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Kelley Greene

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NEWS
August 30, 1999 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent morning, Kelley Greene is holding a 7-pound baby chimp in her lap at the Los Angeles Zoo's nursery, while a small boy in a red T-shirt huddles in his father's arms outside the nursery windows. The boy looks at the chimp; the chimp looks back. Then the boy turns shyly into his father's shoulder; the 2-month-old chimp buries his head in Greene's.
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NEWS
August 30, 1999 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent morning, Kelley Greene is holding a 7-pound baby chimp in her lap at the Los Angeles Zoo's nursery, while a small boy in a red T-shirt huddles in his father's arms outside the nursery windows. The boy looks at the chimp; the chimp looks back. Then the boy turns shyly into his father's shoulder; the 2-month-old chimp buries his head in Greene's.
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NEWS
September 13, 1999
I can't get it out of my mind that the chimp babies are taken from their mothers ("An Expert Mother," Aug. 30) at the Los Angeles Zoo when it's the male chimps that are aggressive and maybe dangerous. This is very similar to the human situations where the husband and father is abusive and the wife and child have to leave the home. Why couldn't the mother chimps and the babies be separated out together? None of this is to take away from the good care that Kelley Greene and others are trying to provide, but surely we as humans are smart enough to figure out a better way than sedating the mothers, stealing their babies and hoping that they might recognize them when reunited!
NEWS
September 8, 1999
Regarding "An Expert Mother" (Aug. 30), I find it abominable that you feature Kelley Greene as the "Expert Mother," when in fact, each baby chimp has its own, live, like-species mother, who would be more than willing to raise her own baby. Little was mentioned that each chimp mother "moped for days" following separation from her baby, which occurred following anesthesia. I am shocked that the L.A. Zoo has not done anything to keep these babies together with their respective mothers, but are instead waiting over a year to reunite the families!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2004 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
When giraffe keeper Steve Tirotta arrived at the Los Angeles Zoo on Labor Day morning, he knew Asali was about to give birth. It had been more than 14 months since she had become pregnant. And her calf's front feet were already protruding from the birth canal of the towering mother-to-be. For the next two hours, Tirotta and a privileged group of keepers kept a vigil in the barn attached to the giraffe exhibit.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | ROCHELLE WILKERSON, Times Staff Writer
Stonewood Shopping Center, a 31-year-old open-air mall, is scheduled for a face lift that may include a 150,000-square-foot May Co. store. May Co. has submitted a letter of intent to Hughes Investments, owner of the center, asking permission to build a two-level department store at the mall, which is to be enclosed and expanded by November, 1990. The May Co. proposal must be approved by the three other major stores at Stonewood--J. C.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 2 million people visit the Los Angeles Zoo each year, but how many of them rush to see the gerenuk? How many crowd around the uakari cage? Not many. The lion's share of attention goes to proven crowd-pleasers--animals such as the elephants and chimps and hippos. Others among the zoo's 1,500 creatures lead anonymous lives. Hardly anyone gawks at them. No one remembers their names. They are mere furry beasts and slick reptiles passed along the way.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 2 million people visit the Los Angeles Zoo each year, but how many of them rush to see the gerenuk? How many crowd around the uakari cage? Not many. The lion's share of attention goes to proven crowd-pleasers--animals such as the elephants and chimps and hippos. Others among the zoo's 1,500 creatures lead anonymous lives. Hardly anyone gawks at them. No one remembers their names. They are mere furry beasts and slick reptiles passed along the way.
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