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BUSINESS
May 29, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
East-West Federal Bank, a San Marino thrift that was the nation's first federally chartered Chinese-American savings institution, said Thursday that it will be acquired by Talley Industries of Phoenix. The agreement in principle calls for Talley, a diversified manufacturing firm, to pay $27.3 million, or $17 a share, for the 11-branch thrift. East-West, founded in 1972, is the second local Chinese-American lending institution to be acquired recently.
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NEWS
April 9, 1995 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taiwanese investor received three words of advice about how to turn around the ailing bank he had just bought: Hire Kellogg Chan. In Southern California's Chinese banking circles, the Chan family has the same recognition as the Rockefellers. Back in the early 1960s, Chan's father, F. Chow Chan, had done battle with skeptical state regulators to obtain a charter for Cathay Bank, the first commercial bank in Chinatown. In 1973, F.
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NEWS
April 9, 1995 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taiwanese investor received three words of advice about how to turn around the ailing bank he had just bought: Hire Kellogg Chan. In Southern California's Chinese banking circles, the Chan family has the same recognition as the Rockefellers. Back in the early 1960s, Chan's father, F. Chow Chan, had done battle with skeptical state regulators to obtain a charter for Cathay Bank, the first commercial bank in Chinatown. In 1973, F.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
East-West Federal Bank, a San Marino thrift that was the nation's first federally chartered Chinese-American savings institution, said Thursday that it will be acquired by Talley Industries of Phoenix. The agreement in principle calls for Talley, a diversified manufacturing firm, to pay $27.3 million, or $17 a share, for the 11-branch thrift. East-West, founded in 1972, is the second local Chinese-American lending institution to be acquired recently.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1994 | James S. Granelli, Times staff writer
Executive Exchange: Several Orange County savings and loans have changed top executives and are rethinking their business strategies. Universal Savings Bank in Orange hired veteran thrift operator Kellogg Chan as its chairman and president. Chan built East-West Federal Bank in Los Angeles from an S&L with $25 million in loans and other assets in 1979 to a regional concern with $1.3 billion in assets by the time he retired in 1992. Universal's owner, Taiwanese businessman J.S.
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taiwanese investor received three words of advice about how to turn around the ailing savings bank he had just bought: Hire Kellogg Chan. In Chinese banking circles in Southern California, the Chan family has the same recognition as the Rockefellers. Back in the early 1960s, Chan's father, F. Chow Chan, had done battle with skeptical state regulators to obtain a charter for Cathay Bank, the first commercial bank in Chinatown. In 1973, F.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1990 | IRENE CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Alhambra branch of Eastern International Bank, signs of its Chinese roots are everywhere. Bright red posters with Chinese characters adorn the walls. Tellers and customers freely converse in Mandarin, Cantonese and Fujianese, the dialect spoken in Fujian province and Taiwan. Outside, restaurants, bookstores and grocery stores line a busy stretch of Valley Boulevard in the western San Gabriel Valley, a haven for one of the nation's fastest-growing Chinese-American communities.
FOOD
September 30, 2009 | Betty Hallock
It's the cake that has fueled hundreds of thousands of birthdays, weddings and office parties across Los Angeles. You've probably had it: two layers of soft yellow sponge cake that sandwich a filling of fresh strawberries and fluffy whipped cream, frosted all over with yet more whipped cream, ringed with toasted almonds on the sides and decorated with red, blue or pink roses on top. It might have said, "Thank you for all your hard work," "Congratulations,...
BUSINESS
January 11, 1990 | ANTHONY MILLICAN
Others may look at a map of Kearny Mesa and see nothing more than a grid work of streets, retail centers and industrial complexes. Grover Fang, however, sees a golden opportunity for a bank that caters to the needs of Asian-Americans, particularly recent immigrants from Southeast Asia who are frustrated by U.S. banking rules and customs that they have difficulty comprehending.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1988 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators are peddling insolvent savings and loans across the nation as fast as they can, but they have been slow to approve mergers or acquisitions involving some healthier institutions. And even though this week's agreement to sell American Savings to the Robert M. Bass Group of Ft. Worth eliminates the industry's biggest headache, the deal isn't likely to shorten the long waits facing some investors who want to buy solvent S&Ls.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1987 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
In February, 1986, American International Bank opened a branch in an Alhambra office abandoned as unprofitable by Bank of America. The new branch was in the black in two months, and its $40 million in deposits are now more than half of the bank's total. How could a small, fairly new bank make a go of it in the very building where the state's biggest bank failed? Part of the answer lies in scale.
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