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Keith Richards

ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1995 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a free-lance writer based in New York
If Jennifer Trynin becomes a rock star, her story could make a charming movie. The plot: A nice Jewish girl from New Jersey graduates from college with degrees in creative writing and philosophy and moves to Boston. Following the advice of a grandmother named Sadie, she pursues a career in journalism. Her heart is still in music, though, so she soon finds herself leading a double life, doing free-lance ghostwriting and editing by day, then performing songs she's written herself at nightclubs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN
With most rock bands, there is a single party line when it comes to interviews--as if every member sits down ahead of time and agrees on how to tell the story. With the Rolling Stones, however, there is usually the Mick Jagger line and the Keith Richards line. In the mid- and late '80s, when there were tensions between Jagger and Richards over the future of the band, you could understand how these two old chums saw things differently.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
At an age that few fans once even imagined he'd ever live to see, Keith Richards received a standing ovation Saturday night at the Universal Amphitheatre for just walking on stage. And survival is worth celebrating, especially given all the former excesses in the life of the man who virtually defined the concept of renegade rock guitarist. But Richards, 49, refuses to rest on his laurels.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Disarmingly candid, charmingly cantankerous and yet not at all impolite, Keith Richards--who, with the rest of the Rolling Stones, last year signed a mammoth deal with Virgin Records--is probably the wealthiest man alive with whom even the lowliest commoner would feel completely at home in a smoke-filled beer bar. Not that commoners or anyone else are likely to spot Richards, 48, hanging out much these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"The Stones at the IMAX" it ain't. And that ain't bad. This hourlong video document of a single concert from Richards' only tour as a solo artist, like the Keefer-man's own timeworn visage, isn't much to look at. Ostensibly shot strictly for his personal archives on low-budget 16 millimeter and finally unvaulted by popular demand, it's competently shot and almost inert by today's concert-vid standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lots of musicians would consider it a career highlight to play with a musical legend, but pianist Johnnie Johnson has done it at opposite ends of a 40-plus-year career. In 1952, he hired a local singer-guitarist in St. Louis to fill out his trio for a New Year's Eve show: Chuck Berry. In late 1990, he recorded his first major-label album, "Johnnie B. Bad," for Elektra's American Explorer series, and a couple of rock guitarists pitched in: Keith Richards and Eric Clapton.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1991
If there's anything as certain as a live album after a Rolling Stones tour, it's another round of interviews by Mick and Keith to promote the album. In contrast to the increasingly reclusive nature of such American superstar-class pop and rock stars as Michael (Billion Dollar) Jackson, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and Prince, the Stones continue to hit the publicity trail.
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