia Eagles' Pro Bowl tight end, ended his two-month holdout Wednesday--in time to play against the Rams Sunday at Anaheim Stadium. Jackson, who caught 144 passes and was the NFC's starting tight end in the Pro Bowl in his first two pro seasons, said he would not report to the team until the final two years of his contract were reworked. The contract remains the same, but he came in, anyway.
SPORTS
December 5, 1996 | TIM KAWAKAMI
Whoa, Nellie, do I miss Keith Jackson. The real Keith Jackson. The boom and the FUMMMM-BLE! and the crescendo of sincere, corn-bread emotion. The rolling thunder. The audio conduit to the power and the glory of college football for decades. That sputtering, distant guy who called the Florida State-Florida game last Saturday? The mumbles? The play-by-play that meandered into something approaching free verse and only vaguely matched the pictures being televised?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court upheld a death sentence Monday for a man who was forced to wear a stun belt during his trial, rejecting arguments that the prospect of being electrically shocked adversely affected his demeanor before jurors. In a 6-1 decision, the majority noted that the prosecution had conceded the court erred in requiring the stun belt, but the justices concluded that it did not affect the outcome of the trial. The ruling came in an appeal by Jonathan Keith Jackson, who was convicted of murdering Monique Cleveland during an attempted drug-related robbery in Riverside County in 1996 and attempting to murder her husband, Robert.
SPORTS
September 10, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Keith Jackson has some stories, all right. Of riding his horse four miles to his rural Georgia high school. Of nights carousing with Paul "Bear" Bryant. Of the time Howard Cosell, smelling like a Russian distillery, set Jackson's pants on fire during a telecast of "Monday Night Football. " "He had the cigar, all that vodka," he recalls. "I almost threw him out of the booth myself. " It's not just the stories that are so captivating, either. It's The Voice, the envy of cellos everywhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc, Joseph Serna and Carla Rivera
BANNING - As the Silver fire continued to spread Friday in Riverside County, crews battled flames on the ground and from the sky, and weary residents who lost their homes struggled with the question of whether to rebuild. Burning about 90 miles east of Los Angeles in the San Jacinto Mountains, the Silver fire has blackened about 17,500 acres and destroyed 26 homes. Six people have been injured - a firefighter and five civilians. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in the county late Friday.
SPORTS
September 12, 2008 | Steve Springer
USC and Ohio State. The Coliseum. A national championship perhaps at stake. ABC, Saturday afternoon, 5 p.m. What more could a college football fan ask for? How about Keith Jackson behind the mike? Unfortunately, those days are history. The 80-year-old Jackson retired almost a decade ago, was lured back, then retired again after the 2006 Rose Bowl and he plans to stay that way. No third acts for him. No more descriptions of rumblin', stumblin', fumblin' players by the venerable voice of the game for four decades, one of the most colorful announcers to ever put on a pair of headphones.
SPORTS
May 1, 2006 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
If Keith Jackson, who announced his retirement from broadcasting last week, has a signature phrase, it's "Whoa, Nellie!" However, Jackson claims he never said it, at least not until Roy Firestone put it into his stand-up act. "My mule was named Pearl," Jackson said. The origin: Reader Jack Rosenberg remembers wrestling announcer Dick Lane saying, "Whoa, Nellie! Don't put your coffee pot on yet, folks."
SPORTS
April 28, 2006 | LARRY STEWART
Before Keith Jackson's previous retirement, after the 1998 college football season, there were gifts, speeches, news conferences -- a season-long farewell tour. Six months later, offered a schedule of mostly West Coast games, which involved considerably less travel, he decided to unretire. Jackson, 77, has retired again, this time for sure, he says, and this time amid little fanfare.
SPORTS
January 14, 1993 | Associated Press
Keith Jackson, the Dolphins' Pro Bowl tight end, did not practice Wednesday because of a shoulder injury. Jackson is listed as probable for Sunday's game. "He was the only one who missed practice," Coach Don Shula said. "He feels he'll be ready to play. We didn't want to put him in pads and have him bumping around today." Jackson, who joined the Dolphins as a free agent in September, had four catches for 53 yards and two touchdowns in a 31-0 victory over San Diego last Sunday.
SPORTS
September 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Philadelphia Eagles have agreed to terms with former New York Jets tight end Mickey Shuler, and team owner Norman Braman said the Eagles are ready to play the 1990 season without All-Pro tight end Keith Jackson. Jackson has refused to report to work with the Eagles without a new contract. Braman told The Philadelphia Inquirer that renegotiating the contract was out of the question.
SPORTS
April 27, 2006 | Larry Stewart, Chris Dufresne, From Times Staff and Wire Reports
When Keith Jackson was preparing to announce this year's Rose Bowl game, the bowl championship series national championship game between Texas and USC, he implied it might be his last. It was. "I'm retired," Jackson said Wednesday night. Jackson retired once before, amid much fanfare, after the 1999 Fiesta Bowl, which was the BCS national championship game that season.
SPORTS
January 5, 2006 | Mike Penner
Four hours, 71 points and seemingly a million Vince Young yards into Wednesday night's Rose Bowl, with Young lining up for the play that would decide the so-hyped "Game of the Century," Keith Jackson took a deep breath and set the stage. "Fourth and five," Jackson said. "I kind of feel like Joe [Paterno]. I'm too old for this."
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